Google VS Apple

  • Posted: 16 May 2011 11:18 AM #91

    Lyne noted that there are no security software available for the iPhone in the Apple?s app store. The company is not letting users protect themselves, Lyne said.

    This is rich. Apple is doing its customers a disservice by not allowing them to pay money for anti-virus software that can serve no purpose on a device that has no viruses to defend against. I guess Apple should also be chided for not selling life-preservers to people who live in the desert. “Oh no! They’re not letting people pay money to protect themselves from non-existant threats!”

    [ Edited: 17 May 2011 10:44 AM by FalKirk ]      
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    Posted: 16 May 2011 11:15 PM #92

    Unfair business practices.  Hundreds of millions in revenues on the line.  John Grisham declines offer to do the play-by-play.

    Aside:  According to family lore, one of the high ranking researchers in Motorola in the 70’s and 1980’s came from my town and therefore was an acquaintance of my dad’s.

         
  • Posted: 17 May 2011 09:37 AM #93

    FalKirk - 16 May 2011 02:18 PM

    Lyne noted that there are no security software available for the iPhone in the Apple?s app store. The company is not letting users protect themselves, Lyne said.

    This is rich. Apple is doing its customers a disservice by not allowing them to buy useless software that would do nothing and protect them from nothing.

    This is rich. Apple is doing its customers a disservice by not allowing them to pay money for anti-virus software that can serve no purpose on a device that has no viruses to defend against. I guess Apple should also be chided for not selling life-preservers to people who live in the desert. “Oh no! They’re not letting people pay money to protect themselves from non-existant threats!”

    It seems there’s a greater need among Android users to protect themselves. BBC news is breaking a story that researchers have found that 99% of Android handsets are “leaking” personal data.  The unencrypted data was fixed with Version 2.3.4 yet less than 1% of Google users have upgraded the OS.  Incredible.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-13422308

         
  • Posted: 17 May 2011 09:42 AM #94

    Gizmodo is headlining the story now, calling the personal data leakage an “epidemic.”  This kind of press coverage should sell another 1-2M iPhones this quarter.  :-D

    http://gizmodo.com/5802617/androids-account-info-leakage-epidemic

         
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    Posted: 17 May 2011 10:09 AM #95

    Mercel - 17 May 2011 12:37 PM

    It seems there’s a greater need among Android users to protect themselves. BBC news is breaking a story that researchers have found that 99% of Android handsets are “leaking” personal data.  The unencrypted data was fixed with Version 2.3.4 yet less than 1% of Google users have upgraded the OS.  Incredible.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-13422308

    I think saying that “Less than 1% of Android users have upgraded the OS” is misssing something really important. THEY CAN’T UPGRADE

    Unlike iOS devices where Apple provides the patches and upgrades to users, upgrades to Android devices are based on the carrier pushing the upgrades directly to the phone. This means, the device that was purchased a year ago will need the manufacturer to first make necessary changes to the OS to work on that phone, then the carrier will have to certify / modify the code again, and finally the carrier will have to push the phone out to the user’s handset.

    The problem here is that there is no incentive for the manufacturer to keep updating the OS on the older phones. Carriers aren’t too keen or inclined to spend the effort to review the code and push the upgrades to the handset.

    This is only true for upgrades.

    There are no patches on Android. It’s not like on iOS where a bug is found with location data being stored locally in clear text prompts Apple to release a minor bug fix patch. Android users rely on a full upgrarde that will probably never come.

    This entire issue really comes down to one issue: Fragmentation.

    Even Google is feeling the pain of Android fragmentation.

         
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    Posted: 18 May 2011 01:09 AM #96

    Google Cannot Successfully Compete with Apple
    by John Martellaro | 2:08 PM, May. 17th, 2011

    Is Google Apple?s competitor? It certainly seems like it when we read about Android?s smartphone market share. Or the new Chromebooks from Google. In reality, Google isn?t competing with Apple at all, and, in fact, never can.

    As we all know so very well, Apple is a company that excels in the user experience. Advanced technology is made usable via superb software ? the user interface. Because of that linkage between the hardware and software, Apple builds hardware that we want to own. Covet might not be an exaggeration.

    Google doesn?t sell hardware, and they don?t sell the user experience. The goal of Google is to make money by giving away free services, like search, that make money on the back end with ads. In essence, we are drawn to Google because their products are free, but we?re left with that lingering, nagging feeling that we?ve given up something valuable, our privacy, location, our likes and dislikes, for free services.

    http://www.macobserver.com/tmo/article/google_cannot_successfully_compete_with_apple/

         
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    Posted: 18 May 2011 01:18 AM #97

    Good article from Martellaro.

