Former Apple Exec calls new policies “a bit aggressive”, “good for Android”.

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    Posted: 17 February 2011 09:51 PM

    Cross Tim Schaaf off the short list for CEO succession. Points to Sr. Schaaf for making the most honest criticism of Apple he’s ever been allowed to make though!

         
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    Posted: 17 February 2011 10:20 PM #1

    Schaaf has nuances, but nothing fundamental.  Doesn’t say what is good for the consumer or that Apple’s profit margin on its investment of infrastructure and marketing. 

    The bears are getting desperate.

         
  • Posted: 17 February 2011 10:36 PM #2

    Fudmeister Brad’s topic of the day…

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    Posted: 18 February 2011 12:08 AM #3

    It’s just interesting, that’s all. Schaaf was at Apple from 1990 to 2005, oversaw about the only successful thing that endured from the pre-Jobs era, and was around as they built their music business from nothing. Sony obviously doesn’t have a “hush on Apple” policy for their execs in the wake of the Reader rejection. Interesting.

         
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    Posted: 18 February 2011 12:33 AM #4

    I’m reminded constantly using my common OS X apps of prime ideas of that 15-year era that got lost or shoved aside or went bankrupt.  That’s why I will keep OS 9 computers around for as long as they live.

         
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    Posted: 18 February 2011 01:18 AM #5

    And even more FUD from Bosco tonight! The things I do for you ornery bastages. This is one place where a refined sense of fairness and justice would serve AAPL investors well. In fact, given how you guys here are little starlets among the AAPL crowd for tossing your dart closer to outcomes last quarter than anyone else, you might even have some real influence that could save your stock’s ass if you used it.

    Let’s also consider the source of this article, who despite being under the (friend of the fortnight) Murdoch umbrella have a proud tradition of being hypercritical of Apple and its CEO in direct proportion and relation to Apple’s incursions into media space. It is clearly with 50 stones of distilled glee that the WSJ is bringing this news to us.

    Lessons that you could use your tiny influence to get back to the people at Apple who will probably inherit this mess in the coming months…

    1. Don’t piss off the media. Don’t tell them how to run their businesses. They’re the f-ing media.

    2. Don’t piss off the regulators doing basically the same crap that got your hand slapped the last time. It not only pisses off the government, but when people look back to the load of crap you sold them to justify your despicable behavior, they know you lied to them. You know, like about Adobe and Flash and third party tools.

    Speaking of which, 20 million phones flip the bird at Steve Jobs.

         
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    Posted: 18 February 2011 01:45 AM #6

    adamthompson3232 - 18 February 2011 05:37 AM

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    I genuinely love your posts, Bozo. Please keep them coming. And please come to Vegas for the $300 (or maybe $400) party. I will even buy you a glass of your favorite drink with a pittance of my massive gains from AAPL.

    I’m really feeling the love between you two gents!  :-D

         
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    Posted: 18 February 2011 01:58 AM #7

    adamthompson3232 - 18 February 2011 05:55 AM
    madmaxroi - 18 February 2011 05:45 AM
    adamthompson3232 - 18 February 2011 05:37 AM

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    I genuinely love your posts, Bozo. Please keep them coming. And please come to Vegas for the $300 (or maybe $400) party. I will even buy you a glass of your favorite drink with a pittance of my massive gains from AAPL.

    I’m really feeling the love between you two gents!  :-D

    But I said I love his posts and would buy him a drink:)

    Promise not to put anything in it?

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    AAPL: to boldly go where no stock has gone before

         
  • Posted: 18 February 2011 02:09 AM #8

    Bosco (Brad Hutchings) - 18 February 2011 05:18 AM

    And even more FUD from Bosco tonight! The things I do for you ornery bastages. This is one place where a refined sense of fairness and justice would serve AAPL investors well. In fact, given how you guys here are little starlets among the AAPL crowd for tossing your dart closer to outcomes last quarter than anyone else, you might even have some real influence that could save your stock’s ass if you used it.

    And the latest AFB index of expected share price performance will likely prove conservative.

    It’s Android that will, in part, propel Apple’s share price higher. The existence of Android handsets, the number of units sold and the emergence of Android tablets will keep regulators in check. There are alternatives for consumers and with all of the talk of Android’s success there’s no credible basis for claims the iPhone, iPad or any other Apple product is stifling competition. Publishers have other avenues to exploit if they don’t like Apple’s terms and the numbers of Android handsets sold and the emerging market for Android tablets prove it.

