Is MSFT fatally wounded by underestimating iOS?

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    Posted: 20 February 2012 01:38 PM #31

    vpndev - 20 February 2012 05:36 PM
    omacvi - 20 February 2012 05:26 PM
    vpndev - 20 February 2012 05:19 PM

    The interesting release would be Pages / Numbers / Keynote for Windows.

    I would *love* to see how that would go !

    Apple would never do that.  They want to promote the sale of hardware and there is no money in software.

    Puzzling. I thought that iTunes and Safari were available for Windows.

    Yes but iTunes helps sells iPods, iPhones, iPads, and Safari just points out there is a better browser then Explorer.

         
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    Posted: 20 February 2012 01:44 PM #32

    vpndev - 20 February 2012 05:33 PM
    Lee Dronick - 20 February 2012 04:30 PM

    It seems that Word is still pretty much a requirement for college students.

    I think you have to submit in Word format but you could probably use Pages to create it.

    I would love it if you could set a preference to “save” by default in Word format. That would be a real help.

    I tried to get my wife to create her assignments in Pages and export them Word format. It was easier for me to get her a copy of Office 2011.

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  • Posted: 20 February 2012 02:45 PM #33

    Zeke - 20 February 2012 05:37 PM
    pfuey - 20 February 2012 04:47 PM

    MSFT lost when they didn’t recognize the importance of interface in portable digital music, and left the creation of an ecosystem to Realnetworks and two dozen other half-assed efforts.

    MSFT lost the day they won their monopoly court battle.

    Microsoft lost the day they decided to create VISTA.  They were already years behind Apple in creating a new OS based on Unix/Linux.  They didn’t want to recognize that it was time to dump the crippled OSes (Windows and Mac 9.x) when PCs became capable of running a real OS.  Unix provided the security, and built in networking and scalability needed for Apple’s current products.  Microsoft’s decision to prop up their failing DOS based OS was the killer.  The only reason it ever existed in the first place was to be run on PCs with 256K of RAM and 2MB hard drives.  To try to make it compete with a real, industrial OS was their biggest mistake.

    Clearly, from the technical perspective, Vista helped hasten their eventual demise, but from the business perspective I still assert that they lost the day they won the monopoly court battle because that win allowed them to continue doing business in a “force down your throat” way as opposed to innovating to win the markets.

         
  • Posted: 20 February 2012 02:53 PM #34

    pfuey - 20 February 2012 06:45 PM
    Zeke - 20 February 2012 05:37 PM
    pfuey - 20 February 2012 04:47 PM

    MSFT lost when they didn’t recognize the importance of interface in portable digital music, and left the creation of an ecosystem to Realnetworks and two dozen other half-assed efforts.

    MSFT lost the day they won their monopoly court battle.

    Microsoft lost the day they decided to create VISTA.  They were already years behind Apple in creating a new OS based on Unix/Linux.  They didn’t want to recognize that it was time to dump the crippled OSes (Windows and Mac 9.x) when PCs became capable of running a real OS.  Unix provided the security, and built in networking and scalability needed for Apple’s current products.  Microsoft’s decision to prop up their failing DOS based OS was the killer.  The only reason it ever existed in the first place was to be run on PCs with 256K of RAM and 2MB hard drives.  To try to make it compete with a real, industrial OS was their biggest mistake.

    Clearly, from the technical perspective, Vista helped hasten their eventual demise, but from the business perspective I still assert that they lost the day they won the monopoly court battle because that win allowed them to continue doing business in a “force down your throat” way as opposed to innovating to win the markets.

    Microsoft did not win the anti-trust court case. Quite the contrary, the company lost big time. Although the District Court’s breakup remedy was sent back by the Court of Appeals, the higher court let stand the determination the company had established a monopoly in PC operating systems. That determination opened the floodgates of litigation because plaintiffs no longer needed to spend arduous months in court proving the company’s monopoly status. Plaintiffs had to only prove they were damaged by Microsoft’s use of its monopoly position in illegal ways.

    The determination that the company had established a monopoly and the fact that determination held up on appeal dramatically changed the company’s outcome and the ways in which it could approach the market.

         
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    Posted: 20 February 2012 03:18 PM #35

    I switched to OpenOffice a few years ago and it works great. I’ve written short stories, essays even a book with it. Calc fits all of my spreadsheet needs, limited though they may be. Where I’m working went to Office20010 last year, before I started with them. It’s terrible. The ribbon is the single worst GUI ever made without exception. Shortly after starting I put OpenOffice on my desktop (it’s GOOD to be the IT king). Most of my coworkers don’t even realize the documents I share with them aren’t done in Office.

    Win7 is an improvement over Vista. OTOH a dead armadillo on a hot Texas highway would be better than Vista. It’s also more secure than XP. Not as good as OS-X but most users don’t seem to know any better.

