Have Manufacturers Tired of Android?

  • Posted: 10 August 2011 01:13 PM

    Interesting comment by the CEO of Motorola.

    http://tinyurl.com/Android-Defections-Beginning ?

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  • Posted: 10 August 2011 01:26 PM #1

    Gregg Thurman - 10 August 2011 04:13 PM

    Interesting comment by the CEO of Motorola.

    http://tinyurl.com/Android-Defections-Beginning ?

    He didn’t say anything about “defections beginning”.  He merely mentioned that he was open to the idea of a Windows phone if it proves viable and he can get terms similar to Nokia.  My first thought is that if Nokia can magically show Windows to be a viable platform there’s no way in hell that Motorola gets the same terms so he’s dreaming.  Additionally, he’s losing ground to Samsung and HTC on the Android side.  I guess it wasn’t a badly handled interview because this is all better than the truth which is ‘I’m so screwed’.

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  • Posted: 10 August 2011 01:34 PM #2

    BillH - 10 August 2011 04:26 PM
    Gregg Thurman - 10 August 2011 04:13 PM

    Interesting comment by the CEO of Motorola.

    http://tinyurl.com/Android-Defections-Beginning ?

    He didn’t say anything about “defections beginning”.  He merely mentioned that he was open to the idea of a Windows phone if it proves viable and he can get terms similar to Nokia.  My first thought is that if Nokia can magically show Windows to be a viable platform there’s no way in hell that Motorola gets the same terms so he’s dreaming.  Additionally, he’s losing ground to Samsung and HTC on the Android side.  I guess it wasn’t a badly handled interview because this is all better than the truth which is ‘I’m so screwed’.

    I was probably a little too obtuse with the name of my shortened URL.  That’s why I put the question mark behind it.  It’s meant to be a question, not a statement of fact.

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  • Posted: 10 August 2011 01:40 PM #3

    Gregg Thurman - 10 August 2011 04:34 PM
    BillH - 10 August 2011 04:26 PM
    Gregg Thurman - 10 August 2011 04:13 PM

    Interesting comment by the CEO of Motorola.

    http://tinyurl.com/Android-Defections-Beginning ?

    He didn’t say anything about “defections beginning”.  He merely mentioned that he was open to the idea of a Windows phone if it proves viable and he can get terms similar to Nokia.  My first thought is that if Nokia can magically show Windows to be a viable platform there’s no way in hell that Motorola gets the same terms so he’s dreaming.  Additionally, he’s losing ground to Samsung and HTC on the Android side.  I guess it wasn’t a badly handled interview because this is all better than the truth which is ‘I’m so screwed’.

    I was probably a little too obtuse with the name of my shortened URL.  That’s why I put the question mark behind it.  It’s meant to be a question, not a statement of fact.

    Ah.  I read it twice thinking I missed something so I thought I’d save others some time.  I get what you’re saying though and think it’s worth discussing.  Android may well qualify for SJ’s blue ray label.  “Bag of Hurt”!  tongue laugh

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  • Posted: 10 August 2011 02:03 PM #4

    In other words the Xoom isn’t doing well at all and Motorola is focusing on smart phones. The Droid was somewhat successful when pushed hard by Verizon but Moto make look to alternatives as more Android players enter the field.

    If Nokia is able to make a market for Windows Phone Moto will be hard pressed to get the same terms.

         
  • Posted: 10 August 2011 02:49 PM #5

    Motorola Mobility is a very marginal company and they are looking for a life line.  The odds are against their survival.  The senior company knows this, which is why they established this division as a separate entity.  In good times they could probably hang on (prolong the pain) for quite a while, but in this economy I don’t believe it will take long.

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  • Posted: 15 August 2011 03:00 PM #6

    westech - 10 August 2011 05:49 PM

    Motorola Mobility is a very marginal company and they are looking for a life line.  The odds are against their survival.  The senior company knows this, which is why they established this division as a separate entity.  In good times they could probably hang on (prolong the pain) for quite a while, but in this economy I don’t believe it will take long.

    Well, they got their lifeline

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  • Posted: 15 August 2011 07:03 PM #7

    westech - 15 August 2011 06:00 PM
    westech - 10 August 2011 05:49 PM

    Motorola Mobility is a very marginal company and they are looking for a life line.  The odds are against their survival.  The senior company knows this, which is why they established this division as a separate entity.  In good times they could probably hang on (prolong the pain) for quite a while, but in this economy I don’t believe it will take long.

    Well, they got their lifeline

    Motorola certainly got the better of this deal.  For $12.5 Billion Coogle, or anybody for that matter, could have developed a proprietary mobile OS that was just killer, and got massive change.  And what Google needed was a killer OS.  Sure they got several thousand patents, but how many are relevant to mobile, and how many of those are important enough to force negotiation vs litigation?

    I have yet to see a buyout of a large Company succeed.  This one is going to be no different than any of the others.

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  • Posted: 15 August 2011 10:32 PM #8

    Gregg Thurman - 15 August 2011 10:03 PM

    [...]

    I have yet to see a buyout of a large Company succeed.  This one is going to be no different than any of the others.

    I must assume you don’t mean that literally.  Exxon - Mobil.  Lockheed - Martin.  Union Pacific.  Sanofi - Aventis.  Royal Dutch - Shell.  Georgia Pacific - Great Northern.  HP - Apollo.  IBM - Price Waterhouse.

    Google could turn up others, but your point is well-taken.