    Apple’s problem isn’t the company’s approach to the market but the company’s inability to make sufficient quantities of product. Consumers have choice and nothing about Apple’s terms in any way restricts customers from choosing a competing product or restricts developers or publishers from releasing product for competing platforms.

    Apple doesn’t need a majority position in any of its product markets to double the company’s share price over the next two years. Apple only needs to make enough product to meet demand. Android is Apple’s best defense again regulatory incursion.

         
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    Posted: 18 February 2011 02:21 AM #9

    DT: probably a reasonable guess with US regulators. The EU doesn’t care so much about market share when looking at what is clearly jerk behavior.

         
  • Posted: 18 February 2011 03:07 AM #10

    Bosco (Brad Hutchings) - 18 February 2011 06:21 AM

    DT: probably a reasonable guess with US regulators. The EU doesn’t care so much about market share when looking at what is clearly jerk behavior.

    Perceptions of jerk behavior are subjective.  LOL

    You and I have been around long enough to remember Microsoft raising unreasonableness to an art form. Remember the botched effort to claim Internet Explorer was an integral part of Windows? That company pursed reasons for and collected consent decrees like they were NCAA conference trophies.

    Apple will no doubt push the limits. In my view the determiner is how quickly the company backs off when confronted with a compelling reason to draw the ire of regulators and to avoid formal inquiries. As of yet I don’t see a case in which Apple has aggressively used its market position to hinder competition.

    You’re right. The EU is a different animal altogether. Past actions have hinted EU regulators don’t like devices and exclusive avenues for content sales for those devices such as iTunes. But the question still comes back to whether or not there is real competition in the market. Smartly, Apple will cede lower margin segments of the market to competitors in the pursuit of higher profit sales and Apple can claim consistency in its market approach.

    The Android eco-system is a counter balance to Apple’s market approach and I believe there’s plenty of market remaining and available before Apple finds itself in a position in which it must modify its model to avoid regulatory threats and resulting oversight.

         
  • Posted: 18 February 2011 04:50 AM #11

    I’m an individual. I am fully aware that the bad things people say about Apple’s “abuse of power” could be true. But thus far since SJ returned Apple has never wavered from its commitment to provide the best for the INDIVIDUAL human being. Apple could turn on a dime and become evil using their power. But so far, what they have done has been, and continues to be, spectacularly good for the individual. Most people aren’t actually stupid, and they are learning to trust Apple.

    Apple only fights to control its own platform. Not anyone else’s Apple needs to stop others poisoning its platform, which is what Bosco obsessively desires. There’s always rich pickings for the greedy when something large and successful is destroyed, whether it’s the Amazon Rain forest or Apple Inc. That’s why Apple has to fight to survive, and probably always will.

    Bosco is mistaken in thinking Apple is his enemy. That’s like hating your schoolteacher because she maintains discipline.  Apple supports, indeed needs, a large open platform environment in which to operate. But it takes very few covert deals behind closed doors to control a market, shutting out competition and innovation. Apple isn’t opposing Flash on PC’s or mobile phones; it’s opposing the destruction of its own platform and a cartel of mega-corps then destroying what Apple has always been about - empowering the individual.

    Apple is the only one fighting for the individual against incumbent megacorps. And Bosco wants them dead.

    So what has Apple done for the individual?

    - Provided an Internet Explorer free corner of the web. Forcing content providers to gradually abandon IE-only content in favour of standard compliant content. Without Apple, Firefox would not be the success it is today.

    - Done the work to figure out an interface that works with a small screen and pudgy fingers while we walk about. Look at mobile internet (including Android) before iPhone and after iPhone. Android (and everyone else) copied IOS and the work Apple took the time to do, that Nokia, Microsoft, RIM etc with a five year head start had completely failed to do. Take a look at Android the day iPhone was launched. They threw it away and copied Apple.

    - Delivered the full web experience on a mobile device, and given away the Webkit work that enabled it. Nokia, RIM, Google all used Webkit to make their mobile browsers. Including those 20 million mobile Flash 10.1 devices. Android is built on IOS.

    - Defeated the power of the carrier cartels, kickstarting the open mobile internet. Android is built on that work, and would be nowhere without it.

    - Brought about today’s user-friendly music download market. Kicking off with “Rip, Mix, Burn”, following up with Fairplay and sensible rights-in-perpetuity to your purchased downloads. It was to stop Apple being the only music retailer on the planet that the music biz abandoned copy protection, and restrictive usage rights that required re-syncing with central servers to keep your music playing. Being able to easily buy unprotected music downloads was forced by Apple’s use of its platform power, not the actions of Amazon or the Music Business.

