?Wave and pay? technology for iPhone 5

  • Avatar

    Posted: 25 January 2011 06:29 PM

    Apple is expected to install ?wave and pay? technology for the next version of its iPhone, boosting mobile commerce and potentially giving the company a big piece of the multibillion-dollar transaction industry.

    The iPhone 5, due out this year, is likely to incorporate technology called Near-Field Communication, which incorporates financial account information and ties that data to specific devices, according to Asian suppliers and others who have been in talks with Apple.

    ?Wave and pay? technology for iPhone 5

    Currently linked on Drudge.

    Edit: Sorry, didn’t see related thread. Mods feel free to consolidate into other thread. - JD

    [ Edited: 25 January 2011 06:38 PM by JDSoCal ]

    Signature

    We filed for over 200 patents for all the inventions in iPhone and we intend to protect them. — Steve Jobs, 2007

         
  • Avatar

    Posted: 04 March 2011 12:11 PM #2

    GigaOm

    Verifone is reportedly… telling NFC World that it will include the technology into all of its new payment terminals…..

    It?s still a ways off before NFC-enabled phones replace credit cards, which are perfectly adequate for most people today. But the pieces continue to fall into place for NFC with Verifone doing its part for the cause.

    Not much of an update.  At least we keep it on the radar.

         
  • Avatar

    Posted: 04 March 2011 12:40 PM #3

    JDSoCal - 25 January 2011 10:29 PM

    Apple is expected to install ?wave and pay? technology for the next version of its iPhone, boosting mobile commerce and potentially giving the company a big piece of the multibillion-dollar transaction industry.

    The iPhone 5, due out this year, is likely to incorporate technology called Near-Field Communication, which incorporates financial account information and ties that data to specific devices, according to Asian suppliers and others who have been in talks with Apple.

    ?Wave and pay? technology for iPhone 5

    Currently linked on Drudge.

    Edit: Sorry, didn’t see related thread. Mods feel free to consolidate into other thread. - JD

    How does this work if you’re ID thefted? Like those new active credit cards that can be read through your pocket, your purse, your whatever that are increasing theft instead of reducing it?

    http://www.ksdk.com/news/article/243239/3/Credit-card-theft-without-touching-your-wallet

    Signature

    Black Swan Counter: 9 (Banks need money, Jobs needs a break, Geithner has no plan, Cuomo’s grandstanding, .Gov needs a hobby, GS works for money, flash crash, is that bubbling crude?).

    For those who look, a flash allows one to see farther.

         
  • Avatar

    Posted: 14 March 2011 01:07 AM #4

    My knee jerk reaction to ‘wave and pay’ is no way no how! There is just WAY WAY too much risk associated with this sort of technology. Apple should go VERY carefully into this technology.

      cheers
        JohnG

         
  • Posted: 14 March 2011 02:16 AM #5

    johnG - 14 March 2011 04:07 AM

    My knee jerk reaction to ‘wave and pay’ is no way no how! There is just WAY WAY too much risk associated with this sort of technology. Apple should go VERY carefully into this technology.

    My understanding is that NFC is far more secure than using credit cards which is why the industry is anxious to explore the technology.

         
  • Avatar

    Posted: 14 March 2011 03:25 PM #6

    Security schemes for personnel identification are discussed here:

    http://www.cs.cornell.edu/courses/cs513/2005fa/nnlauthpeople.html

    “Something you know, something you have, and something you are” is the holy trinity. If you can produce a scheme that includes all three, you stand the best chance that the person requesting access is indeed the person authorized access.

    A key is something you have - one level of security.

    A credit card with PIN in something you have and something you know - two levels of security. I can see this working with the NFC/“wave and pay” cell phone system. It mirrors a currently acceptable method (debit transactions).

    If you could get your NFC device to transmit a fingerprint map to the point of sale device, you could then place a previously authorized finger on the reader. Then you would have all three levels when combined with a PIN.

    The question is, how would you get your finger print into the NFC device profile? Fingerprint scanners at Apple stores? Or loaded with the phone at all points of sale? Would have to get placed in firmware to prevent wiping and hassles with a phone wipe/reinstall.

