Good-bye Android

  • Avatar

    Posted: 28 December 2011 02:55 PM #16

    I just popped in to point out that Gregg’s fanboy math, which he cribbed from a commenter on another site (copy much?) is bogus, and provide some information that might help you evaluate disparate numbers in context.

         
  • Avatar

    Posted: 28 December 2011 03:14 PM #17

    Brad Hutchings (Bosco) - 28 December 2011 06:55 PM

    I just popped in to point out that Gregg’s fanboy math, which he cribbed from a commenter on another site (copy much?) is bogus, and provide some information that might help you evaluate disparate numbers in context.

    2012 will be a much different market place for smartphones then 2011.  I expect android rate of growth to slow and based on the numbers provided by Andy Rubin, it is already happening.  Andy never says how he calculates the rate. Is it a peak snap-shot rate some type of daily average.  We all know that daily rates fluctuate significantly so without a few more qualifiers trying to reach conclusions based on these data points has potentially huge error.  Google is trying to water everyone’s eyes with huge numbers, then when we see the stats like the web browsing stats or app downloads, we get confused because despite the fact they have these huge numbers of activations the other data like web usage and app downloads are actually lower then for Apple’s iOS devices, and while you can sweep all of that under the rug, common sense says that we have a large amount of android activations which are not being used as smartphones, but they are compared as equals in the eyes of the pundits attempting to determine who’s supposedly winning in this fabricated OS race.

         
  • Posted: 28 December 2011 03:39 PM #18

    Well a big difference in Apple’s posted numbers and Google’s is that Google is purely using these numbers for marketing purpose. It is usually via a tweet or during a conf. Where as Apple’s numbers are part of financial info represented in 10Q statements.

    Google needs to keep throwing these numbers mostly to attract and retain developers.

    Apple has mainly focussed on providing $$s returned to developers as a way to attract and retain developers.

         
  • Avatar

    Posted: 28 December 2011 03:48 PM #19

    Brad Hutchings (Bosco) - 28 December 2011 05:23 PM

    Actually, pats, Andy Rubin of Google has defined what their activation numbers mean. It’s much more conservative than you pretend. It’s basically Android phones and tablets with a wireless contract licensed to use Google apps.

    Exact words used by Andy Rubin is:

    and for those wondering, we count each device only once (ie, we don’t count re-sold devices), and “activations” means you go into a store, buy a device, put it on the network by subscribing to a wireless service.

    No mention of Google apps.

    Signature

    Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.  - Steve Jobs

         
  • Avatar

    Posted: 28 December 2011 03:53 PM #20

    Seriously pats, if you’d been participating in forums during the American Revolutionary War against the British, you’d be claiming that the British were winning because they were the only side whose soldiers you could count in formation on the battlefield.

    I’ll tell you a little story… The day the Galaxy Nexus came out, I went into a Verizon store to get one, and the rep there hadn’t been trained on the phone yet. Another customer was in there trying to decide between an iPhone 4S and the GN to replace his BlackBerry. I asked him where he commuted to, and in about 15 seconds, added a widget to the GN’s home screen which displayed a red, yellow, or green light to indicate traffic and travel time from current location. This stuff is all built in on any Gingerbread or later Android phone. No Market download required. Still can’t do that on an iPhone.

    When I purchased my new phone, I signed into my Google account, and it immediately downloaded contacts, bookmarks, and apps I had on my Nexus One, which I’ve been using for almost 2 years. No plugging into a computer, no lengthy “sync” step. I signed into the Amazon MP3 app and had all my favorite music moved to the phone while having coffee with a friend.

    As to developers… An Android developer can take his skills and make apps for a variety of products now, from phones to tablets that work with Market to vertical tabs like Kindle Fire and B&N Nook Color, and even wristwatches like the WIMM One. The numbers Google occasionally give out lend support to the intuitive story that having a community of stakeholders rather than a dictator in the middle is a better long term business proposition.

         
  • Avatar

    Posted: 28 December 2011 04:05 PM #21

    You’re right, Mace. He didn’t explicitly say “Google apps”. You have to know a little about how Android is licensed and how devices like Kindle Fire and B&N Nook Color work to divine that. I often forget that this forum’s treatment of all things Android is like a bunch of blind people standing under an elephant bull and describing what they feel above them .

         
  • Posted: 28 December 2011 04:29 PM #22

    Brad:

    I asked him where he commuted to, and in about 15 seconds, added a widget to the GN?s home screen which displayed a red, yellow, or green light to indicate traffic and travel time from current location. This stuff is all built in on any Gingerbread or later Android phone. No Market download required. Still can?t do that on an iPhone.

    I got my wife an unlocked 3GS for Christmas for her T-Mobile account (which still has a year to run).  She had everything transferred and had the red, green, and yellow traffic report signals pulled up within about 5 minutes of opening the box.  No widget involved. Next?

    Brad:

    I often forget that this forum?s treatment of all things Android is like a bunch of blind people standing under an elephant bull and describing what they feel above them.

    If you made an attempt to sound a little less like a condescending pompous ass people might attach some value to what you say.  As it is, you’re just an annoyance.  People here are neither stupid nor naive, so go pretend to be superior somewhere else.

         
  • Avatar

    Posted: 28 December 2011 04:48 PM #23

    +

    I was at my local AT&T store yesterday, where I’d hoped to upgrade my iPhone 4 to a black 32GB 4S. The only 4S model they had in stock was one single 64GB model, in white. According to the rep behind the counter, every iPhone 4S they get in typically sells out on that same day. Granted, I didn’t ask how fast Android phones sell out at that particular store, but I think it somewhat telling that iPhones at an AT&T store (hardly the most popular network, especially in my area) fly off the shelves the moment they’re in stock.

    In any case, I placed an order, and my shiny new 32GB black iPhone 4S is due to arrive tomorrow. smile

    Signature

    mrmwebmax (formerly mrmgraphics)
    Max out your site! mrmwebmax.com

         
  • Avatar

    Posted: 28 December 2011 04:55 PM #24

    Brad Hutchings (Bosco) - 28 December 2011 07:53 PM

    Seriously pats, if you’d been participating in forums during the American Revolutionary War against the British, you’d be claiming that the British were winning because they were the only side whose soldiers you could count in formation on the battlefield.

    I’ll tell you a little story… The day the Galaxy Nexus came out, I went into a Verizon store to get one, and the rep there hadn’t been trained on the phone yet. Another customer was in there trying to decide between an iPhone 4S and the GN to replace his BlackBerry. I asked him where he commuted to, and in about 15 seconds, added a widget to the GN’s home screen which displayed a red, yellow, or green light to indicate traffic and travel time from current location. This stuff is all built in on any Gingerbread or later Android phone. No Market download required. Still can’t do that on an iPhone.

    When I purchased my new phone, I signed into my Google account, and it immediately downloaded contacts, bookmarks, and apps I had on my Nexus One, which I’ve been using for almost 2 years. No plugging into a computer, no lengthy “sync” step. I signed into the Amazon MP3 app and had all my favorite music moved to the phone while having coffee with a friend.

    As to developers… An Android developer can take his skills and make apps for a variety of products now, from phones to tablets that work with Market to vertical tabs like Kindle Fire and B&N Nook Color, and even wristwatches like the WIMM One. The numbers Google occasionally give out lend support to the intuitive story that having a community of stakeholders rather than a dictator in the middle is a better long term business proposition.

    Well Brad I have actually been on a battlefield and that may be the reason I can see through Andy’s counting of Google activations.  You can’t get past fanboy rants when someone questions a number.  Last I checked, you didn’t need a computer to activate an iPhone or transfer you music, contacts, bookmarks and apps, but let’s concede that Google copied from the best and will have their day in court to prove they didn’t, and until then Android has a dark cloud over their use of Apple’s multi touch IP.  As far as Goggle Maps, it is an outstanding example of where Google leads the market and Apple relies on their work, but if I was a betting man, I would put my money on Apple severing that tie with their next release of their maps application.

         
  • Posted: 28 December 2011 05:05 PM #25

    The thermonuclear strike will be when Apple releases a web search application and makes it the default search, displacing Google.

    Wouldn’t it be refreshing to use a search engine without gratuitous and unwanted advertising?  Or one where the results are not skewed by bribery and trickery?  How quickly do you think advertising revenues for Google’s search engine would drop?

         
  • Posted: 28 December 2011 05:11 PM #26

    pats - 28 December 2011 08:55 PM
    Brad Hutchings (Bosco) - 28 December 2011 07:53 PM

    Seriously pats, if you’d been participating in forums during the American Revolutionary War against the British, you’d be claiming that the British were winning because they were the only side whose soldiers you could count in formation on the battlefield.

    I’ll tell you a little story… The day the Galaxy Nexus came out, I went into a Verizon store to get one, and the rep there hadn’t been trained on the phone yet. Another customer was in there trying to decide between an iPhone 4S and the GN to replace his BlackBerry. I asked him where he commuted to, and in about 15 seconds, added a widget to the GN’s home screen which displayed a red, yellow, or green light to indicate traffic and travel time from current location. This stuff is all built in on any Gingerbread or later Android phone. No Market download required. Still can’t do that on an iPhone.

