10 Billion Apps? Really?

  • Posted: 14 January 2011 03:41 PM

    Quick question here… Apple are now running a countup to 10 billion Apps downloaded. Any idea how this is being calculated?

    It took until Feb 2010 for them to hit 10 billion songs downloaded but only, what, 3 years for 10 billion Apps?

    One assumes they are counting every app downloaded. Including updates and the like and maybe also including apps downloaded from the Mac App Store too.

    How many devices? How many Apps? Any thoughts?

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    Posted: 15 January 2011 08:43 AM #1

    rattyuk - 14 January 2011 07:41 PM

    Quick question here… Apple are now running a countup to 10 billion Apps downloaded. Any idea how this is being calculated?

    It took until Feb 2010 for them to hit 10 billion songs downloaded but only, what, 3 years for 10 billion Apps?

    One assumes they are counting every app downloaded. Including updates and the like and maybe also including apps downloaded from the Mac App Store too.

    How many devices? How many Apps? Any thoughts?

    Apple only counts “new” apps downloaded, not updates. I believe these are only iOS apps as the Mac App Store is a different class.

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  • Posted: 15 January 2011 09:38 AM #2

    asymco - 15 January 2011 12:43 PM

    Apple only counts “new” apps downloaded, not updates. I believe these are only iOS apps as the Mac App Store is a different class.

    Thanks for the response Horace. That really makes it that very impressive.

    Does no one else find it absolutely astonishing that iOS apps have something like two or three times the uptake of music from iTunes?

    Are there any current charts on iTunes music uptake? Has it also accelerated this dramatically over the last, what, three years?

    Ten Billion apps divided by how many iOS devices? What is that as an average per device?

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    Posted: 15 January 2011 09:55 AM #3

    Via Itunes Store Wiki

    Music
    100 million songs sold: Summer, 2004
    (Kevin Britten of Hays, Kansas, bought the 100 millionth song, and the twenty-year-old was given a call from Steve Jobs congratulating him.)[33]
    125 million songs sold: September 1, 2004[34]
    150 million songs sold: October 14, 2004[35]
    200 million songs sold: December 16, 2004
    (Ryan Alekman of Belchertown, Massachusetts, USA, bought the 200 millionth song, which was one of the tracks on U2’s digital box set The Complete U2.)[36]
    250 million songs sold: January 24, 2005[37]
    300 million songs sold: March 2, 2005[38]
    400 million songs sold: May 10, 2005[39]
    On July 5, 2005 Apple announced a promotion counting down to half a billion songs sold.[40]
    500 million songs sold: July 18, 2005
    (Amy Greer of Lafayette, Indiana, USA, bought the 500 millionth song, “Mississippi Girl” by Faith Hill.)[41]
    850 million songs sold: January 10, 2006[42]
    1 billion songs sold: February 23, 2006
    (Alex Ostrovsky of West Bloomfield, Michigan, bought the billionth song, “Speed of Sound” by Coldplay.[43] He later got a call from Steve Jobs with the good news that the sixteen-year-old was getting ten iPods, an iMac, a $10,000 music gift certificate, and a scholarship established in his name at the Juilliard School.)[33]
    1.5 billion songs sold: September 12, 2006[44]
    2 billion songs sold: January 10, 2007[44]
    2.5 billion songs sold: April 9, 2007[45]
    3 billion songs sold: July 31, 2007[46]
    4 billion songs sold: January 15, 2008
    5 billion songs sold: June 19, 2008[47]
    6 billion songs sold: January 6, 2009[48]
    8 billion songs sold: July 21, 2009
    8.6 billion songs sold: September 9, 2009
    10 billion songs sold: February 24, 2010[49]