    Easier would be voice-print recognition. Walk up to pay, enable your device. The device says “speak your code phrase”. You speak it and the phone verifies your voice matches. Wave the device. The reader demands a PIN. Correct PIN from a properly enabled device means your goods are released.  Would still need to think about people with speech issues and other limitations.

    [ Edited: 14 March 2011 03:28 PM by rezonate ]

    Signature

    Use your powers for good.

         
  • Avatar

    Posted: 14 March 2011 08:12 PM #7

    FalKirk - 14 March 2011 05:16 AM
    johnG - 14 March 2011 04:07 AM

    My knee jerk reaction to ‘wave and pay’ is no way no how! There is just WAY WAY too much risk associated with this sort of technology. Apple should go VERY carefully into this technology.

    My understanding is that NFC is far more secure than using credit cards which is why the industry is anxious to explore the technology.

    Yeah, last time I checked, credit cards don’t have passwords like the iPhone and the App Store, just 3-digit “secret” codes, written on the back.

    Signature

    We filed for over 200 patents for all the inventions in iPhone and we intend to protect them. — Steve Jobs, 2007

         
  • Avatar

    Posted: 14 March 2011 08:38 PM #8

    rezonate - 14 March 2011 06:25 PM

    Security schemes for personnel identification are discussed here:

    http://www.cs.cornell.edu/courses/cs513/2005fa/nnlauthpeople.html

    “Something you know, something you have, and something you are” is the holy trinity. If you can produce a scheme that includes all three, you stand the best chance that the person requesting access is indeed the person authorized access.

    A key is something you have - one level of security.

    A credit card with PIN in something you have and something you know - two levels of security. I can see this working with the NFC/“wave and pay” cell phone system. It mirrors a currently acceptable method (debit transactions).

    If you could get your NFC device to transmit a fingerprint map to the point of sale device, you could then place a previously authorized finger on the reader. Then you would have all three levels when combined with a PIN.

    The question is, how would you get your finger print into the NFC device profile? Fingerprint scanners at Apple stores? Or loaded with the phone at all points of sale? Would have to get placed in firmware to prevent wiping and hassles with a phone wipe/reinstall.

    Easier would be voice-print recognition. Walk up to pay, enable your device. The device says “speak your code phrase”. You speak it and the phone verifies your voice matches. Wave the device. The reader demands a PIN. Correct PIN from a properly enabled device means your goods are released.  Would still need to think about people with speech issues and other limitations.

    I agree with your thought on security and IMO Apple is thinking along similar lines.  They have submited a number of patents in the biometric security and secure token area these can be tied into an app like Apple’s E wallet

    In one patent they talk about a new
    Point of Sale App

    The Biometric Sensor: Information also may be acquired through a biometric sensor (Patent Point # 45 of FIG.1), as for example:


    The biometric sensor may be located within the iPhone’s enclosure and may be used to verify or identify a user.
    The biometric sensor may be used in conjunction with a smartcard to verify the identity of a consumer.
    The biometric sensor may be used to identify a customer and obtain payment information for that customer by accessing a database of stored customer information.
    The biometric sensor may include a fingerprint reader or other feature recognition device and may operate in conjunction with a feature-processing program stored on the iPhone (see “Biometric Fingerprint Scanner” below for details).

         
  • Avatar

    Posted: 14 March 2011 08:52 PM #9

    How well would such a technology hold up at a white hat hacker conference ?

    How well would such a technology hold up against black hat conference ?

    How fast would Apple upgrade its technology to fix security holes ?  Historically, whenever it feels like it.

    How hard does Apple look for security holes ?  Poorly, in my experience.

         
  • Avatar

    Posted: 14 March 2011 09:01 PM #10

    Tetrachloride - 14 March 2011 11:52 PM

    How well would such a technology hold up at a white hat hacker conference ?

    How well would such a technology hold up against black hat conference ?

    How fast would Apple upgrade its technology to fix security holes ?  Historically, whenever it feels like it.

    How hard does Apple look for security holes ?  Poorly, in my experience.

    If you have the answers to those questions you can make lots of money.  It is safe to say that security is a cat and mouse kind of game.  All software has bugs and Apple is not historically fast at fixing every vulnerability but if you look at exploits in the wild on iOS I think they are doing better then some.  If the attackers are good enough and well funded, their is little security think Stuxnet.  Good thing that all the crooks aren’t state funded :wink: