Is the public finally growing tired of Android?

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    Posted: 23 May 2012 10:03 PM #46

    From the article:

    “It?s actually easier to make tremendous progress sometimes the more ambitious you are,? Larry Page told Motorola employees in a town hall meeting last August. ?If you?re trying to do something kind of incremental, like a little bit similar to what you did before, it?s actually hard to get people excited about it.?

    That sounds like it could be a commentary on a certain company I know.  It better not be for Page’s sake, because it would represent a fundamental misunderstanding.

    Better yet:

    Woodside, 43, is an Iron Man triathlete with a law degree from Stanford and little experience at building hardware or software. He admits to catching up only recently on such underlying technologies as mobile-phone processors. He started his career clerking for a federal judge in New York, helping decide cases that stemmed from the terrorist bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 and the first attack on the World Trade Center. After a five-year stint as a management consultant at McKinsey, he joined Google as a director of business operations in 2003. His new employer sent him overseas to open offices in Russia, Turkey, and the Middle East. In 2009, Woodside returned home to take over the U.S. sales operation, whose revenue rose from $10.8 billion to $17.5 billion on his watch. ?He?s had Google?s ad business running as smoothly and tightly as I?ve ever seen that kind of media business run,? says Penry Price, a former Google colleague who is now at M6D, a marketing company in New York.

    That’s fine that Tim Cook tried to recruit him.  But…Motorola’s CEO is a…is a…

    [ Edited: 23 May 2012 11:27 PM by Mav ]

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    Posted: 23 May 2012 11:30 PM #47

    Mav - 24 May 2012 01:00 AM

    Samsung can’t like that quote.  rolleyes

    I think Samsung knew full well where this was going. The question is do they have the guts to take what they can from Android and completely go their own way. They could do it today and partner with Amazon for content, but they still rely on Google for maps and cloud services. It’s more likely they’ll ride Google for another iteration or two of Android before attempting a split.

    Google does not have much time to make Motorola competitive. I’m looking forward to their first phone and tablet. They certainly have the talent and the money to push this. I suspect they’ll soon find out that it is not as easy as Apple makes it look.

         
  • Posted: 23 May 2012 11:55 PM #48

    Drew Bear - 24 May 2012 02:30 AM
    Mav - 24 May 2012 01:00 AM

    Samsung can’t like that quote.  rolleyes

    I think Samsung knew full well where this was going. The question is do they have the guts to take what they can from Android and completely go their own way. They could do it today and partner with Amazon for content, but they still rely on Google for maps and cloud services. It’s more likely they’ll ride Google for another iteration or two of Android before attempting a split.

    Google does not have much time to make Motorola competitive. I’m looking forward to their first phone and tablet. They certainly have the talent and the money to push this. I suspect they’ll soon find out that it is not as easy as Apple makes it look.

    They already know it isn’t easy. They just spent $12.5 billion proving they know that. But even $12.5 billion won’t make it all that much easier. Google, after all these years, is still clamoring to find another real revenue source and, so far, no dice.

         
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    Posted: 23 May 2012 11:57 PM #49

    Still waiting on someone to put together that puzzle piece about Moto’s new CEO there.  Woodside will eventually wish he’d been in Apple Sales.

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    Posted: 24 May 2012 01:46 AM #50

    adamthompson32 - 24 May 2012 02:55 AM
    Drew Bear - 24 May 2012 02:30 AM

    Google does not have much time to make Motorola competitive. I’m looking forward to their first phone and tablet. They certainly have the talent and the money to push this. I suspect they’ll soon find out that it is not as easy as Apple makes it look.

    They already know it isn’t easy. They just spent $12.5 billion proving they know that. But even $12.5 billion won’t make it all that much easier. Google, after all these years, is still clamoring to find another real revenue source and, so far, no dice.

    I think Google are arrogant and thought Motorola execs failed to utilize their engineering talent and IP arsenal to create a true competitor to Apple’s products. They believe their own management team will be able to change all that. We’ll see.

    You can’t really blame them for aiming high. They’re a very profitable company, but what Apple rakes in makes them look like minor leaguers. They think they can play in the big leagues and deserve the same kind of profits Apple earns. Again, we’ll see.

    Motorola hardware is not bad. If they drop all the cheap junk and focus on a handful of phones and tablets, they could make headway in a few years.

    Add consistent software integration and timely updates and I could see them increasing brand loyalty. Of course they’ll have to greatly improve customer service and all the other “minor” details that make consumers love Apple.

    This will take time, but I think the Google trio understand that. Let’s see if they can execute. I don’t doubt they can do better than old-Motorola. Their first target is to catch up with Samsung & HTC. The clock is ticking on this first phase.

         
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    Posted: 24 May 2012 02:01 AM #51

    Step One:  Get rid of Motoblur.  Moto will now be the Pure Google Android vendor.

    Step Two:  Bring all hardware partners down to second-tier by releasing Moto software updates first.

    Step Three:  Radically simplify Moto lineup to 3-6 models so you can actually release Moto software updates on a timely basis.

    Step Four:  Obsess over each model (read: slow product cadence and hyper-intensify product focus).  Hmm, exactly what does Google have to bring the table on that one…?

    Step Five:  Actually pose a serious competitive threat to Samsung.  Which again makes things complicated (see Step Two)...

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    Posted: 24 May 2012 02:17 AM #52

    Mav - 24 May 2012 02:57 AM

    Still waiting on someone to put together that puzzle piece about Moto’s new CEO there.  Woodside will eventually wish he’d been in Apple Sales.

    Delete the fluff and you get this:

    Woodside…with… little experience at building hardware or software. He admits to catching up only recently on such underlying technologies as mobile-phone processors…he joined Google as a director of business operations in 2003…In 2009, Woodside returned home to take over the U.S. sales operation, whose revenue rose from $10.8 billion to $17.5 billion on his watch.

    Of course the bulk of that revenue increase had nothing to do with mobile or Android.

    Woodside took the easier route. He knows Google is committed to throwing tons of money at this project, so he’s almost certain to succeed in turning Moto from a money-loser to some semblance of profitability. And they’ll give him 2-3 years to do this.

    If he’d gone to Apple, he would have been expected to at least continue an unprecedented growth streak. Some might have expected more. And they’d expect immediate results with no room for any stumbles.

         
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    Posted: 24 May 2012 03:14 AM #53

    Well, Apple products DO sell themselves.  And at least he’d be a sales guy in a sales position, if you know what I mean.

    He’s not in an impossible situation.  But he’s already confessed to having a number of disadvantages from the word go.

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    Posted: 24 May 2012 12:57 PM #54

    http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2012/05/24/google-didnt-infringe-on-oracle-patents-jury-rules/

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    Posted: 24 May 2012 01:36 PM #55

    Mav - 24 May 2012 05:01 AM

    Step One:  Get rid of Motoblur.  Moto will now be the Pure Google Android vendor.

    Step Two:  Bring all hardware partners down to second-tier by releasing Moto software updates first.

    Step Three:  Radically simplify Moto lineup to 3-6 models so you can actually release Moto software updates on a timely basis.

    Step Four:  Obsess over each model (read: slow product cadence and hyper-intensify product focus).  Hmm, exactly what does Google have to bring the table on that one…?

    Step Five:  Actually pose a serious competitive threat to Samsung.  Which again makes things complicated (see Step Two)...

    I don’t think they will be allowed to execute #2; at least not in the short-term. As you say, that makes #5 problematic. Step #1 and #3 should be implemented immediately. They will attempt #4, but it’s not really part of their corporate culture.

    I’m excited to see what Googorola come up with. I don’t think Apple is complacent, but this will certainly give them just that extra bit of incentive. It’ll also light a fire under Samsung & HTC, so it’ll be fun to watch how that plays out.

         
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    Posted: 07 June 2012 12:37 PM #56

    Nearly 1 of 4 iPhone buyers are upgrading from an Android phone.

    Now 38% of iPhone sales are to refugees from Android or RIM

    Here’s more evidence that Google’s (GOOG) Android is peaking…

    http://tech.fortune.cnn.com/2012/06/07/now-38-of-iphone-sales-are-to-refugees-from-android-or-rim/

    Edited to include link.

    [ Edited: 07 June 2012 01:26 PM by Drew Bear ]      
  • Posted: 07 June 2012 12:55 PM #57

    Drew Bear - 07 June 2012 03:37 PM

    Nearly 1 of 4 iPhone buyers are upgrading from an Android phone.

    Need to see how many Android buyers are “upgrading” from an iPhone to put this number in context. I suspect it’s far less than 25% but I don’t really know.

         
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    Posted: 07 June 2012 09:08 PM #58

    adamthompson32 - 07 June 2012 03:55 PM
    Drew Bear - 07 June 2012 03:37 PM

    Nearly 1 of 4 iPhone buyers are upgrading from an Android phone.

    Need to see how many Android buyers are “upgrading” from an iPhone to put this number in context. I suspect it’s far less than 25% but I don’t really know.

    It’d be difficult to conduct such a survey across multiple Android models. You could possibly survey Galaxy S3 buyers, but that is likely to skew the numbers towards the high range. People buying the cheaper Android phones are probably not ditching an iPhone to do so.

    I don’t have the links, but it seems to me that most customer satisfaction surveys peg the iPhone in the 90+% range. Roughly 9 of every 10 iPhone users will buy another iPhone. So at most 1 of 10 iPhone users will switch to an Android phone. I agree that we don’t really “know”.

         
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    Posted: 23 July 2012 04:00 PM #59

    There will always be a segment of consumers that will never tire of Android because they prefer to pirate apps. This fact probably means that many developers will tire of Android. Remember all those predictions last year that Android apps would soon outnumber iOS apps. That hasn’t happened and doesn’t look like it’s going to happen this year either. Why not?

    Aaron Souppouris for The Verge:

    Dead Trigger, a zombie FPS for smartphones from the makers of Shadowgun, is now free to download on Android thanks to rampant piracy on the platform. In a statement on Facebook, developer Madfinger Games says that even at $0.99, the piracy rate on Android devices was ?unbelievably high.?

    Anecdotally, I?ve heard similar stories from other game developers. While piracy on jailbroken iPhones can lead to a loss of income for iOS developers as well, most everyone agrees that the problem isn?t just rampant on Android devices ? it?s endemic.

    http://www.loopinsight.com/2012/07/23/android-game-developer-makes-title-free-because-of-piracy/

         
  • Posted: 23 July 2012 04:46 PM #60

    adamthompson32 - 24 May 2012 02:55 AM

    They already know it isn’t easy. They just spent $12.5 billion proving they know that. But even $12.5 billion won’t make it all that much easier. Google, after all these years, is still clamoring to find another real revenue source and, so far, no dice.

    Look at their business model and you can see why.

    MSFT (an OS licensor) has had a helluva time creating another revenue source.  The problem is MSFT’s reliance on its licensing partners.

    Google is doing the same thing.  The problem is that firms with a hardware slant on things, aren’t going to be any more creative/innovative than the software they license.  Think of all those manufacturing partners, as a different version of Foxconn without the design excellence of an Apple.

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