Android: Too Much Choice

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    Posted: 14 January 2011 03:17 PM #31

    Bosco (Brad Hutchings) - 14 January 2011 05:44 PM

    To paraphrase the legendary rock band, Rush, if you choose to let Apple decide, you still have made a choice.

    FWIW, that’s a take off from the classical argument between western either/or thinking versus eastern both/and thinking, where if a person claims eastern thinking is superior, the counter claim can be made that western thinking was employed to make the choice.

    I digress from my off-topic segue.

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  • Posted: 14 January 2011 03:26 PM #32

    http://blogs.cars.com/kickingtires/2009/03/first-turnbyturn-navigation-app-for-iphone-xroads-gmap-review.html

    Turn by Turn Navigation pulled from app store?
    There was one.

         
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    Posted: 14 January 2011 03:34 PM #33

    paikinho - 14 January 2011 07:17 PM

    Plus, I’m not sure that mounting a much bigger Android device would work on a bike anyhow.

    Funny you say that, because there are Android devices which are bigger, about the same size, and smaller than the iPhone.

    But to your assessment of my thesis… Apple is not doomed. But its relevance peaked many months ago in the smartphone arena It’s in a steep retreat (though not as steep as RIM’s) and it’s not coming back. The Verizon Unicorn makes no difference.

    BTW, voice activated turn-by-turn directions with real time traffic and maps is built into Froyo and integrated right into voice search. There are no apps or maps to purchase. SMSreader is an inexpensive app that runs in the background and speaks when SMS messages come in. A similar, seamless service still would not be allowed on iOS under Apple’s guidelines.

         
  • Posted: 14 January 2011 03:42 PM #34

    Wow, this has turned into a dynamic discussion. Go to it. I’ll be back later to enjoy the fruits that bloom from this discussion.

    I just wanted to throw out an idea that I’ve have for-seeming-for-ever but can’t quite finalize. People often criticize Apple for limiting choice. But limiting choice is what every retailer does. Gap sells clothes, not electronics; Malls only allow certain types of stores into their clique; Victoria’s Secrets sells women’s undergarments but not Tuxedo or men’s apparel. Limiting choice is not only good, it’s essential.

    But still, I rail against companies that use proprietary standards or who use DRM or who arbitrarily force me to do things their way instead of my way. I don’t think its hypocrisy - I think it’s a subtle line that I’m failing to define, distinguish or determine. Of course, that’s what a paradox is - a seeming contradiction. But if any of you have any thoughts on the distinctions between when choice is good and when choice is bad, I’d love to hear those thoughts.

         
  • Posted: 14 January 2011 03:43 PM #35

    Bosco (Brad Hutchings) - 14 January 2011 07:34 PM
    paikinho - 14 January 2011 07:17 PM

    Plus, I’m not sure that mounting a much bigger Android device would work on a bike anyhow.

    Funny you say that, because there are Android devices which are bigger, about the same size, and smaller than the iPhone.

    But to your assessment of my thesis… Apple is not doomed. But its relevance peaked many months ago in the smartphone arena It’s in a steep retreat (though not as steep as RIM’s) and it’s not coming back. The Verizon Unicorn makes no difference.

    BTW, voice activated turn-by-turn directions with real time traffic and maps is built into Froyo and integrated right into voice search. There are no apps or maps to purchase. SMSreader is an inexpensive app that runs in the background and speaks when SMS messages come in. A similar, seamless service still would not be allowed on iOS under Apple’s guidelines.

    Just posted from the head of LG talking about the Windows 7 phone.


    “LG has gone on record saying that Windows Phone 7 hasn?t performed as well as it thought it would, following the launch of the mobile OS in October,” Stuart Miles reports for Pocket-lint.

    “‘From an industry perspective we had a high expectation, but from a consumer point of view the visibility is less than we expected,’ James Choi, marketing strategy and planning team director of LG Electronics global told Pocket-lint in a one-to-one interview,” Miles reports. “‘What we feel is that some people believe that some operating systems, mainly Google, are extremely complicated for them...,’ explains Choi when we asked how it was all going.”

    Yep.  Apples doomed!  Doomed I tell you!  Bwah ha ha ha   :-D

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  • Posted: 14 January 2011 04:07 PM #36

    But to your assessment of my thesis? Apple is not doomed. But its relevance peaked many months ago in the smartphone arena It?s in a steep retreat (though not as steep as RIM?s) and it?s not coming back. The Verizon Unicorn makes no difference.

    How is apple doomed as sales are escalating in an emerging market?

    In real terms Apple is selling roughly double the number of iPhones they did during the same period last year. With the Verizon deal that will increase slightly. Apple could sell close to 100 million iPhones during the next year. Certainly they will sell nearly that many iOS devices and double what they have this year.

    The market is emerging and Android will certainly take a bigger percentage of the market, but I find it hard to fathom how you can say Apples relevance has peaked. I don’t see what the metric you are using when you say Apple is in steep retreat?

    The company while having allegedly diminishing relevance has become the second largest company behind Exxon in capitalization. They have 50 billion cash reserves and are making record profits on products which excite a large number of the potential buyers.

    I’m not sure by what basis you are making your determinations. Economic, technologic, social? What you say just doesn’t seem to hold much water. Could you elaborate your Logical thread as to how exactly Apples relevance peaked?
    In what way is Apple in steep retreat?

         
  • Posted: 14 January 2011 04:09 PM #37

    I’m on my way out, but I just wanted to throw this into the “choice” conversation.