    Applications
    10 million apps downloaded: July 14, 2008[55]
    100 million apps downloaded: September 9, 2008[56]
    200 million apps downloaded: October 22, 2008[57]
    300 million apps downloaded: December 5, 2008[58]
    500 million apps downloaded: January 16, 2009[59]
    800 million apps downloaded: March 17, 2009[60]
    1 billion apps downloaded: April 23, 2009[61]
    1.5 billion apps downloaded: July 14, 2009[62]
    1.8 billion apps downloaded: September 9, 2009
    2 billion apps downloaded: September 28, 2009
    3 billion apps downloaded: January 5, 2010
    7 billion apps downloaded: October 20, 2010

         
  • Posted: 15 January 2011 11:28 AM #4

    pats - 15 January 2011 01:55 PM

    Applications
    10 million apps downloaded: July 14, 2008[55]
    100 million apps downloaded: September 9, 2008[56]
    200 million apps downloaded: October 22, 2008[57]
    300 million apps downloaded: December 5, 2008[58]
    500 million apps downloaded: January 16, 2009[59]
    800 million apps downloaded: March 17, 2009[60]
    1 billion apps downloaded: April 23, 2009[61]
    1.5 billion apps downloaded: July 14, 2009[62]
    1.8 billion apps downloaded: September 9, 2009
    2 billion apps downloaded: September 28, 2009
    3 billion apps downloaded: January 5, 2010
    7 billion apps downloaded: October 20, 2010

    The jump between the Jan 5th Count and the October count shows the iPad adoption of course. Looks like the holiday season helped Apple ship a load more devices (like we didn’t know - but another way of confirmation)

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  • Posted: 15 January 2011 11:41 AM #5

    I think it is natural that apps would be downloaded a lot faster than songs on itunes.

    Songs aren’t free, whilst a lot of apps are - simple microeconomics predicts that when something is supplied for free, demand is essentially unlimited.  Therefore, it would be odd if we didn’t see an explosion in apps downloaded when there are so many apps available at no cost.

    However, 10 bil is still a large number, and more importantly it looks set to be expanding more rapidly (steepening download rate), which signifies increasing numbers of iOS products in the market, which can only be good for AAPL…  That’s my key take away at any rate.

         
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    Posted: 15 January 2011 11:52 AM #6

    and the app store chart only through October 11 2010 though

    from the App store wiki

    Pretty amazing to compare the growth of the App store (2 1/2 years old) to itunes first 2 1/2 years.

    [ Edited: 15 January 2011 11:56 AM by $Billyall ]      
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    Posted: 15 January 2011 12:04 PM #7

    and an interesting graphic showing revenue share by monetization type from apps. Not sure what the current ratio of downloads of free/paid apps is though.

    from Venturebeat

         
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    Posted: 15 January 2011 12:09 PM #8

    deleted

         
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    Posted: 15 January 2011 12:22 PM #9

    Any idea what the average cost-per-app might be? Maybe $1?

    :apple:

         
  • Posted: 15 January 2011 02:59 PM #10

    rattyuk - 15 January 2011 01:38 PM
    asymco - 15 January 2011 12:43 PM

    Apple only counts “new” apps downloaded, not updates. I believe these are only iOS apps as the Mac App Store is a different class.

    Thanks for the response Horace. That really makes it that very impressive.

    Does no one else find it absolutely astonishing that iOS apps have something like two or three times the uptake of music from iTunes?

    This is one of the reasons why I think the Mac App Store is going to do so well too. The process Apple has implemented removes so many barriers. It lowers costs (sometimes to free). It lowers the work required to acquire an app to almost nothing. It removes security and authenticity concerns. Under those conditions, the distance between thinking about making a purchase and actually making a purchase is almost non-existant.

    The Mac App Store is modeled on the App Store. The circumstances between the two are not identical, but they are more similar than dissimilar.  I expect the results of the Mac App Store to be proportionally very similar to those of the App Store. And in some ways the impact may even be greater.

         
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    Posted: 15 January 2011 03:52 PM #11

    rattyuk - 15 January 2011 01:38 PM
    asymco - 15 January 2011 12:43 PM

    Apple only counts “new” apps downloaded, not updates. I believe these are only iOS apps as the Mac App Store is a different class.

