Why Time Machine Is A Mac Essential

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    Posted: 24 May 2011 02:26 AM #16

    I am using “Time Machine Editor” as a override on Time Machine.

    Generally speaking my iMac is on all day but the new material comes in late as I download the day’s images.
    Using TME I back-up once every 4 hours but after downloading images perform a “back-up now” so I can reformat my SDHC card.

    Early this year a Software Update went wrong and Snow Leopard ground to a halt.  I decided to do a nuke-&-pave.  The system asked me if I had a good back-up and I told it which one.(the last one before the software update).  I was basically told to bugger off for a few hours (which I did) and when I came back we were up and running, right to all the system and application preferences.  It was like nothing had happened at all!

    Once a week I make an external back-up on a separate disk and place this off-site in case of fire/robbery etc.

    Time Machine is worth its weight in gold.

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    Cheers:
    Bob

         
  • Posted: 24 May 2011 01:24 PM #17

    WetcoastBob - 24 May 2011 05:26 AM

    I am using “Time Machine Editor” as a override on Time Machine.

    Generally speaking my iMac is on all day but the new material comes in late as I download the day’s images.
    Using TME I back-up once every 4 hours but after downloading images perform a “back-up now” so I can reformat my SDHC card.

    Early this year a Software Update went wrong and Snow Leopard ground to a halt.  I decided to do a nuke-&-pave.  The system asked me if I had a good back-up and I told it which one.(the last one before the software update).  I was basically told to bugger off for a few hours (which I did) and when I came back we were up and running, right to all the system and application preferences.  It was like nothing had happened at all!

    Once a week I make an external back-up on a separate disk and place this off-site in case of fire/robbery etc.

    Time Machine is worth its weight in gold.

    Excellent post.  grin

    It describes the benefits of Time Machine in an informative way.

         
  • Posted: 24 May 2011 02:31 PM #18

    ChasMac77 - 24 May 2011 01:18 AM
    kloot - 23 May 2011 05:34 PM

    curious - what drives do peeps like for using w/ Time Machine?

    I use an external FireWire drive. USB is just too slow. TM can choke while searching for files. You can’t believe how much I use it for version control as a web designer. Best part of OSX.x in my opinion.

    I look at drobo’s every now and again and they’re usb as I recall.  Most of the reviews comment on how dog slow they are for the initial back up but that it doesn’t really impact them or matter once it’s done.  Alex Lindsey from The Pixel Corp said much the same thing when commenting on his.  If you just need a single simple drive I see a refurbed Western Digital 1TB is on sale for $56.99 today.  Tough to beat and you’ll find it here.  No affiliation etc. etc.

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    I don’t mind being wrong…,I just hate being wrong so FAST!

         
  • Posted: 25 May 2011 12:10 AM #19

    BillH - 24 May 2011 05:31 PM
    ChasMac77 - 24 May 2011 01:18 AM
    kloot - 23 May 2011 05:34 PM

    curious - what drives do peeps like for using w/ Time Machine?

    I use an external FireWire drive. USB is just too slow. TM can choke while searching for files. You can’t believe how much I use it for version control as a web designer. Best part of OSX.x in my opinion.

    I look at drobo’s every now and again and they’re usb as I recall.  Most of the reviews comment on how dog slow they are for the initial back up but that it doesn’t really impact them or matter once it’s done.  Alex Lindsey from The Pixel Corp said much the same thing when commenting on his.  If you just need a single simple drive I see a refurbed Western Digital 1TB is on sale for $56.99 today.  Tough to beat and you’ll find it here.  No affiliation etc. etc.

    I agree. A good Western Digital drive should more than do the trick. I do, however, enjoy the Apple Time Capsule for wireless backup of multiple Macs.

         
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    Posted: 25 May 2011 11:02 AM #20

    BillH - 24 May 2011 05:31 PM
    ChasMac77 - 24 May 2011 01:18 AM
    kloot - 23 May 2011 05:34 PM

    curious - what drives do peeps like for using w/ Time Machine?

    I use an external FireWire drive. USB is just too slow. TM can choke while searching for files. You can’t believe how much I use it for version control as a web designer. Best part of OSX.x in my opinion.

