Apple iPad will fail in the enterprise: Dell

  • Posted: 29 March 2011 12:58 AM

    Apple iPad will fail in the enterprise: Dell

    Despite the iPad’s long lead in the enterprise market, Apple’s tablet PC performer will not last long according to an increasingly bullish Dell.

    Why, pray tell, is Dell “increasingly bullish”? Or perhaps that was a misprint and the line was supposed to say that Dell was “increasing their bullshit.”

    Speaking to CIO Australia in Sydney, Dell?s global head of marketing for large enterprises and public organisations, Andy Lark, said while the first iPad had achieved one million sales just 28 days after the device first became available in the US and precipitated the explosion in tablet PCs, it would ultimately fail in the enterprise.

    ?I couldn?t be happier that Apple has created a market and built up enthusiasm but longer term, open, capable and affordable will win, not closed, high price and proprietary,? Lark said.

    What? What? What? Did I inadvertently link to an interview from the nineties? No? Then why is Lark saying that capable will win when his product is less capable than the iPad? Why is he saying that affordable will win when his product is more expensive than the iPad? Why is he saying that “open” will win when he’s peddling a proprietary solution?

    ?Apple is great if you?ve got a lot of money and live on an island.

    WTF? What island have you been on, Mr. Lark, where they didn’t bother to tell you that the iPad costs less than your product?

    It?s not so great if you have to exist in a diverse, open, connected enterprise; simple things become quite complex.?

    If you mean that Dell makes simple things complex then yes, I agree with you. Otherwise I’m calling BS.

    While Apple had entered the businesses as a consumer device, Lark claimed Dell had taken an enterprise approach toward tablet PCs, which would ultimately give the company, which has a major stake in Microsoft Windows and the desktop PC market, an edge.

    Are we talking about “proprietary” Windows? I thought open beats proprietary?

    The cost of Apple products was another deterrent to iPad deployments, with Lark claiming that a the economics on a fully kitted iPad did not add up.

    Damn, damn, double-damn! I have GOT to stop taking naps in my Hot Tub Time machine. Every time I do, Dell starts talking about price like it was 1994.

    ?An iPad with a keyboard, a mouse and a case [means] you?ll be at $1500 or $1600; that?s double of what you?re paying,” he claimed. “That?s not feasible.?

    Not only is that not feasible, Mr. Lark, it’s not true and it’s also INSANE! Let’s ignore that fact that a keyboard, case and mouse don’t cost an additional 1,100 dollars. Let’s concentrate instead on the fact that NOBODY USESS A MOUSE WITH A TABLET and that you, Mr. Lark, don’t know what the hell you’re on about.

    Despite the company’s history with Microsoft, it had embraced both Windows Phone 7 and Android operating systems offerings as the market was increasingly moving away from Apple’s iOS4 offering.

    Yeah, because implementing TWO operating systems that don’t work with tablets is a much better value proposition than implementing only ONE operating system that won’t work with tablets.

    ??Our strategy is multi-OS,” Lark said. “We will do Windows 7 coupled with Android Honeycomb, and we?re really excited.

    ...but no one else is.

    We think that giving people that choice is very important.?

    Choice by itself is meaningless. In fact, unfettered choice is actually harmful. What’s meaningful is GOOD choices and it’s Dell’s job to make those good choices not just fob them off on your long suffering customers.

    Look-ee hear, Lark, my man. You’ve got a lot of gaul. Dell has done nothing during the past five years but throw a plethora of poorly made devices at the wall in the hopes that one of them would stick. None of them have. If you want to promote Dell, that’s fine, that’s your job. But don’t be claiming that open, capable and affordable will win when you’re peddling expensive, proprietary clap trap. If you want to know who’s going to win, go down to your local Apple store and see how long the lines for the iPad 2 are. You may even decide to buy one. But whatever you do, don’t ask them to sell you a mouse. It’s just not done.

         
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    Posted: 29 March 2011 01:16 AM #1

    Relative of the Macalope?  smile

    It’s hilarious.  It’s also Dell. 

    “Dude, you’re getting…nowhere, fast.”