    When I purchased my new phone, I signed into my Google account, and it immediately downloaded contacts, bookmarks, and apps I had on my Nexus One, which I’ve been using for almost 2 years. No plugging into a computer, no lengthy “sync” step. I signed into the Amazon MP3 app and had all my favorite music moved to the phone while having coffee with a friend.

    As to developers… An Android developer can take his skills and make apps for a variety of products now, from phones to tablets that work with Market to vertical tabs like Kindle Fire and B&N Nook Color, and even wristwatches like the WIMM One. The numbers Google occasionally give out lend support to the intuitive story that having a community of stakeholders rather than a dictator in the middle is a better long term business proposition.

    Well Brad I have actually been on a battlefield and that may be the reason I can see through Andy’s counting of Google activations.  You can’t get past fanboy rants when someone questions a number.  Last I checked, you didn’t need a computer to activate an iPhone or transfer you music, contacts, bookmarks and apps, but let’s concede that Google copied from the best and will have their day in court to prove they didn’t, and until then Android has a dark cloud over their use of Apple’s multi touch IP.  As far as Goggle Maps, it is an outstanding example of where Google leads the market and Apple relies on their work, but if I was a betting man, I would put my money on Apple severing that tie with their next release of their maps application.

    +1

         
  • Posted: 28 December 2011 05:13 PM #27

    mrmgraphics - 28 December 2011 08:48 PM

    +

    I was at my local AT&T store yesterday, where I’d hoped to upgrade my iPhone 4 to a black 32GB 4S. The only 4S model they had in stock was one single 64GB model, in white. According to the rep behind the counter, every iPhone 4S they get in typically sells out on that same day. Granted, I didn’t ask how fast Android phones sell out at that particular store, but I think it somewhat telling that iPhones at an AT&T store (hardly the most popular network, especially in my area) fly off the shelves the moment they’re in stock.

    In any case, I placed an order, and my shiny new 32GB black iPhone 4S is due to arrive tomorrow. smile

    I posted my checks at ATT and Radio Shack just before Christmas.  Granted I did not inquire of all ten’s of thousands of Stores worldwide, but the responses I did get were very consistent.

    ATT = 85% - 90% total handset sales were iPhone
    Radio Shack = 50% of total handset sales were iPhone

    Oh, my neighbor (a pilot for Alaska Airlines) who was in love with her Android handset, just bought an iPhone 4S.  She uses an iPad in the cockpit, and is thinking about getting one for herself.  Anecdotal for sure, but the thing is, I (personal experience) never hear of someone going from iPhone to Android.

    Signature

    You can’t do more, make more, be more, than the next guy, if you think like the next guy. Think different.

         
  • Avatar

    Posted: 28 December 2011 05:21 PM #28

    +

    Gregg Thurman - 28 December 2011 09:13 PM

    Anecdotal for sure, but the thing is, I (personal experience) never hear of someone going from iPhone to Android.

    Same here. Likewise, I have never heard any iPhone owner complain about their iPhone, but have heard plenty of complaints from users of Android phones.

    At the same time, an amazing number of people where I work are making the ultimate switch: They’re going Mac. And as for tablets, I know of a number of people with iPads, but not a single individual with any other tablet.

    Signature

    mrmwebmax (formerly mrmgraphics)
    Max out your site! mrmwebmax.com

         
  • Avatar

    Posted: 28 December 2011 05:43 PM #29

    Well pats, print yourself up a certificate and hold a parade. There’s nothing to see through in Rubin’s numbers. The Apple fanboy deconstructions you all seem so proud of today are just wrong.

    And seriously, you guys are at an all time low, holding onto some hope that the courts will fix everything that was “stolen” from Apple. Did the hope that Apple would try making competitive products die?

         
  • Posted: 28 December 2011 06:10 PM #30

    Zeke - 28 December 2011 09:05 PM

    The thermonuclear strike will be when Apple releases a web search application and makes it the default search, displacing Google.

    Wouldn’t it be refreshing to use a search engine without gratuitous and unwanted advertising?  Or one where the results are not skewed by bribery and trickery?  How quickly do you think advertising revenues for Google’s search engine would drop?

    Or how about search results that DO NOT have the first 4 or 5 results be nothing more than links to other specialized search engines.

    There have been so many times that I had to click to page two, before I got results that matched my query, and weren’t just another search site, I’ve wanted to scream.

    Signature

    You can’t do more, make more, be more, than the next guy, if you think like the next guy. Think different.