    Great review of life with a Nexus S from a former iPhone user. Matches my experiences with the Nexus S almost exactly. On battery life:

    To prolong the battery life, I?ve learned to do this little dance with my phone. Arrive somewhere, turn on GPS, check-in on Foursquare, turn off GPS. Turn off Wi-Fi, if none present. Turn on Wi-Fi when I get back home. Turn off Sync when I?m worried about the battery draining too quickly and I?m far from home. Turn everything off if the phone is going to sit around for a while, unused. Turn Auto-Brightness on, turn it off. Turn 3G on, turn it off. Over and over, I?m tapping the little Settings widget. [?]

    I asked my (non-tech savvy) husband who totes the Galaxy S if he had the same problem. His response, and one I?ve seen echoed among Android?s many fans, is that it?s ?no big deal? to switch something off if you?re not using it. ?It?s like turning off the lights when you leave the room,? my husband said. (I?m not good at that, either).

    Via John Gruber, here.

    I think this is a big part of the “choice” paradox. Some people don’t mind turning the lights on and off all the time and they appreciate the choice. Other people, in fact the vast majority of people identified as the “fat middle” find the constant interaction with their phones “switches” tedious at best, odious at worst. Neither side is likely to even understand what the other is talking about. One side asks: “How can choice be a bad thing if there is no downside?” The other side asks: “What good is choice if the choice causes paralysis”. Both are right, but both are only right from their perspective.

    [ Edited: 14 January 2011 09:56 PM by FalKirk ]      
  • Posted: 14 January 2011 05:07 PM #38

    Bosco,

    You crack me up.  For the record, I believe that you are totally wrong in your assessment of the iPhone market, and in your evaluation of Apple’s future.

    If you have the courage of your convictions you should short Apple (unless you already have).  I will stay long in Apple until the Apple bears capitulate and over-react causing a bubble, at which time I will steal away.

    BTW, do you believe in astrology?  How about evolution?

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    The measure of the worth of a product is how much people are willing to pay for it, not how many people will buy it if the price is low enough.

         
  • Posted: 14 January 2011 05:29 PM #39

    westech - 14 January 2011 09:07 PM

    Bosco,

    BTW, do you believe in astrology?  How about evolution?

    Nope. He only believes that he is right.

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    Posted: 15 January 2011 03:19 AM #40

    westech - 14 January 2011 09:07 PM

    BTW, do you believe in astrology?  How about evolution?

    Very clever!!! Hey, maybe since Bosco disagrees with you, he also still believes in Santa Claus or Barack Obama!! But if you truly understood and believed the story of evolution, you’d appreciate the beauty of the messiness of the unplanned market which is Android, and you’d see the utter folly of Apple’s Intelligent Design myth.

    Here are a couple things I’ve been very right on, while most of the TMO commenters have been clueless on over the past year:

    1. Android quickly dominated iPhone no matter how you wanted to measure it. I think a year counts as quickly.

    2. Apple was not able to kill Flash.

    This year, I think Apple competitors will slap back at Apple with increasing frequency and ferocity. WebM is the second volley after Facebook rebuffed Apple on Ping.

         
  • Posted: 15 January 2011 04:18 AM #41

    Bosco (Brad Hutchings) - 15 January 2011 07:19 AM

    Here are a couple things I’ve been very right on, while most of the TMO commenters have been clueless on over the past year:

    1. Android quickly dominated iPhone no matter how you wanted to measure it. I think a year counts as quickly.

    2. Apple was not able to kill Flash.

    This year, I think Apple competitors will slap back at Apple with increasing frequency and ferocity. WebM is the second volley after Facebook rebuffed Apple on Ping.

    1.  Can you point to a service provider that included both Android products and the iPhone where Android generated more sales? 

    2.  Apple isn’t trying to kill Flash.  They just don’t want it gumming up their equipment.

    3.  Competitors are always slapping back (do you mean bitch slapping?  a little lost here) at each other.  That’s why it’s called competition.  What’s your point?

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    Posted: 15 January 2011 07:40 AM #42

    Well I am a huge believer in Aapl, I think it does have one issue in regards to it selling it’s old model iPhone as it’s entry level model.

    Apple was selling the iPhone 3G until July 2010 as it’s entry level iPhone (a full 2 years after it’s release).

    If you had purchased this phone then, you would likely be annoyed to find in several months that apple had all but discontinued support for your device from all new iOS updates.

    This is a shabby practice, and I’m glad apple stopped doing it for it’s iPod touch line (where it had it’s entry level model as the year ago model).

    I hope they rectify this in the iPhone line this year.

    (it might be that the jump in power from the 3GS to the iPhone 4 proves big enough for the iPhone 4 to be long supported, and be able to still be a worthy entry level model for another year once iPhone 5 arrives - what does everyone think?

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  • Posted: 15 January 2011 08:36 AM #43

    it might be that the jump in power from the 3GS to the iPhone 4 proves big enough for the iPhone 4 to be long supported

    I hope not. 2 years and out, things are moving along quickly in hardware. May all flip phones today be iPhone 4’s in 3 years.

         
  • Posted: 15 January 2011 02:15 PM #44

    Bosco (Brad Hutchings) - 14 January 2011 05:44 PM

    To paraphrase the legendary rock band, Rush, if you choose to let Apple decide, you still have made a choice.

    ...and Geddy made the right choice:

    Smart man…

         
  • Posted: 15 January 2011 02:20 PM #45

    Bosco (Brad Hutchings) - 15 January 2011 07:19 AM

    1. Android quickly dominated iPhone no matter how you wanted to measure it. I think a year counts as quickly.

    The iPhone device by itself dominates the entire Android collective no matter how you measure it.

    2. Apple was not able to kill Flash.

    Apple doesn’t give a damn about Flash but Flash is most definitely in the process of dying, mostly by its own hand.