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    Posted: 29 March 2011 01:26 AM #2

    Falkirk, your Dell dishing is making me go lol to bed!

    Its just amazing the posturing going on, first Samsung, now Dell, even Rim.  Everybody is just way better at tablets than Apple - in the future when they actually have a tablet that is.

    Actually, Dell already did a tablet, the Streak - but that one seemed to go right by me.  Can someone remind me about the success of the Streak because I might not have been paying attention.

         
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    Posted: 29 March 2011 01:50 AM #3

    Every last one of the tablets (not so much smartphones, where Android is undeniably better than so much of the tripe that used to pass for smartphones) has a singular problem.

    N.I.H.  (Not Invented Here)

    We all know this, they don’t.  The core off-the-shelf construction of every tablet but Apple’s inevitably leads to numerous detractions from the overall user experience.  Open source, schmopen source.  If you don’t understand every facet of the tablet’s design, from software (Apple will win every time) to hardware (same here…for example, Apple knows every aspect of the A5, everyone else says “eh, toss the Tegra 2/whatever in there), you will never have as polished an experience as the integrator.  And, as it turns out, neither will you have any significant cost advantages despite having the OS for “free”.  There’s more to it, but that’s the nutshell for me.  Apple has tablets wrapped up for the time being.

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    Posted: 29 March 2011 02:00 AM #4

    If all else fails, use provocation, right? Seems a rather awkward attempt by Dell to talk smack of Apple. However, I’m not paying much attention: appears a rather marginal set of comments by some marginal Dell exec in a marginal publication (no offense to Down Under).

    Microsoft’s Stores (ridiculed in another thread) are a more blatant provocation.

    Microsoft’s deal with Nokia is a actually a more decent attempt to get some legs, given the firms foothold on the enterprise market, but they’re not shouting about it like Dell does here.

    Filed under “claim chowder”. (We’ll see in a year)

         
  • Posted: 29 March 2011 02:07 AM #5

    Mav - 29 March 2011 04:16 AM

    Relative of the Macalope?  smile

    I can’t say else my mythical horns may fall off.

    Honestly, with a Dell representative giving you material that good, it’s hard not to simply fill in the blanks and mercilessly mock him like there’s no tomorrow.

         
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    Posted: 29 March 2011 02:47 AM #6

    I hope this is a true representation of how Dell actually thinks. It’ll make Apple’s job easier if they continue on their current path.

         
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    Posted: 29 March 2011 08:14 AM #7

    FalKirk - 29 March 2011 03:58 AM

    Apple iPad will fail in the enterprise: Dell

    Speaking to CIO Australia in Sydney, Dell?s global head of marketing for large enterprises and public organisations, Andy Lark, said while the first iPad had achieved one million sales just 28 days after the device first became available in the US and precipitated the explosion in tablet PCs, it would ultimately fail in the enterprise.

    ?Apple is great if you?ve got a lot of money and live on an island.

    Was this guy not paying attention to where he was? He was in Australia, an island, talking to CIOs who probably have a sizable budget. Did he just tell them Apple is great for them?

         
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    Posted: 29 March 2011 10:58 AM #8

    I’m not typical enterprise, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night. I’ve been trying to navigate the .mil/.edu conundrum for about a year and have to say getting Apple devices in service is a real uphill battle. The major stumbling blocks are the lock to iTunes, consumer model of one commercial app - one user, inability to enable NSA-secure WIFI and very kludgy handling of e-documents. Most enterprise customers will have no problem enabling iTunes in their standard image, have more lax rules about acquisitions, have “secure enough” WIFI, and might have better corporate document management in the cloud (sharepoint or similar). Everything else is just better: service, lifecycle, initial cost (vs laptop), ease of use. Normal enterprise will continue to scarf these up like candy.

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  • Posted: 29 March 2011 11:14 AM #9

    I’m trying not to be unkind, but where has this guy been living? iOS already has mainstream IT adoption due to the iPhone and the cost of the iPad is more than competitive.

    But if one is looking out from inside the Windows Alcatraz and is unaware of the increasing penetration of Macs, iPhones and now iPads in the enterprise market it’s an expected point of view.

