Is the public finally growing tired of Android?

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    Posted: 11 September 2012 12:24 AM #76

    veritas - 10 September 2012 06:38 PM

    What of the latest PED article re: Android? Are we heads in the sand or hoping iPhone 5 cures all ills?

    A link to the article would help. If you are referring to the title of this thread, then I think most of us know that Android is not going to die or anything like that. The still very large wave of first-time smartphone buyers may (depends on what Apple does with the 3GS this week) continue to head for the Android cheap seats.

    But, and this is primarily in the U.S. market, a significant chunk of those consumers who bought Android devices in 2010 and are now upgrading their phones, could very well buy an iPhone this time around. It is the beginning of a turning. Some of the public are beginning to tire of Android.

    That’s why this PED article points out that the U.S. market share split is 52%/34% Android/iPhone, while the global numbers are more like 60/20. Maybe the U.S. market is unique. Or maybe it is a leading indicator of what the global market will become.

         
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    Posted: 11 September 2012 01:14 AM #77

    Oh, that article about Android WINNING™ among teens in the US?

    Well, let’s see how that picture looks after one or two full quarters of iPhone 5 sales.  The curse of Apple and Apple shareholders is that product cycles are, well, cyclical.  Feast in the first two quarters of availability - then a dropoff in YOY growth.  It’s a bit like iPod in its heyday, but not.  Demand wanes the closer one gets to the 12-month interval between products.  The competition will use that time to move newer product against Apple’s older product.  And then Apple will have the newer product, and the process repeats.  I have consistently said that the only metric that matters is growth (preferably of the organic, sustainable variety at this point in time).  Without it, you have Nokia, RIM, etc.  I could be wrong, but since Apple and profit are pretty much assumed most of the time, I figure growth is the most important metric to pay attention to.

    Also, heads in the sand and cure-alls sounds like trolling, because you’re leaving out other options.  You’re not trolling, right, because there’s more than one way to look at the data, and the smartphone wars in general.

    [ Edited: 11 September 2012 01:19 AM by Mav ]

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  • Posted: 14 September 2012 01:14 PM #78

    Just saw this in a Groupon Goods e-mail:


    10’’ Motorola HD Xoom Tablet
    Tablet with Android 3.0 operating system and WiFi connectivity backed by 1G Hz processor; 10.1-inch display protected by Gorilla Glass
    $600 $259 (57% off)


    http://www.groupon.com/deals/gg-10-inch-motorola-xoom-tablet?utm_medium=email&utm_source=channel_goods-deals&sid=11256055&user=868629b4ad929b813f9a9935812bf2a37560b6053d61bc94621e0f1f4111e95c&utm_campaign=11256055&s=body&d=gg-10-inch-motorola-xoom-tablet&p=1&c=deal_product-name


    I’m terribly worried that Apple is not taking advantage of all available distribution channels.  : )

         
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    Posted: 15 September 2012 03:06 PM #79

    I’m not sure how critical this is for the larger Android world, but it’s certainly something that will give the enterprise market pause. I think it will also eventually creep up on high-end users, the ones who have the most (credit card, bank, brokerage, etc. info) to lose.

    Android Warning: 50% Of Devices Need Patching

    Android mobile device users beware: The volume of malware targeting Android devices, according to a new study, has increased by a factor of 41 from less than a year ago. Alarmingly, new research also finds that more than half of all Android devices sport unpatched vulnerabilities, owing to device manufacturers and carriers failing to issue timely patches for devices that consumers have already purchased.

    ... unfortunately, the actual quantity of unpatched Android devices may actually exceed 50%. “We feel this is actually a fairly conservative estimate based on our preliminary results…

    http://www.informationweek.com/security/mobile/android-warning-50-of-devices-need-patch/240007264

         
  • Posted: 15 September 2012 05:53 PM #80

    Drew Bear, if you haven’t already, and if you have the time, check out Horace’s (Asymco) podcast last week where at the very end he discusses Android. It is a viewpoint that I think you would most likely agree with. I like Horace - never met him but he is so well-spoken and . . .  to my mind anyway, entirely rational in most of what he discusses.