    Thanks for the response Horace. That really makes it that very impressive.

    Does no one else find it absolutely astonishing that iOS apps have something like two or three times the uptake of music from iTunes?

    Are there any current charts on iTunes music uptake? Has it also accelerated this dramatically over the last, what, three years?

    Ten Billion apps divided by how many iOS devices? What is that as an average per device?

    I’m working on a post about this.

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  • Posted: 15 January 2011 05:29 PM #12

    I thinking about the difficulty, and expense, of changing platforms from iOS to, say, Android.

    This used to be the argument of Windows users when looking at changing to Mac.  But the gorilla in the app space didn’t exist when Apple introduced the iPhone, then iPhone apps.  Now they are the gorilla.

    The inertia required for a fragmented Android effort to over take this crucial element of mobility is beyond enormous, and long term is what will slowly choke them to death.

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  • Posted: 15 January 2011 08:54 PM #13

    Gregg Thurman - 15 January 2011 09:29 PM

    I thinking about the difficulty, and expense, of changing platforms from iOS to, say, Android.

    This used to be the argument of Windows users when looking at changing to Mac.  But the gorilla in the app space didn’t exist when Apple introduced the iPhone, then iPhone apps.  Now they are the gorilla.

    The inertia required for a fragmented Android effort to over take this crucial element of mobility is beyond enormous, and long term is what will slowly choke them to death.

    I used to think that Apple’s current App advantage was a direct parallel to the Application advantage that Windows enjoyed in the nineties. For this reason (and others), I thought that a new platform like Windows Phone 7 and the upcoming webOS or even the RIM playbook would have little or no chance of gaining a purchase in an already overcrowded mobile market. The “App Gap” was insurmountable. Without Apps, the phones wouldn’t sell, and the phones weren’t selling, they wouldn’t attract developers, and without developers there would be no Apps, etc, etc, etc. A vicious, and every downward spiral.

    I no longer feel that way. It’s very clear that the Android Apps and the Android App Stores are inferior to that of Apple’s. And Apple’s App advantages and Android’s App deficiencies were far more pronounced just 12 to 18 months ago. Still, the Android platform grew and continues to grow like a weed. Things like iTunes and the App store are a huge advantage in selling Apple hardware and an even larger advantage in building customer loyalty with those who own Apple hardware, but they are NOT ESSENTIAL. They are the icing on the cake, not the cake.

    With the upcoming introduction of the Verizon iPhone, I have been wondering whether there would be any App lock-in. I’ve concluded that any lock-in, either way, would be almost negligible. If one is moving from an Android system to iOS, there is almost no pain from the transfer because almost all Android Apps are free. With no costs, there are no obligations. It may or may not be more difficult to move from iOS to Android. True, one would be giving up a library of Apps that they paid for, but most of those costs are minor or negligible. Whereas, people in nineties were loathe to leave their thousands upon thousands of dollars in Windows only applications, leaving $50 bucks worth of iOS apps behind just isn’t that painful. Further, many of those iOS apps can be re-obtained for free on the Android side, so there is no loss at all. I think that a good argument can be made that one would be giving up superior iOS apps for inferior Android apps, but I also think that just doesn’t matter much. “Best” is not a marketing lock’-in when “good enough” is available for less or for free.

    In conclusion, I just don’t think that there is much of a software lock-in with either platform. Having said that, I think that Apple’s user interface, hardware designs and integrated ecosystem generate tremendous customer loyalty. Apple’s huge iOS library may not create lock-in, but it has a large role to play in Apple’s strategy of creating high customer loyalty.

         
  • Posted: 16 January 2011 06:48 PM #14

    Horace, true to his promise, has posted an article about this. It can be found Here:

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    Posted: 16 January 2011 07:49 PM #15

    I’m not sure how much our family of 4 have invested in Apps, but its considerably more than $50! I think the lockin to iOS is greater than you think.

    My 2 cents