    As for Dell, the company has moved aggressively into services and the company’s biggest growth markets for PCs are in developing nations. Let him keep this point of view and be unpleasantly surprised as Apple devices pull out the economic rug upon which he is standing.

         
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    Posted: 29 March 2011 12:27 PM #10

    rezonate - 29 March 2011 01:58 PM

    I’m not typical enterprise, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night. I’ve been trying to navigate the .mil/.edu conundrum for about a year and have to say getting Apple devices in service is a real uphill battle. The major stumbling blocks are the lock to iTunes, consumer model of one commercial app - one user, inability to enable NSA-secure WIFI and very kludgy handling of e-documents. Most enterprise customers will have no problem enabling iTunes in their standard image, have more lax rules about acquisitions, have “secure enough” WIFI, and might have better corporate document management in the cloud (sharepoint or similar). Everything else is just better: service, lifecycle, initial cost (vs laptop), ease of use. Normal enterprise will continue to scarf these up like candy.

    I too grew up battling these issues and understand your pain.  My guess is that a solution which works for .gov would meet most of the corporate security requirements.  How are you doing mobile device management?  Are you using Apple’s configuration profile architecture and iPhone Configuration Utility to restrict access to certain features or third party solution.  How do you do the smart card stuff.  Do you use a FIPS 140-2 setup like Nanocrypto .  Just wondering how fast things are moving, since IMO security is probably the long pole for wide spread corporate adoption to include .gov.  I saw that Obama was using an iPad so some of the hurdles must be failing into place.

         
  • Posted: 29 March 2011 07:44 PM #11

    This explains why Dell has been doing so well lately.

         
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    Posted: 29 March 2011 08:08 PM #12

    I can’t remember: Did Dell win the race to the bottom?

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    Posted: 29 March 2011 08:19 PM #13

    Eric Landstrom - 29 March 2011 11:08 PM

    I can’t remember: Did Dell win the race to the bottom?

    Back in 2009, this story at PC World

    Three years ago, the number of computer makers aggressively vying for your desktop—from giants like Dell, HP, and IBM and second-tier vendors like Acer, NEC, and Toshiba to lesser-known little guys like Axis, MidWest Micro, and Premio—was almost overwhelming.

    Fast-forward to today. I recently hit the Web to comparison-shop for a Pentium 4 system. Six searches and several different price-comparison engines later, my list totaled a scant five vendors: Dell, Gateway, HP/Compaq, IBM, and Sony. My local retail stores didn’t fare much better, offering most of the same brands, plus a few smaller players and one or two of the stores’ own varieties.

    Sure, you can find other manufacturers out there. But such companies as CyberMax, Packard Bell, and Quantex have gone belly-up in the past few years, while other vendors have been acquired, merged with other companies, or shifted their business model in pursuit of more-profitable pastures. All in all, there’s no denying that the PC marketplace has undergone some seriously Darwinian economic pressures in the past few years.

    More kinds of hitting bottom in the same story

    But with fewer competing vendors around, the bargain basement may have bottomed out. According to Gartner analyst Martin Reynolds, consumers should not expect PC prices to drop much lower than they already have.

    “Prices are aggressively low already, and there isn’t a lot of room for manufacturers to cut,” Reynolds explains. “The competition has been a bit too intense, as manufacturers lose money to make money—hence the amazing deals that sometimes pop up.”

    So, innovation and prices were at lows as of 2009 as far as non-Apple makers can throw a stick in the Windoze desktop and laptop arenas.  (hurls grammar book into the salad bowl)

    [ Edited: 29 March 2011 08:24 PM by Tetrachloride ]      
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    Posted: 29 March 2011 08:28 PM #14

    Eric Landstrom - 29 March 2011 11:08 PM

    I can’t remember: Did Dell win the race to the bottom?

    LOL Knew you would come out of hiding

         
  • Posted: 29 March 2011 10:17 PM #15

    Isn’t it true that the lack of performance level by Dell machines and their Windows brethren have made it possible for Apple’s iPad to be rapidly adopted by those in enterprise? There are those who really want to get things done, even if they have to buy their own work processor.