    It’s in the server room that MS has a stranglehold. Let’s be honest. WinServer is solid, stable, easy to configure and a known quantity for both IT and Management. Users don’t care what the server runs and those that make the decision like MS so that will be very slow to change. MS knows it too. The price for a Win08 server including CALs can be excruciating.

    So I see MS holding the line in the server room, staying about the same in the desktop PC, and not making any inroads into mobile. Of course all this is assuming they don’t try some nasty leveraging thing, like sending out a patch making all the pages served on WinServ08 only compatible with IE on Win7 or only letting Outlook read mail that comes from or goes to an exchange server or something like that. That sort of thing could mess up the tea leaves, but barring something stupid like that I don’t see any big MS resurgence. They just don’t know how to innovate and never have been able to see beyond next quarters profits.

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    Posted: 20 February 2012 04:22 PM #36

    Just a question.  How many of you use Pages or Numbers?

    I do.  In fact, I don’t need even the power of Pages and have used TextEdit for most of my school projects. (Then save as RTF or PDF to turn it in or take it to the school’s printer.)  I’ve done very little with Pages, but I use Numbers frequently.  My spreadsheets aren’t very complex, so maybe heaver spreadsheet users would need something Excel has, but I get along fine with Numbers. (But one of mine is too complex for OpenOffice.)

    Being a cheapskate, there’s no way I want to pay hundreds of $$$ for MS Office.  I have tried OpenOffice, but it’s actually quite horrible.  So the last time I bought a Mac I had iWorks included.  Mainly I wanted Numbers to replace OpenOffice Calc (for some personal finances math and graphing), but figured I should have Keynote too and didn’t mind getting Pages with it.

    BTW, I like MS Excel and Powerpoint, but I dislike MS Word.

    [ Edited: 20 February 2012 04:28 PM by webjprgm ]      
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    Posted: 20 February 2012 04:28 PM #37

    I too use Pages and Numbers. Most simple notes are done in TextEdit which is almost always open.

    We have Student and Home version of Office 11 which is installed on both MacBook Pros and my iMac. I rarely use it, my wife uses Word almost exclusively for her word recessing.

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    “Works of art, in my opinion, are the only objects in the material universe to possess internal order, and that is why, though I don’t believe that only art matters, I do believe in Art for Art’s sake.” E. M. Forster

         
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    Posted: 20 February 2012 04:37 PM #38

    mrmgraphics - 20 February 2012 03:55 PM

    ... Where IMHO MS is running a huge risk is that they are threatening their own entrenched place on the desktop for the sake of mobile by betting so much on a unified operating system for all devices. At best, workplaces may simply not upgrade to Windows 8. At worst, Win 8 could be such a disaster as to make companies start to look elsewhere—Mac? Linux?—and if that happens, then at some future point I could see even the Office franchise being threatened, too. But we are a long, long way from that, if it ever comes to pass.

    At worse, businesses won’t update to Win 8 and will wait for Win 9.  MS would have to make several bad OSes in a row before business will dump it, because as we’ve seen with WinXP they are willing to wait a long time before upgrading.

         
  • Posted: 20 February 2012 10:17 PM #39

    Windows will be going by the wayside at our shop.  With 1 million customers generating account usage data every 15 minutes, all of which need to be stored and validated, we have requirements that Windows can’t meet.  Every time we vintage a Windows server we are replacing it with Linux.

         
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    Posted: 20 February 2012 10:26 PM #40

    I primarily use MS Office.

    I’ve tried Numbers, but find it severely lacking in features, speed and capabilities. I can’t get it to handle importing of a raw feed the way I need, The capabilities in calculations are not there. When you have a 3D graph, though it will look nice, the spreadsheet slows down to a crawl. This on an 8-core MacPro with 10GB of RAM.

    Excel is fantastic.

    If you work for a large corporation, see if they have the Home Use Program (HUP) I got Office 2011 for Mac for $11.

         
  • Posted: 21 February 2012 11:47 AM #41

    MS Office is coming to the iPad: http://9to5mac.com/2012/02/21/microsoft-office-for-ipad-spotted-soon-to-hit-app-store/

         
  • Posted: 21 February 2012 11:49 AM #42

    mrmgraphics - 20 February 2012 03:55 PM

    +

    I work in an office setting, so using Microsoft Office is an absolute must. That doesn’t mean I like it, though, and I especially don’t like Word. It is always doing things I don’t want it to do, like indenting or changing fonts or making hyperlinks. It’s a word processor. It should get out of the way and let me type. Yet its like a constant battle just to get it to do what I want.

    . . .

    Until the day comes that offices don’t need spreadsheets, presentations, and word documents, Microsoft won’t be going away. Office is simply too entrenched, and issues of compatibility too serious for any mass migration away from those tools.

    . . .

    Strongly agree.  The new UI changes, and all the odd behaviors of Office are nasty, and always plaguing me.

    I do like the idea mentioned above.  I wish Apple would make a frontal attack on Office, providing real compatibility and good functionality.