         
  • Posted: 15 September 2012 06:33 PM #81

    To tell everyone the truth (as befits my name), I have taken to listening to Horace’s podcasts while falling asleep. His voice is so soothing and thought-provoking and generally pro-Apple that I fall asleep quite happily.

    No, I am not a shill for Asymco. Try it yourself just once and you will see . . .

         
  • Posted: 20 September 2012 02:01 AM #82

    What is “Android”? Is it a viable operating system, an eco-system or merely a means for OEMs to bring handsets to market without the expense of an OS licensing fee?

    If people are tired of Android, what would be causing the fatigue?

         
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    Posted: 22 September 2012 11:59 PM #83

    DawnTreader - 20 September 2012 02:01 AM

    What is “Android”? Is it a viable operating system, an eco-system or merely a means for OEMs to bring handsets to market without the expense of an OS licensing fee?

    If people are tired of Android, what would be causing the fatigue?

    One of the challenges IMO is the low end handset user never focused on the OS, so as Google attempts to extend the Android brand toward the low end handset, most folks don’t care.  Are we buying a mobile computer or a portable telephone.  Obviously two different markets but Apple is only competing in one.  Part of the reason Apple struggles in the emerging market is they make no attempt to sell the next great phone .  Their goal is to convince the world they need a pocket computer with always on data.  apple can wait for people to understand the value of a pocket computer, while android has many masters.

         
  • Posted: 23 September 2012 10:49 PM #84

    pats - 22 September 2012 11:59 PM
    DawnTreader - 20 September 2012 02:01 AM

    What is “Android”? Is it a viable operating system, an eco-system or merely a means for OEMs to bring handsets to market without the expense of an OS licensing fee?

    If people are tired of Android, what would be causing the fatigue?

    One of the challenges IMO is the low end handset user never focused on the OS, so as Google attempts to extend the Android brand toward the low end handset, most folks don’t care.  Are we buying a mobile computer or a portable telephone.  Obviously two different markets but Apple is only competing in one.  Part of the reason Apple struggles in the emerging market is they make no attempt to sell the next great phone .  Their goal is to convince the world they need a pocket computer with always on data.  apple can wait for people to understand the value of a pocket computer, while android has many masters.

    Pat:

    Excellent points. I’ve said for quite awhile Android handset makers compete more with one another than any one handset maker competes with Apple.

         
  • Posted: 11 October 2013 12:41 PM #85

    I recently bought an HTC One and a Samsung Galaxy Note 8. I’ve been an iPhone users since day one, and a software developer for years. I thought I might expand beyond the IOS ecosystem into Android software.

    Android may outsell IOS 4 to 1, but in mobile web traffic, IOS is 4 times more prevalent than Android. Development is fragmented, and the effort to deal with the diversity of platforms, screen resolution/aspect ratio difference, etc., make the effort vs. return, marginal at best.

    My observations: Android feels like IOS did a couple of years ago - an island unto itself, with incomplete / immature applications that are not fully connected / shared with their desktop counterparts. The inconsistency of applications makes for a far greater learning curve (a lesson repeatedly proven in the radically lower operational costs of OS X vs Windows). The Android world is just not smoothly connected, and the platform vendors have yet to completely learn that it is not just the handset, but the entire ecosystem, from development, to deployment, to smooth and consistent user experience. Android feels like a hodge-podge of thrown together stuff, with no grand plan. It is certainly not the “plug-and-go” of the Apple world, with multiple apps, and manual processes to sync what is a one-click operation in iTunes.

    Even between the HTC One and the Galaxy Note 8, the operational differences were so significant to be frustrating. Long press, or go to setting, and find something - inconsistent, inconsistent, inconsistent = frustrating, frustrating, frustrating.

    I am back on my old iPhone, and disappointed that I blew a 2 year carrier upgrade cycle on this. Android has a long ways to go, to herd the cats into a synergistic group of functions.