Amazing Buildings Designed By Foster + Partners

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    Posted: 06 December 2010 03:28 PM

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    [Topic title and links edited by DT]

    [ Edited: 06 December 2010 03:55 PM by DawnTreader ]

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    Posted: 06 December 2010 03:54 PM #1

    My initial feeling was that this was a waste of money.  Then I reconsidered, after looking at the incredible architectural projects from around the world in recent years.  The USA was once the most forward thinking of nations, but in the last 30 years we have become inward and backwards looking.  If America’s premier company can create one of the world’s premier architectural statements about the future, I say it is a great use of resources.

         
  • Posted: 07 December 2010 12:36 PM #2

    As an architect, it is always good to see new development opportunities emerge, especially on a game-changing scale.

    Glad to hear fellow Brit Uncle Norm got the job in place of Steve’s favourite T-square boys Bohlin Cywinski Jackson. Guess he wants to keep them focussed on his new house.

    It will be interesting to see how “green” the Apple campus turns out, with all of the opportunities for sustainability that a tech client can aspire to. Let’s hope the target is “zero energy”, which is the baseline for my company’s developments.

         
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    Posted: 07 December 2010 12:57 PM #3

    I was driving around the countryside yesterday.  Due to the nature of property taxes and return on investment, farmers let their unproductive barns fall down.  A half-fallen-down barn saves the farmers more on property taxes than a barn which is torn down or a barn which is well-kept.

    People want to live in good looking areas.  The people with skills and money who want to move will move to good looking areas.

    If Apple’s offices look good, this is a productive step. 

    However, some of the smaller stores are looking comparatively plain.

         
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    Posted: 07 December 2010 02:03 PM #4

    Tardis - 07 December 2010 04:36 PM

    It will be interesting to see how “green” the Apple campus turns out, with all of the opportunities for sustainability that a tech client can aspire to. Let’s hope the target is “zero energy”, which is the baseline for my company’s developments.

    I am thinking that it will be very green. The atmosphere for that here in California is very encouraging with tax incentives as well as energy cost savings. Every new construction and many renovations have solar panels and other energy savings.

    ?In building the city, let us remember that the material things which will endure the longest are those that express the spirit of man in art. In the arts of landscape and architecture the spirit of a city can be preserved for ages.? John Marston

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  • Posted: 07 December 2010 03:09 PM #5

    Tetrachloride - 07 December 2010 04:57 PM

    I was driving around the countryside yesterday.  Due to the nature of property taxes and return on investment, farmers let their unproductive barns fall down.  A half-fallen-down barn saves the farmers more on property taxes than a barn which is torn down or a barn which is well-kept.

    People want to live in good looking areas.  The people with skills and money who want to move will move to good looking areas.

    If Apple’s offices look good, this is a productive step. 

    However, some of the smaller stores are looking comparatively plain.

    And Tardis wrote:

    As an architect, it is always good to see new development opportunities emerge, especially on a game-changing scale.

    Glad to hear fellow Brit Uncle Norm got the job in place of Steve?s favourite T-square boys Bohlin Cywinski Jackson. Guess he wants to keep them focussed on his new house.

    It will be interesting to see how ?green? the Apple campus turns out, with all of the opportunities for sustainability that a tech client can aspire to. Let?s hope the target is ?zero energy?, which is the baseline for my company?s developments.

    I have a couple of thoughts on the above.  I think the pride (or lack there of) exhibited by the farmers says a lot more about those individuals than it does about our tax structure.  At least I hope so.

    As far as some of the stores looking a bit dated I would totally agree if we could change the word to worn.  The reason that I would have preferred to see Bohlin Cywinski get the project is tied into the issue of the Apple Stores.  My biggest criticism of the modern movement (going back to some lively debates with the Dean of our school) has to do with how it appears when first built and later, when it ages.  For modern buildings to be attractive and welcoming requires pristine detailing and superior craftsmanship.  It’s those qualities that make the Apple stores pleasant places to visit and spend time in.  It also significantly impacts the cost of construction and how one feels about them when they’re a little more ‘used’.  Bohlin Cywinski’s work (outside of the Apple Stores) makes greater use of stone and wood.  Materials that (forgive me) take on a certain patina as they’re abused and age.  The cities of europe feel so comfortable compared to our own because of these attributes. Uncle Norm doesn’t seem quite as inclined in that direction. 

    I expect the phone to ring any minute with Steve wondering what my take would be re: the architectural selection for their upcoming multi-million dollar campus.  :rollsanta:

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  • Posted: 07 December 2010 04:03 PM #6

    I think you might be mischaracterizing the farmer’s motivation—we’re among the thriftiest, we save everything we can to re-use somehow, be it steel, manure, inner tubes, tires, buckets of bolts and springs, etc. Some old buildings simply can’t be used anymore for safety, business or technological reasons, and driving by won’t get you that insight. And most of those old barns and shed are eco disasters built when people were 5’7”—kind of impossible to really use now.

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    Posted: 07 December 2010 04:47 PM #7

    In the past, barns were all about animals with certain kinds of methods.  The modern farmer largely doesn’t use that kind of barn anymore.  An unfortunate number of times, if the barn is falling down, so is the house, so to speak.  The smaller farms are not profitable enough to keep a full mixed operation in Wisconsin.

    [ Edited: 07 December 2010 04:49 PM by Tetrachloride ]      
  • Posted: 07 December 2010 06:22 PM #8

    farmboy - 07 December 2010 08:03 PM

    I think you might be mischaracterizing the farmer’s motivation—we’re among the thriftiest, we save everything we can to re-use somehow, be it steel, manure, inner tubes, tires, buckets of bolts and springs, etc. Some old buildings simply can’t be used anymore for safety, business or technological reasons, and driving by won’t get you that insight. And most of those old barns and shed are eco disasters built when people were 5’7”—kind of impossible to really use now.

    I’m standing by my point.  Most of my family works in agribusiness and I lived with a bunch of farm kids during my collegiate tenure in the fine state of Kansas.  I know them well. Cheap suckers and genetically thrifty.  (obvious exception being their 4 wheel ride of choice).  I also thought they were the most considerate and (surprisingly) well travelled people I met there.  Most went back to the farm after graduating.  I’m only referring to what I see driving through the midwest.  I know the day of the dutch gambrel barn is coming to an end as is much of the world I grew up in.  Still, fix em up an paint em (or tear em down).  Please.

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    Posted: 07 December 2010 08:07 PM #9

    Us NYkers pay good money for dem beams.

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  • Posted: 07 December 2010 08:47 PM #10

    macglenn - 08 December 2010 12:07 AM

    Us NYkers pay good money for dem beams.

    You betcha they do.  wink 

    They look like lawns
    these fields in spring

    Fresh tilled dirt
    with dew does gleam

    Boards that rot
    where stallions trot

    can break the spell
    decays death knell


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    Posted: 07 December 2010 10:07 PM #11

    Norman Foster is a legend. Hearst Tower is one of the more striking buildings here in NY (and it fits very well), and the Gherkin in London is just tons of fun. I also visited the Reichstag dome in Berlin: very interesting piece and it seems to fit well with the pre-existing building (to the point that materials should age well). Very happy he’s been contracted to design for Apple.

    In other news, I’m amused by the spirited discussion of farming :bugeyed: