The End of the White MacBook?

  • Posted: 26 April 2011 09:34 PM #16

    Tetrachloride - 27 April 2011 12:28 AM

    The strength of a cast aluminum laptop gives considerable piece of mind.

    Also, for laptops, I recommend Applecare.


    Never leave a laptop without it.

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    Posted: 26 April 2011 10:57 PM #17

    wab95 - 27 April 2011 12:16 AM

    I’ll probably spec his out to 4GB RAM and a 500 GB hard drive.

    Many thanks for the feedback, geoduck.

    You are very welcome.
    FWIW I added the memory and replaced the drive myself, saving a bunch of cash. However that’s kinda what I do for a living so…

    [ Edited: 26 April 2011 10:59 PM by geoduck ]

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  • Posted: 26 April 2011 10:58 PM #18

    DawnTreader - 26 April 2011 05:40 AM

    Are we nearing the end of the white MacBook? Could this be the last education buying season in which it’s available?

    Is there a need for it any longer in the product line with the drop in price on the MacBook Air and the positioning of the Apple iPad as a K-12 product solution?

    What do you think?

    I bought a Mac Book Air as a Christmas gift and gave it to my ex-wife (her iMac had died and she was looking to replace it with a portable).

    Having played with it some, I find it to be a much better solution than my daughter’s MacBook.  It’s faster, starts instantly and feels lighter.  The weight issue is probably the lack of a traditional hard drive and optical drive.  For everything both do, the MacBook Air’s storage capacity is more than enough.

    After playing with it I felt the MacBook was doomed, although sales of it may extend its life until the consumer feels more comfortable with its non-traditional technology.

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  • Posted: 26 April 2011 11:26 PM #19

    redge - 27 April 2011 02:08 AM
    Gregg Thurman - 27 April 2011 01:58 AM

    Having played with it [MacBook Air] some, I find it to be a much better solution than my daughter’s MacBook.  It’s faster, starts instantly and feels lighter.

    The 13” MacBook Air feels lighter than the 13” MacBook because it weighs 2.3 lbs instead of 4.7 lbs, for a difference in weight of just over 100%.

    Thanks.  I didn’t have actual weights handy, and didn’t want to make an exaggerated statement regarding the differences.  :  )

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  • Posted: 26 April 2011 11:28 PM #20

    redge - 27 April 2011 01:51 AM

    The retail price on those specs for the MacBook (don’t know about student pricing) is $1200. For the same price, you can buy a 4GB RAM MacBook Pro with 320GB of storage that includes a Thunderbolt port. At that point, you are also within $100 of a 13” MacBook Air, which is significantly lighter and has a demonstrably superior screen to both the MacBook and MacBook Pro. Just maybe some things to think about.

    Re Apple Care, I personally won’t buy it at time of purchase. One has a year to purchase it. My personal experience is that if an electronic device is going to fail in a big way, it will happen much sooner than that. For me, it is something to let ride and to make a decision about just before 365 days from my purchase.

    Cheers


    You are correct about the pricing. For the student pricing, the difference would be $15 were I to have these factory done, but like geoduck, I will do this myself. However, your comment has made me rethink the price/performance differential.

    As for the Apple Care, your strategy is fine if you are somewhere accessible to an Apple Care purchase, which frequently I am not. Buying most of my machines on grants, it’s a no-brained to go ahead and get the extra coverage. I have had to use it more often than I would imagined, and always when I have been in deep field. It has saved me a bundle over the years.

    Many thanks for the input.

    [ Edited: 26 April 2011 11:31 PM by wab95 ]

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    Posted: 26 April 2011 11:49 PM #21

    Gregg Thurman - 27 April 2011 01:58 AM
    DawnTreader - 26 April 2011 05:40 AM

    Are we nearing the end of the white MacBook? Could this be the last education buying season in which it’s available?

    Is there a need for it any longer in the product line with the drop in price on the MacBook Air and the positioning of the Apple iPad as a K-12 product solution?

    What do you think?

    I bought a Mac Book Air as a Christmas gift and gave it to my ex-wife (her iMac had died and she was looking to replace it with a portable).

    Having played with it some, I find it to be a much better solution than my daughter’s MacBook.  It’s faster, starts instantly and feels lighter.  The weight issue is probably the lack of a traditional hard drive and optical drive.  For everything both do, the MacBook Air’s storage capacity is more than enough.

    After playing with it I felt the MacBook was doomed, although sales of it may extend its life until the consumer feels more comfortable with its non-traditional technology.

    5 reasons why apple wants the HDD & Optical drive to dissapear:

    - The HDD & optical drive are 2 of the most prone parts of a laptop to failure - removing these 2 components will lower apples Mac warranty cost a good deal.
    - People are more likely to buy movies & software through apples itunes & app stores instead of physical media.
    - Removing the components leaves more room to either reduce the thickness of the computer or add more space for a bigger battery, thereby improving the product.
    - Removing the components increases the battery life of the macbook, thereby improving the product.
    - Removing the components means less components! (obviously.) therefore there are less components from other manufactures prone to failure, less disruption to apples product lines if those component suppliers have supply chain interruption. Less components to incorporate in principle makes the manufacturing process faster & cheaper.

