Mustn?t all Android devices always be taboo in the Enterprise?  (Ergo, won?t only iOS, BB,  WM7 &/or WebOS ultimately be the dominant mobile OS?s&

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    Posted: 04 March 2011 05:06 PM

    As we watch the iPad explode into the Enterprise, government, academia and elsewhere, and we debate how well its pad-rival systems will compete in this expansion, I can’t see how there could ever be any room at all for Android in the Enterprise and government (+/- academia). 

    Since Google must always exploit/capitalize on its users’ personal data, and since Google’s webcloud engine is the lifeblood of Android (Linux is only Android’s skeleton & Java only its musculature), how can any corporation’s ITO afford to tolerate any functional interface between his/her corporation’s information system and an Android portal to Google’s datamining suction?  (And if those institutions could somehow contrive to effectivlely block that datamining suction on their Android devices, how could Google afford to support them without getting any compensation from it?)

    So, if there thus could never be any room at all for Android in the Enterprise, etc., how much longer will Android be able to continue successfully competing in the world at large against its rivals (iOS, BB,  WM7 &/or WebOS), which have no such inherent bureaucratic firewall blocking them out of widespread incorporation into institutions?  Mightn’t Android thus eventually be relegated to a Linux-like niche role outside the social mainstream?

    [ Edited: 04 March 2011 05:40 PM by BurmaYank ]

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    Posted: 04 March 2011 05:21 PM #1

    Hey, may I modestly say “I’m an institution also”  and “I won’t stand for any corporation forcefully data-mining my life.”  I try my best to avoid Google OS or software for that reason.  I was noticing my own Google search results gradually shrinking in scope over the past few years.  They think they are giving me results that suit me, but really they are just closing horizons and limiting my choices.  I hate advertising, but I really hate advertising that has me labelled.

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    Posted: 04 March 2011 06:10 PM #2

    This is some seriously extreme irony that pops up over and over and over again lately.  Apple finding its fortunes outside of the consumer market.  Being approached by business.

    People like and respect Google products, but they’re increasingly wary.

    Android, let’s face it, is very, very, very unfriendly to enterprise compared to iOS, because of its “openness.”  Devices that don’t require the device or a better-trusted designated sideloading computer/app in order to autoinstall apps over the cloud?  That’s spooky stuff for CIOs and CTOs.

    Once iPhone started building in enterprise support, the writing was already on the wall.  The competition think it’s easy to catch up to what’s Apple’s been carefully building, but it’s just not that simple - Apple’s been carefully building because that’s just what you have to do to make a product that works and fits in various settings. 

    Google’s “datamining” is one thing - deploying Android devices when you don’t have the same assurances that the vendor (which raises other issues about to who the “vendor” is) has privacy protections and better filtering for bad code (after the malware incident with the duplicated apps lately, you can’t deny that) and dead-simple works-from-anywhere ID/location/remote wipe of devices as an extra safety blanket?  iOS isn’t perfect by any means, but it’s sure “just works” better for IT and enterprise.

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    Posted: 05 March 2011 11:35 AM #3

    I hadn’t really thought about Android being limited in Enterprise sales due to how Google exploits user data.  Does anyone work for a large company that is rolling out Android in any significant quantities?  How about iOS?

    It would be entertaining if the financial gurus on this board could run with this argument for a minute and assume the following over the course of a few years:

      * iOS has 90% market share in phones, tablets, and whatever other new devices come up
      * OSX replaces Windows as the dominant OS for consumer and enterprise, again say 90%
      * Apple is still the sole manufacturer of devices running the above
      * iTunes has 90% of the distribution of Apps, Books, Music, Movies

    OK, now, what is AAPL at?

         
  • Posted: 05 March 2011 11:58 AM #4

    Google has mail and calendaring systems that they sell to academia.  My college is about to buy it.  They do not practice exploit the personal information of users in these systems, I am told by someone on the committee evaluating several products.  I have no details other than that, and being close to retirement I am not pursuing a lot of detail on it.  Implementation will happen as I ride off into the sunset.

         
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    Posted: 07 March 2011 11:30 AM #5

    roni - 05 March 2011 03:58 PM

    “Google has mail and calendaring systems that they sell to academia.  My college is about to buy it.  They do not practice exploit the personal information of users in these systems, I am told…”

    That’s encouraging to know, but does that really provide enough information control for institutional needs on an Android device?

    In order for institutions to adopt an Android device as an integrated component of their institutional information management systems, won’t they need much more security over personal/institutional information on that Android device than just what their specially-modified Google/academic mail and calendaring systems might be able to offer?  Doesn’t Google still need all its licensed (i.e., US & European, at any rate) Android devices to make money for Google by exploiting all user’s websurfing histories? 
    - If so, mustn’t Android’s architecture therefore necessarily be inherently designed with too much external/foreign information-sharing proclivity & innate openness for most organization’s IT Systems to adequately control?
    - If not, mustn’t that special institutional Android device’s specially-modified OS architecture therefore need to be so fundamentally re-designed, in order to (“artificially”) block such normal-to-Android external/foreign information-sharing & openness, that it would no longer work like Android for many/most Android apps?  And how much would such an institution need to compensate Google for the privilege of depriving Google of all that data-mining revenue from those specially locked-down Android devices?