    I look at drobo’s every now and again and they’re usb as I recall.  Most of the reviews comment on how dog slow they are for the initial back up but that it doesn’t really impact them or matter once it’s done.  Alex Lindsey from The Pixel Corp said much the same thing when commenting on his.  If you just need a single simple drive I see a refurbed Western Digital 1TB is on sale for $56.99 today.  Tough to beat and you’ll find it here.  No affiliation etc. etc.

    My experience is that there is a huge difference between USB and FW drives. It may be that this has improved over time but for work, I don’t really care about the extra cost of FW. BTW, have a drive that is 4X the size of the HD it’s backing up.

         
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    Posted: 25 May 2011 12:06 PM #21

    redge - 25 May 2011 02:42 PM

    Nothing wrong with Time Machine, but I don’t use it. I just transfer a file that I’m working on to external local storage and/or sftp it to my remote storage.

    Really undoable in a rapidly changing work environment (at least mine). I would waste half my day moving files back and forth. Why not let TM do it seamlessly?

         
  • Posted: 25 May 2011 12:50 PM #22

    ChasMac77 - 25 May 2011 03:06 PM

    Why not let TM do it seamlessly?


    Why not, indeed.

    Another functional benefit of TM is that I can put all the home computers on Time Machine, ensuring that my wife and kids’ machines all are backed up (excluding mine, that’s another four). There is no way I could get any of them to comply otherwise, and at least two of these computers has had to retrieve data from a versioned backup in the past year. All we need to do is know when the document or file was last saved, go back to that time period and bring it back. Better than magic.

    On that note, TM has the added advantage of removing that time-honoured excuse, ‘I was nearly done, and then the computer deleted my homework’. I recently told one of kids, ‘No worries! Let’s bring back your last saved version’. A real spoiler, TM is.

    For those who are disciplined enough to manually save their data, well and good, but they still will not likely have multiple versions available at least for a period. And although I would like to think that I am disciplined (compulsive even when it comes to data protection), I am also busy and appreciate being able to concentrate on other things (like work) rather than backing up data.

    However, having additional backup software, like Intego Personal Backup to create versioned backups of key files throughout the work day, and Carbon Copy Cloner to create a bootable copy of one’s hard drive, are all important adjuncts.

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  • Posted: 25 May 2011 03:31 PM #23

    Time Machine is a nearly perfect passive backup solution and runs automatically each hour. For people who do not regularly backup their data it is the best and least expensive (free) backup solution.

    The vasty majority of computer users have no backup solution in place. There are no reasonable excuses for the lack of a backup regimen.

         
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    Posted: 25 May 2011 04:14 PM #24

    Agreed for your startup disc I think it’s great.  I just had occasion to use it twice this week.

    First at home I wanted to reformat the iMac’s drive to zeros and restore everything.  It worked great once I found out that you need to use your SL disc to restore a SL backup. 

    Then at work to restore a deleted mailbox, and to restore a folder of documentation that had been wiped out by a newer installer. 

    But I don’t use it to backup working media as I don’t want it interfering with a recording in progress and I can backup to an additional internal drive at the end of the day.  I stopped using FW drives in favour of internal SATA bays, they seem alot faster than even FW800.

    For archival backups I got a drive enclosure (FW800) that allows you to hot-swap raw ATA drives.  So I can keep a tray of (usually) 500GB drives on the shelf for each project without having to shell out the money for enclosures with interfaces which may or may not be work in a few years.  The raw drives are really inexpensive and don’t take up as much physical storage space.

    i looked at Drobo, but I’m a little concerned about the proprietary format.

    I don’t have TM set to automatic, I manually run it.

    ymmv

         
  • Posted: 27 May 2011 11:35 AM #25

    jimlongo - 25 May 2011 07:14 PM

    Agreed for your startup disc I think it’s great.  I just had occasion to use it twice this week.

    First at home I wanted to reformat the iMac’s drive to zeros and restore everything.  It worked great once I found out that you need to use your SL disc to restore a SL backup. 

    Then at work to restore a deleted mailbox, and to restore a folder of documentation that had been wiped out by a newer installer. 

    But I don’t use it to backup working media as I don’t want it interfering with a recording in progress and I can backup to an additional internal drive at the end of the day.  I stopped using FW drives in favour of internal SATA bays, they seem alot faster than even FW800.

    As a passive backup solution for 99% of Mac owners Time Machine is nearly perfect. For pros working with large media files I can see the hourly routine being a burden and a process that would chew up storage space quite quickly.