The Future of RIMM

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    Posted: 29 May 2012 01:39 PM #181

    I’m going to post Horace’s latest in the RIMM thread, but it works for Nokia, LG and others…..the descent to death….

    http://www.asymco.com/2012/05/29/post-traumatic-life-expectancy-of-phone-vendors/

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  • Posted: 29 May 2012 05:26 PM #183

    Single digits tomorrow for the stock.

         
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    Posted: 29 May 2012 05:37 PM #184

    adamthompson32 - 29 May 2012 08:26 PM

    Single digits tomorrow for the stock.

    Already down there in AH.

         
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    Posted: 29 May 2012 05:45 PM #185

    What enterprise user of Blackberry would not now seek options….quickly

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  • Posted: 29 May 2012 05:58 PM #186

    Wordy, over wordsmithed piece of corporate baloney by off-the-shelf PR bullshit artists.  Painful to read.

    Yes, RIMM, you were spot on .... amateur hour is indeed over.

         
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    Posted: 29 May 2012 06:52 PM #187

    ?The on-going competitive environment is impacting our business in the form of lower volumes and highly competitive pricing dynamics in the marketplace, and we expect our Q1 results to reflect this, and likely result in an operating loss for the quarter,? CEO Thorsten Heins said in a statement issued after trading of the shares were halted for the news.

    Heins didn?t quantify the expected loss. Analysts had been forecasting a 42-cent per-share profit on a non-GAAP basis and operating profit of $264 million. This looks like a pretty serious turn for the worse…

    http://allthingsd.com/20120529/rim-expects-operating-loss-as-bankers-help-company-explore-option-two-new-senior-execs/

         
  • Posted: 29 May 2012 07:25 PM #188

    Drew Bear - 29 May 2012 09:52 PM

    ?The on-going competitive environment is impacting our business in the form of lower volumes and highly competitive pricing dynamics in the marketplace, and we expect our Q1 results to reflect this, and likely result in an operating loss for the quarter,? CEO Thorsten Heins said in a statement issued after trading of the shares were halted for the news.

    Heins didn?t quantify the expected loss. Analysts had been forecasting a 42-cent per-share profit on a non-GAAP basis and operating profit of $264 million. This looks like a pretty serious turn for the worse…

    http://allthingsd.com/20120529/rim-expects-operating-loss-as-bankers-help-company-explore-option-two-new-senior-execs/

    This strikes me as the gist of the news. Maybe my memory is faulty, but my recollection is that hiring the bankers was already done, or at least known to be in the works.

    These are expensive phones accompanied by expensive data plans. Who are customers moving to?

    Can Apple offer comparable security yet? If not ...?

         
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    Posted: 29 May 2012 07:32 PM #189

    Stew - 29 May 2012 10:25 PM
    Drew Bear - 29 May 2012 09:52 PM

    ?The on-going competitive environment is impacting our business in the form of lower volumes and highly competitive pricing dynamics in the marketplace, and we expect our Q1 results to reflect this, and likely result in an operating loss for the quarter,? CEO Thorsten Heins said in a statement issued after trading of the shares were halted for the news.

    Heins didn?t quantify the expected loss. Analysts had been forecasting a 42-cent per-share profit on a non-GAAP basis and operating profit of $264 million. This looks like a pretty serious turn for the worse…

    http://allthingsd.com/20120529/rim-expects-operating-loss-as-bankers-help-company-explore-option-two-new-senior-execs/

    This strikes me as the gist of the news. Maybe my memory is faulty, but my recollection is that hiring the bankers was already done, or at least known to be in the works.

    These are expensive phones accompanied by expensive data plans. Who are customers moving to?

    Can Apple offer comparable security yet? If not ...?

    The speed of the cascade in market share loss, coupled with the tacit admission that nothing in Blackberry 10 (maybe out late this year) is going to stem the avalanche…....its deathly frightening. Just HOW bad is it going to be? Pretty darn bad!

     

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  • Posted: 29 May 2012 07:53 PM #190

    Red Shirted Ensign - 29 May 2012 10:32 PM
    Stew - 29 May 2012 10:25 PM
    Drew Bear - 29 May 2012 09:52 PM

    ?The on-going competitive environment is impacting our business in the form of lower volumes and highly competitive pricing dynamics in the marketplace, and we expect our Q1 results to reflect this, and likely result in an operating loss for the quarter,? CEO Thorsten Heins said in a statement issued after trading of the shares were halted for the news.

    Heins didn?t quantify the expected loss. Analysts had been forecasting a 42-cent per-share profit on a non-GAAP basis and operating profit of $264 million. This looks like a pretty serious turn for the worse…

    http://allthingsd.com/20120529/rim-expects-operating-loss-as-bankers-help-company-explore-option-two-new-senior-execs/

    This strikes me as the gist of the news. Maybe my memory is faulty, but my recollection is that hiring the bankers was already done, or at least known to be in the works.

    These are expensive phones accompanied by expensive data plans. Who are customers moving to?

    Can Apple offer comparable security yet? If not ...?

    The speed of the cascade in market share loss, coupled with the tacit admission that nothing in Blackberry 10 (maybe out late this year) is going to stem the avalanche…....its deathly frightening. Just HOW bad is it going to be? Pretty darn bad!

     

    Maybe, but are there things about RIM’s operating system - e.g. security - that Apple might be interested in? In other words, what, if anything, does RIM offer at this point that Apple has been unable to, or can’t for patent reasons, duplicate?

    The other question, if RIM sales are deteriorating more quickly than expected (in other words, that this is not a matter of discounting to hold business), is where are customers going?

    And if RIM is losing customers, does this mean that enterprises/governments are leaving, or is it part of the movement to let employees buy/supply their smartphone of choice?

    [ Edited: 29 May 2012 08:00 PM by Stew ]      
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    Posted: 29 May 2012 08:24 PM #191

    Stew what part of security are you referring to?  If its [/url] FIPS 140-2, then Apple has crypto modules under review for both iPhone and IPad, which at least for the government is a major hurdle in the security requirements area.

         
  • Posted: 29 May 2012 08:49 PM #192

    pats - 29 May 2012 11:24 PM

    Stew what part of security are you referring to?  If its [/url] FIPS 140-2, then Apple has crypto modules under review for both iPhone and IPad, which at least for the government is a major hurdle in the security requirements area.

    Hi, as you know one of the main selling points of a Blackberry for some purposes is the inability of third parties to intercept and/or decipher Blackberry messages. I’m no expert, but as I understand it, this is partly a matter of encryption and partly a matter of routing traffic through RIM’s own servers. As I’m sure you also know, RIM’s system is sufficiently good at this that certain countries over the last few years have engaged in negotiations with RIM about getting access to Blackberry messages.

    Until two years ago, I worked for an organization - a big organization - for which this security was extremely important. At the time, Apple phones were a non-starter in part because they could not offer the same.

    Fast forward a couple of years. Can Apple now offer this? If not, is there an argument for Apple buying RIM’s system?

         
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    Posted: 29 May 2012 09:31 PM #193

    I spent some time working computer security issues for some DOD systems, and while the blackberry system has a clear advantage each system goes thru a certification process so even if you could pull the security guts out of the blackberry and implement in the iOS system.  Apple would be at square one in the certification and accreditation process.  Blackberry has an advantage as it is an approved system.  Apple has gained FIPS 140-1 approval for OS X and from what I’ve read the security architecture of iOS is on par with Blackberry OS, but some of the anncillary functions like device management are not as robust and Apple devices rely on 3rd party software like Good which makes implementation more complex.

         
  • Posted: 29 May 2012 10:40 PM #194

    pats - 30 May 2012 12:31 AM

    I spent some time working computer security issues for some DOD systems, and while the blackberry system has a clear advantage each system goes thru a certification process so even if you could pull the security guts out of the blackberry and implement in the iOS system.  Apple would be at square one in the certification and accreditation process.  Blackberry has an advantage as it is an approved system.  Apple has gained FIPS 140-1 approval for OS X and from what I’ve read the security architecture of iOS is on par with Blackberry OS, but some of the anncillary functions like device management are not as robust and Apple devices rely on 3rd party software like Good which makes implementation more complex.

    This sounds like there continue to be reasons why Blackberry is more secure than iPhone. If that is true, it is not just a matter of defense departments. It is a major issue for governments, across the board, and for corporations that care about security.

    Which raises the question of whether Apple might be interested in a partnership with, or purchase of, RIM.

    This is not a minor issue. As I understand it, as of a couple of years ago, the principal advantage of the Blackberry was that it offered a degree of security that the iPhone did not. If that hasn’t changed, RIM has a core clientele that won’t leave until some other company can offer something comparable in terms of security.

         
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    Posted: 30 May 2012 12:18 AM #195

    There are certainly industries where if you don’t meet the requirements security being one critical one.  Most of the issues are in regulated industiies with well defined requirements, but the certification and accreditation process is required before the device can be use on the network.  In the DOD we had some unique requirements like CAC cards.  To log into your computer you need to insert your ID card in addition to your password but I think in general it is less an issue of one device has better security.  RIM has been serving the government needs and so they have been through the process which can take several years.  You could probably accelerate the process with some of RIMs knowledge, but RIM is not that far ahead as far as security technology that it would make sense to buy the company.  With all the patent litigation, the RIM patents certainly have some value.