         
  • Posted: 16 August 2011 01:20 AM #9

    Gregg Thurman - 15 August 2011 10:03 PM
    westech - 15 August 2011 06:00 PM
    westech - 10 August 2011 05:49 PM

    Motorola Mobility is a very marginal company and they are looking for a life line.  The odds are against their survival.  The senior company knows this, which is why they established this division as a separate entity.  In good times they could probably hang on (prolong the pain) for quite a while, but in this economy I don’t believe it will take long.

    Well, they got their lifeline

    Motorola certainly got the better of this deal.

    This is a great, great deal for Motorola. They get 12.5 billion from Google. Did you know that they get 2.5 billion if the deal falls through? They get to remain a stand alone company - maybe. They may even get spun off by Google. Even if they’re folded up by Google, they can blame Google for any failings.

    it was a brilliant move for their stockholders and their CEO.

         
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    Posted: 16 August 2011 01:48 AM #10

    FalKirk - 16 August 2011 04:20 AM

    This is a great, great deal for Motorola. They get 12.5 billion from Google. Did you know that they get 2.5 billion if the deal falls through? They get to remain a stand alone company - maybe. They may even get spun off by Google. Even if they’re folded up by Google, they can blame Google for any failings.

    it was a brilliant move for their stockholders and their CEO.

    Absolutely! Jha probably did a Tiger-like fist pump and screamed “YEAH!!” at the top of his lungs. I’ll bet thousands of shareholders did the same.

    Motorola was supposed to have a great 2011, but all their new products (Xoom, Atrix, etc.) have been duds or delayed so they could “get it right”. This Google deal, whether it gets approved or not, saves their butts.

         
  • Posted: 16 August 2011 02:30 AM #11

    I’m sure most all of us read Gruber on our own, but he had a great take on why Google paid so much for a company that is, frankly, just a mess.

    I think Motorola knew they had Google by the balls. Google needed Motorola?s patent library to defend Android as a whole, Motorola knew it, and they made Google pay and pay handsomely. I don?t think it?s curious at all why Google didn?t simply license Motorola?s patents. Motorola held out for a full acquisition at a premium far above the company?s actual value, and threatened to go after its sibling Android partners if Google didn?t acquiesce.

         
  • Posted: 16 August 2011 03:19 PM #12

    FalKirk - 16 August 2011 05:30 AM

    I’m sure most all of us read Gruber on our own, but he had a great take on why Google paid so much for a company that is, frankly, just a mess.

    I think Motorola knew they had Google by the balls. Google needed Motorola?s patent library to defend Android as a whole, Motorola knew it, and they made Google pay and pay handsomely. I don?t think it?s curious at all why Google didn?t simply license Motorola?s patents. Motorola held out for a full acquisition at a premium far above the company?s actual value, and threatened to go after its sibling Android partners if Google didn?t acquiesce.

    Also, from Google’s point of view, owning the patents gives them the ability to guarantee their hardware clients (Samsung, HTC, etc) will not have to worry about patent lawsuits. Plus they may also be able to trade patent features with Apple, without either getting litigious.

         
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    Posted: 16 August 2011 03:44 PM #13

    willrob - 16 August 2011 06:19 PM

    Also, from Google’s point of view, owning the patents gives them the ability to guarantee their hardware clients (Samsung, HTC, etc) will not have to worry about patent lawsuits. Plus they may also be able to trade patent features with Apple, without either getting litigious.

    Apple is already in litigation with Motorola. This buyout only means that Google gets directly involved. Google itself doesn’t bring anything to the table that will make Apple back off.

    Whether or not this acquisition helps protect their hardware partners from patent lawsuits depends on how the pending litigation is resolved. Samsung & HTC (along with Motorola) are already involved in lawsuits with Apple, so the biggest hardware partners aren’t going to get any help from this buyout.

    I don’t think there’s any doubt that Apple is using some of Motorola’s IP. There’s also no doubt that Moto is using some of Apple’s IP. They will eventually come to some sort of an agreement, but somehow I doubt that Apple will make the agreement extend to cover all other Android manufacturers.

    Edited to remove redundant phrase “agree to make the agreement”.  rolleyes

    [ Edited: 16 August 2011 05:25 PM by Drew Bear ]      
  • Posted: 16 August 2011 04:51 PM #14

    willrob - 16 August 2011 06:19 PM

    Also, from Google’s point of view, owning the patents gives them the ability to guarantee their hardware clients (Samsung, HTC, etc) will not have to worry about patent lawsuits.

    I know that this is one of the reason’s why Google decided to acquire Motorola, but talk about convoluted! Google gives away its operating system for free and then one of its partners threatens to sue all the others so Google has to spend 12.5 million dollars to protect those partners from themselves even thought they are making Google no money. Bizarre.

         
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    Posted: 16 August 2011 05:11 PM #15

    FalKirk - 16 August 2011 07:51 PM
    willrob - 16 August 2011 06:19 PM

    Also, from Google’s point of view, owning the patents gives them the ability to guarantee their hardware clients (Samsung, HTC, etc) will not have to worry about patent lawsuits.

    I know that this is one of the reason’s why Google decided to acquire Motorola, but talk about convoluted! Google gives away its operating system for free and then one of its partners threatens to sue all the others so Google has to spend 12.5 million dollars to protect those partners from themselves even thought they are making Google no money. Bizarre.

    I don’t think Google buying Moto provides protection for Samsung and HTC.  It provides protection for themselves, but unless they agree to some type of indemnity then HTC and Samsung will need to battle with Apple or Microsoft with their own assets.  Microsoft has a huge portfolio of patents so It’s not like they are suddenly fearful of Google.  Google is trying to even the playing field by buying their seat at the table and 12.5B was the price to remain relevant.  Apple seems to be focused for the most part on things which made the iPhone unique, which is what a patent should be about.