?In our Apple stores we imagine the future without limits?

  • Posted: 26 November 2010 03:48 PM

    Ron Johnson speaking with a Minneapolis Civic caucus.  Great Stuff!

    Find it here.

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  • Posted: 27 November 2010 02:12 PM #1

    BillH - 26 November 2010 07:48 PM

    Ron Johnson speaking with a Minneapolis Civic caucus.  Great Stuff!

    Find it here.

    Wow. This was worth the read.  grin

    It’s a well written highlight of his presentation. I’m downloading the pdf for further reading. But this one line really struck me as key:

    “Johnson said he?s never attended an executive meeting at Apple that talked about making money. Instead, Apple?s mission is to make technology easy for people to use. ?Profit is our reward for serving people well.?

         
  • Posted: 27 November 2010 03:28 PM #2

    DawnTreader - 27 November 2010 06:12 PM
    BillH - 26 November 2010 07:48 PM

    Ron Johnson speaking with a Minneapolis Civic caucus.  Great Stuff!

    Find it here.

    Wow. This was worth the read.  grin

    It’s a well written highlight of his presentation. I’m downloading the pdf for further reading. But this one line really struck me as key:

    “Johnson said he?s never attended an executive meeting at Apple that talked about making money. Instead, Apple?s mission is to make technology easy for people to use. ?Profit is our reward for serving people well.?

    It was also interesting to read this.

    Steve Jobs sets the vision for Apple, Johnson said, but added that, ?Leaders want to be told what needs to be accomplished, but then be let loose to achieve it. Steve has been by far the best and most inspiring person with whom I have worked.?

    I’m used to Steve being regarded as the most inspiring but I think the best part is not understood by many of the older media types in the tech arena.  They really can’t seem to get their head around the concept of maturation with age and/or experience.  That isn’t to say that he won’t take people to task for bonehead comments now and again (which I still find endearing because I’m twisted like that).  wink

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    Posted: 27 November 2010 03:43 PM #3

    The comments section was interesting as well. I"m sure that there are a lot more positive comments that didn’t see the light of day but these give a little perspective.

         
  • Posted: 27 November 2010 04:10 PM #4

    ChasMac77 - 27 November 2010 07:43 PM

    The comments section was interesting as well. I"m sure that there are a lot more positive comments that didn’t see the light of day but these give a little perspective.

    They do but I’m not entirely sure that it’s a reflection of Apple (at which it’s definitely directed) or at retail.  I worked retail in High School (service station) and College (high end men’s clothing) but wouldn’t have ever considered it as a career.  It’s best served by the young and enthusiastic in most cases.  The turnover would be a natural extension of the more ambitious moving on with those unable to (for whatever reason) growing increasingly bitter about the pay such work commands.  Ron’s from my hometown and is truly as idealistic and down to earth as his verbiage would imply.  He’s also one of the nicer people you’ll ever meet and my daughter (Intuit employee living in the Bay Area) took instant umbrage to me passing on the comments to my wife.  She snapped at me that “everybody loves Ron out there and I’ve talked to a lot of people on the retail side”. 

    Now…,having said that…

    We never sat around and talked about profit in my business either.  We did however spend a lot of time talking about sales projections and the necessary steps, resources (human and otherwise), and tools needed to reach said objectives.  There is also a natural outcome of profit when discussing unit cost, qty. and sale price.  So…,it’s not exactly the whole story when you say you don’t discuss profit.  Had he said we don’t discuss profit as a means to and end (which is what I believe he meant)  I would completely buy that.

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    I don’t mind being wrong…,I just hate being wrong so FAST!

         
  • Posted: 28 November 2010 02:44 PM #5

    Much of my career over the past twenty five years has had finance and accounting as either a primary or subordinate responsibility (anyone surprised?).

    In my view among the worst things one can do to morale and one thing that can destroy the effectiveness of meetings is an overt discussion of dollars. In organizations both large and small much of the staff have no direct involvement in the financial outcome of the organization other than to the extent that each employee is a cost center or might have budget responsibility in a particular area.

    In a healthy organization the focus should always be on outcomes for which employees have direct influence and some element of control. I’m a big believer in focusing staff members on the top line. In most instances if the top line is achieved the bottom line will follow. Budget or financial realities should be addressed within the context of top line growth or desired organizational outcomes.

    In my view bottom line growth is an outcome of organizational efficiency and a successful focus on top line growth. Costs should be discussed in the context of efficiency and the manner in which resources are applied in supporting staff members in achieving their assigned goals.

    A sign of an unhealthy organization is a management obsession with every decisions that’s made from a cost perspective and a practice of dragging employees through the mud or second guessing every expenditure (large or small) made by each employee. Having employees looking over their shoulder and wondering if they will be taken to task over every cost decision is a waste of employee time and it’s time spent away from achieving organizational goals.

    It’s management’s responsibility to craft an operating environment in which the methods for cost decisions or the efficient provision of resources is made as easy as possible for employees to understand and follow.

    Human resource investments are a huge component of organizational costs. Handcuffing employees in fear or concerns every decision they make is scrutinized beyond its importance is a recipe for inefficiency, high turnover and a really unpleasant work environment.

    It’s no secret as to why Apple is so successful.