    - created the only functional, trusted market for software, enabling individual developers to make a living, and even grow to challenge large competitors; something they have almost entirely failed to do when providing their own distribution, marketing, copy protection.

    etc.

    The point is, Apple is STILL interposing itself between us and the megacorps that control our lives. And they are still changing the world for the better by what they do. Every time Apple wins, the defeated megacorp has to give away even more to have any business that doesn’t go through Apple. Short sighted and unimaginative people constantly see the resulting situation as Apple trying to control and milk the customer or content creator.

    So - the fuss about Apple requiring content to be available through iTunes and requiring it to be no more expensive or restrictive via iTunes. That is elementary protection of a functional ecosystem. Large and sophisticated ecosystems (rain forest or Apple) ARE very susceptible to poisoning or destruction. So those clauses are elementary and essential protection for Apple.

    Without such clauses, the music biz would have wiped iTunes off the map years ago. As it was, they gave Amazon more than a year of cheaper, non-copy protected downloads to challenge iTunes. I am sure Apple has (had) the legal right to substantial damages. But money isn’t what Apple wanted; they wanted their “most favoured nation” clause to be honoured.

    I look forward to more world-changing power plays from Apple’s management - creating a better world for the individual.
    Meantime my Mac’s Flash plugin still crashes nearly every day, as Safari 5 loves to remind me.

    Quite a rant!

         
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    Posted: 18 February 2011 05:40 AM #12

    Bosco (Brad Hutchings) - 18 February 2011 06:21 AM

    DT: probably a reasonable guess with US regulators. The EU doesn’t care so much about market share when looking at what is clearly jerk behavior.

    Wow, you must be one of those Apple-hating geniuses who think Apple should just give away one-click access to 130 million credit cards on file. Because, you know, Apple has no fiduciary duty to make shareholders more money. Their duty is to be perceived as being nice guys.

    Thank God you aren’t running Apple - or my portfolio.

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    Posted: 18 February 2011 12:50 PM #13

    @sleepygeek, you’ve expained the “myth of Apple” quite well. But it’s a myth. Take phones. If you’re a 20-something hot chick who needs to have an iPhone, I’d recommend it. If not, I’d recommend a decent Android phone. Why? Because it can read you text messages while you walk or drive or just have the phone lying around while you’re cooking, access Flash websites in a pinch (or more than a pinch), anyone with an IQ over about 60 can swap out the battery (for less than $50 in most cases).

    Take tablets. Someone (probably Steve) decided that widget apps should not be allowed. That’s a rule in the garden. No widget apps. No using that beautiful $500 screen to show tweets, email subjects, a clock, and security camera footage from your front door at the same time.

    What are the revenue justifications of those? How do those rules empower the individual? These are things you probably need to reconcile because Apple’s sales and loyalty stem much more from the myth of Apple than that its products are objectively more useful or easier. iPad was unique for a year, but it is no longer. There aren’t enough pet rocks like iPhone and iPad that Apple can do that every year.

    BTW, I don’t want Apple “dead”. I hope that an Apple that behaves like this one settles on a small niche of customers and doesn’t influence the industry other than as an example of how not to behave. I’d be happy to buy from an Apple that knew where its lane is and that there are other lanes with other participants large and small nearby.

    [ Edited: 18 February 2011 12:52 PM by Bosco (Brad Hutchings) ]      
  • Posted: 18 February 2011 02:13 PM #14

    Bosco (Brad Hutchings) - 18 February 2011 04:50 PM

    Take tablets. Someone (probably Steve) decided that widget apps should not be allowed.

    I think it was based on the experience of running widgets on the original iPhone slowing iOS and making it unresponsive. All things that people moan about with Android.

    What are the revenue justifications of those? How do those rules empower the individual?

    Everyone talks about the responsiveness of the iPad. Everyone marvels at it’s battery life. These experiences outweigh the ability of widgets with the current processor and battery.

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    Posted: 18 February 2011 02:55 PM #15

    Also keep in mind that iOS is always evolving.
    4 years ago you could have wailed that Apple doesn’t allow copy/paste on their phone.  Solved.
    3 years ago you could have wailed that Apple doesn’t allow 3rd party apps on their phone.  Solved.
    2 years ago you could have wailed that Apple doesn’t allow any form of multitasking.  Solved.
    1 year ago you could have wailed that Apple doesn’t allow 3rd party development tools like Air.  Solved.

    Things like notifications and widgets, I am confident that Apple will come up with an elegant solution.  One of their greatest strengths is focusing on core features first, getting them right, and then moving onto “window-dressing” types of things.