    Who cares more about the ordinary customer?  You can approach that question with some cynicism, but when a reasonable person is asked to choose between Apple and Google, well, there’s only one reasonable choice.

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    The Summer of AAPL is here.  Enjoy it (responsibly) while it lasts.
    AFB Night Owl Teamâ„¢
    Thanks, Steve.

         
  • Posted: 18 May 2011 03:24 AM #98

    Google is trying to create a “garden of Eden” where we can play and never worry. For Google we already give up privacy, and with Chromebook, we’d be giving up our remaining control too. A beguiling but terrifying world. If you’re not paying, you’re obviously not the customer - so what are you?  Apple today feels a more trustworthy partner in a moderately wicked world.

    To catch wild horses in the open plains you first put out food, then gradually introduce fencing around it. After a few weeks,  you can spring up and shut the gate on them. Apple (with Google’s help) first made sure that there were open plains, with a standardized open Internet that anyone can use, where anyone can setup in business. Only then did they create the “closed” IOS ecosystem. It’s knowing that we can leave that lets us trust Apple.

         
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    Posted: 18 May 2011 03:41 PM #99

    Another great chart by Horace. It’s interesting that even though Google is supposedly “winning” the smartphone wars, they show neither profits or phone sales.


    http://www.asymco.com/2011/05/18/the-rawr-chart/

         
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    Posted: 18 May 2011 04:07 PM #100

    Talk about a tail.

         
  • Posted: 18 May 2011 04:12 PM #101

    Tetrachloride - 18 May 2011 07:07 PM

    Talk about a tail.

    Yeah and the big dog’s wagging it.

         
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    Posted: 18 May 2011 04:14 PM #102

    From one of Horace’s readers (@JustinD).

         
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    Posted: 19 May 2011 02:07 PM #103

    Its interesting to see the disintegration (multiple meanings) of these companies. 

    Microsoft   (phones, Windows, Skype)
    Acer
    RIM
    Nokia
    Google—Android, Buzz
    HP

    Are any of the large tech companies who are marketing to consumers have any appeal, beside Facebook ?

         
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    Posted: 19 May 2011 02:24 PM #104

    adamthompson3232 - 19 May 2011 01:54 PM

    Interesting comments from Intel’s CEO re: Android and iOs.

    http://www.appleinsider.com/articles/11/05/19/intel_ceo_google_android_experiencing_chaotic_growing_pains.html


    One interesting aspect is that Apple’s model has not changed in terms of maintaining their ecosystem from day one.

    Apple has always had a tight hold over their hardware and OS since the first Mac. While the industry was moving to Windows running on any and every hardware, the terms used were scalability, choice, low cost, etc… Apple remained steadfast with their higher price points for Mac’s and keeping their OS closed and proprietary to their own hardware, at least under Jobs’ watch.

    In the last decade this model has paid off handsomely. And the industry has done a turnaround now using fragmented and difficult to use for anything not Apple. It would be hard pressed for companies to compete with a model that consumers seemingly evolved into.

         
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    Posted: 19 May 2011 02:32 PM #105

    More on the AppTel relationship:

    Intel Aggressively Dropping Power Consumption in Future Notebook Processors

    Intel’s future roadmap for notebook processors will now target a much lower power draw then present chips. That means ultra-low voltage processors like those found in the MacBook Air will become the norm instead of a specialty product.

    Intel seems to be clearly feeling the pressure of the growing smartphone and tablet market, According to the Financial Times, Otellini describes a future of PCs evolving into “higher performance mainstream-priced, touch-enabled device that would not compromise on features such as thinness, instant-on capabilities, permanent internet connectivity and all-day battery life.” Apple’s notebook line will certainly benefit from these advances.

    Intel and Apple have had a close relationship since Apple switched over to Intel’s processors several years ago. Apple has frequently been the first computer manufacturer to ship the latest Intel technologies. In a Reuters report yesterday, Intel said they work very closely with Apple and that Apple even influences their roadmap:

    “We work very closely with them and we’re constantly looking down the road at what we can be doing relative to future products. I’d go as far as to say Apple helps shape our roadmap,” Kilroy said.

    http://www.macrumors.com/2011/05/19/intel-lowering-power-consumption-of-future-notebook-processors/