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    Posted: 27 April 2011 01:05 AM #22

    redge - 27 April 2011 03:08 AM
    Gregg Thurman - 27 April 2011 02:26 AM

    I didn’t have actual weights handy, and didn’t want to make an exaggerated statement regarding the differences.  :  )

    Sorry, I was looking at the 11” weight. The 13” is 2.9 lbs vs 4.7 lbs. Still much, much lighter.

    If the processing power is adequate to one’s needs, and one can afford the premium (which to my mind means buying the 4GB RAM version), the 13” Air is a no-brainer. Unfortunately (although some do-it-yourselfers claim otherwise), it is necessary with the Airs to choose between 2GB and 4GB at time of purchase.

    As a comment on the latest post, I don’t think that this is about what Apple wants to make disappear. The Airs are a genuine response to what some consumers want, myself among them. In particular, this statement about the Airs is wrong: “Removing the components increases the battery life of the macbook, thereby improving the product.” In fact, the battery life of the Airs is two hours less (five hours vs. seven hours) than the 13” Macbook and Macbook Pro.

    I did not know that RE: the battery life - but i think the point is still correct - if everything else remains the same, a macbook with its optical drive & HDD removed will have better battery life than if it still had them included.

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    Posted: 27 April 2011 01:30 AM #23

    What would Tim Cook do ?

    Reduce the supply line of an oddball product.    The white MacBook is not in keeping with the armored image of Apple’s Mac lines.  Second, reduction of parts to order is a good thing. 

    To conclude:  Dell,  Acer and those others can have the plastic.

         
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    Posted: 27 April 2011 01:38 AM #24

    I’m not sure Ive and Co. would’ve gone through the trouble of a polycarbonate case redesign for the Macbook if it only had more year of existence.  To my knowledge that’s never happened in the history of Mac.  Granted, it’s more common with iPod, iPad (very limited number of data points, there), and iPhone (though I think it’s more likely to be on a two-year external design cycle).

    MacBook may be kinda like the iPod classic of Macs, but that classic’s still around…

    [ Edited: 27 April 2011 01:41 AM by Mav ]

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  • Posted: 27 April 2011 01:40 AM #25

    Jony may no longer delight us with his pronunciation of Aluminum if 2012 MacBook Pros bring us carbon fiber cases.  Read here for the BGR link that tantalizes future MacBook Pros in carbon fiber black.

         
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    Posted: 27 April 2011 01:42 AM #26

    Carbon fiber is more vulnerable to compression/shock, though, IIRC (brittle). 

    Maybe Liquidmetal alloys?

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    Posted: 27 April 2011 02:24 AM #27

    Mav - 27 April 2011 04:38 AM

    I’m not sure Ive and Co. would’ve gone through the trouble of a polycarbonate case redesign for the Macbook if it only had more year of existence.  To my knowledge that’s never happened in the history of Mac.  Granted, it’s more common with iPod, iPad (very limited number of data points, there), and iPhone (though I think it’s more likely to be on a two-year external design cycle).

    MacBook may be kinda like the iPod classic of Macs, but that classic’s still around…

    Possibly they didnt intend to change it, but the redesign was cheaper than the ongoing warranty costs on the old cracking cases. non-mac products have annual redesigns (ipod nano in particular has an extreme redesign every year it seems).

    thinking about it, I think the macbook will dissapear once the $999 macbook air comes with 128gig SSD standard (hopefully this year).

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    Posted: 27 April 2011 07:14 PM #28

    redge - 27 April 2011 02:15 PM
    iOSWeekly - 27 April 2011 05:24 AM

    thinking about it, I think the macbook will dissapear once the $999 macbook air comes with 128gig SSD standard (hopefully this year).

    I have the 11” Air with 1.6GHz processor, 4GB RAM and 128GB SSD. It costs $1400 ($1480 with an external CD/DVD drive). I think that it is a niche computer that would not meet the needs of a lot of the people who purchase the white MacBooks. Maybe if Apple started selling the 13” Air for $999, but I just don’t see that happening anytime soon. Apple markets these products at a premium over the MacBooks, especially noticeable when one starts adding what I would consider more or less necessary options, and I don’t see why Apple would do an about face on this strategy.

    Thanks for relaying your experience.

    I’m interested in your thoughts on the RAM situation - Why do you think that people need 4GB? do you think the 2GB base amount is not adequate for an entry level computer where the user is primarily using it for email & Web? The $999 white macbook also comes with only 2GB - I would have thought the macbook air with its SSD would actually be better with 2GB or ram compared to the white macbook with the same 2GB?

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    Posted: 27 April 2011 09:57 PM #29

    There’s a strong difference between my 2.4 Ghz iMac C2D and my 2.8 Ghz C2D.    The first has 2GB of RAM and the second has 4 GB.

    It would be hard for me in good conscience to recommend a new Mac with only 2 GB of RAM.  It would depend on the customers’ needs.

         
  • Posted: 28 April 2011 04:04 AM #30

    redge - 28 April 2011 02:49 AM

    Given my needs, the 11” Air made a great deal of sense and I am very happy with it. That said, when I bought it a friend commented wryly that I had just bought a very expensive netbook. There is a certain amount of truth in that. The 11”, as distinct from the 13”, is not, in my view, a general purpose computer.

    For your friend it would be an expensive netbook. For you it’s an enhancement to your personal productivity solutions.

    Because netbooks are underpowered and overpriced sales are taking a critical hit. They were a stopgap but will quickly become irrelevant. The integration of the Mac and iOS-based devices will reach new heights following the release of Lion.