    [ Edited: 07 March 2011 09:05 PM by BurmaYank ]

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  • Posted: 07 March 2011 10:19 PM #6

    This is another topic that’s best addressed in the context of the industries in which Apple operates. I’ve moved this topic to 1 Infinite Loop.

         
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    Posted: 08 March 2011 12:02 PM #7

    Daily Gala - 05 March 2011 03:35 PM

    Does anyone work for a large company that is rolling out Android in any significant quantities?  How about iOS?

    I work in the IT department of a company. Not exactly ‘large’ but a few hundred employees scattered at half a dozen sites across the provence. When they give someone a phone it’s a BlackBerry. On the company web site they had instructions for setting up a BlackBerry to access company e-mail and web sites.  For a long time that was it. You wanted something else, you were on your own. Then last year they added instructions for the iPhone. A lot of the people here, especially VIPs have bought their own iPhones.

    However I have heard from my boss that some things are off the table. I have been told we ‘don’t know how to set up’ Android devices. Also, interestingly, we have a serious push to eliminate GoogleDocs over security concerns. Lastly, I was told that if anyone has a question about Chrome “We don’t support it, period”.

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  • Posted: 08 March 2011 12:35 PM #8

    geoduck - 08 March 2011 04:02 PM
    Daily Gala - 05 March 2011 03:35 PM

    Does anyone work for a large company that is rolling out Android in any significant quantities?  How about iOS?

    I work in the IT department of a company. Not exactly ‘large’ but a few hundred employees scattered at half a dozen sites across the provence. When they give someone a phone it’s a BlackBerry.

    I work at a school district, though I personally am not the mail server admin. I find it amusing how our supported devices are basically the opposite of the corporate world. The one device they do not support at all is Blackberry because it can’t talk directly to the server without them adding more infrastructure. iOS and Android, on the other hand, work just great and there are setup instructions for both. (We use Zimbra as our mail/calendar server, and it supports mobile devices running Microsoft Exchange ActiveSync.)

         
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    Posted: 08 March 2011 01:34 PM #9

    I dont think the adoption rate of iOS is a strategic effort by Apple, rather a welcome side effect.
    I work within a business environment that spans the globe with close to 1K employees and the IT dept and many of the middle managers are pro Blackberry and Windows. Mainly because this is what they are comfortable with and trained to use.

    And recently for the past 12 months the push for iPad and iPhones into our world has been from high level executives that just wanted something easy to use. As the C level execs starting using their personal devices and coercing IT to enable Exchange use on their iPhones the underlings all follow suit, as they do in a corporate world, and voila Blackberry is now replaced by iPhone. And the employees start finding other uses in the environment that integrate into the business.

    Interestingly enough if you ask the CEO if it was a strategic business move to guide the company towards this smart device or what his thought process was to suddenly move towards the iPhone. His remark is my teenage daughter recommended it.

         
  • Posted: 08 March 2011 02:23 PM #10

    richardlo - 08 March 2011 05:34 PM

    I dont think the adoption rate of iOS is a strategic effort by Apple, rather a welcome side effect.
    I work within a business environment that spans the globe with close to 1K employees and the IT dept and many of the middle managers are pro Blackberry and Windows. Mainly because this is what they are comfortable with and trained to use.

    And recently for the past 12 months the push for iPad and iPhones into our world has been from high level executives that just wanted something easy to use. As the C level execs starting using their personal devices and coercing IT to enable Exchange use on their iPhones the underlings all follow suit, as they do in a corporate world, and voila Blackberry is now replaced by iPhone. And the employees start finding other uses in the environment that integrate into the business.

    Interestingly enough if you ask the CEO if it was a strategic business move to guide the company towards this smart device or what his thought process was to suddenly move towards the iPhone. His remark is my teenage daughter recommended it.

    Your post is 100% anecdotal, but it is also terribly insightful. Nicely done.

         
  • Posted: 08 March 2011 02:41 PM #11

    richardlo - 08 March 2011 05:34 PM

    Interestingly enough if you ask the CEO if it was a strategic business move to guide the company towards this smart device or what his thought process was to suddenly move towards the iPhone. His remark is my teenage daughter recommended it.

    Haha! Funny as that sounds, I bet that is behind a lot of this. Here’s another anecdote…

    At one of my buildings, the head custodian checks his work mail on his personal iPhone. At the other location the head custodian uses an Android phone.

    I’m particularly interested by this because the custodians are some of the people whose jobs have the least to do with technology… and yet they have chosen to be connected to work mail in a way that only business execs and geeks used to care about.

    Is it unnecessary? Perhaps. But it also frees them from constantly going back to their computer to check for new help requests, etc. In other words, when computers are a communication tool but not the primary focus of your job, a mobile device can help keep you connected without messing around with traditional computers and their shortcomings (such as being not-so-portable.)