Healthy competition to the iOS and OSX combination?

  • Posted: 05 March 2012 06:14 PM

    A glowing review of Windows 8 and Metro from Andy Ihnatko:

    http://www.suntimes.com/technology/ihnatko/10992191-452/windows-8-and-metro-show-true-multiplatform-os-promise.html

    [ Edited: 06 March 2012 03:14 PM by rob_london ]      
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    Posted: 05 March 2012 07:08 PM #1

    I was actually about to start a thread with the exact same theme.

    Jobs once said that PCs are Trucks, and Tablets are Cars, but in my opinion there maybe a large percentage of future buyers may opt for a SUV/Minivan.

    I believe apples only achilles heel at the moment is the fact that they are apparently unwilling (at least so far) to extend the touch interface of iOS to potential touchscreen Macs.

    The big opportunity that PC vendors will have once Windows 8 releases is the fact they will be able to build dual mode ultrabooks of macbook Air size with touch screens - combining a desktop interface for clamshell mode which converts into a potentially good enough touch screen tablet when the screen is swivelled 180 degrees and laid flat on top of the keyboard.

    I’ve been dreaming about an 11’ Macbook Air that can do this - essentially being able to change from Mac OS X in clamshell mode to iPad mode when the screen is swivelled and clamshell is closed.

    Apple has had a successful decade of cannibalizing its own products, but I think Apple current plans to keep the Mac & iPads as seperate devices when talking about UI control - Mac UI is keyboard/mouse/indirect touch(Trackpad), while iPad is a Direct MultiTouch UI - means both categories face competition from a class of device that fullfill both needs.

    Granted, I think iPad is less at risk of competition from a combo ultrabook+tablet device, seeing as the likely entry price will be close to $1000, but that pricepoint puts the entire Mac lineup in a more competitive space.

    I have faith that apple of course has already produced this sort of prototypes for its macbook line, and hope that the 2013 update of OS X will have a full MultiTOuch iOS layer included for 2013 touch screen macs.

    I don’t see why this wouldn’t happen - iPads will be priced from $399 up to $899, and macs will continue to start from $999 - so there will be no product confusion for the customer.

    Thoughts?

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  • Posted: 05 March 2012 07:29 PM #2

    Of course Apple had the problem of transitioning to a touch interface when users were unfamiliar with the concepts, and device performance, battery life and carrier bandwidth constraints were far more severe. It’s much easier for Microsoft to launch in late 2012 with sophisticated active tiles for multiple applications, doubtless obsoleting yet another generation of installed hardware.

    But iPad 3 has the screen resolution to display 16 iPhone screens simultaneously. Maybe Apple will make some slick new UI features in IOS 6.

         
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    Posted: 05 March 2012 08:33 PM #3

    Competition is good.

    But don’t nobody be thinking for a minute that Apple hasn’t given serious thought to further incorporating multi-touch to the desktop/laptop PC metaphor.  Apple is a touch OS pioneer, after all.  I’d bet a virtual dollar that something like the ModBook, only better, is being prototyped in Apple labs.

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  • Posted: 06 March 2012 04:17 AM #5

    So it doesn’t handle multiple monitors well. I half suspected that Andy ihnatko is a digital lifestyle plus writing user. The bad reviews come from real power users: multiple monitors plus heavyweight development tools. One commenter points out that with data in the cloud, for the majority, a PC is just a dumb terminal and is superfluous given phone, tablet and TV so it’s counterproductive to merge IOS and MacOS, or Metro and Windows 7.

         
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    Posted: 06 March 2012 05:09 AM #6

    sleepygeek - 06 March 2012 08:17 AM

    So it doesn’t handle multiple monitors well. I half suspected that Andy ihnatko is a digital lifestyle plus writing user. The bad reviews come from real power users: multiple monitors plus heavyweight development tools. One commenter points out that with data in the cloud, for the majority, a PC is just a dumb terminal and is superfluous given phone, tablet and TV so it’s counterproductive to merge IOS and MacOS, or Metro and Windows 7.

    As Horace Deidu quipped: “Whenever a geeK cries, a cash register rings”.(or something like that).

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  • Posted: 06 March 2012 07:13 AM #7

    I think Windows 8 will largely disappoint from trying to do too much.  And enterprise will be VERY slow at integrating touch, if they do at all.

    Some excellent analysis here:

    http://www.livingdigitally.net/2012/03/windows-8-a-giant-misstep-forward.html

         
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    Posted: 06 March 2012 12:59 PM #8

    Let me preface the following by stating that while I am definitely biased towards using OS X and iOS, I use Windows 7 on a very regular basis. I think it is - by far - the best version of Windows, and I don’t really have any problem with it, in general.

    Yesterday, I downloaded the Windows 8 preview and spent a three hours trying to use it as a desktop/mouse-driven OS. Plain and simple - it was horrible. The main way to activate many oft-needed commands was by using what are called ‘hot corners’ in OS X, and it took me quite a while to figure that out. Getting these to work was clumsy and they seemed haphazardly arranged. As for the tiles, meh. Maybe it’s just because it is so different than any UI I’ve used before, but it seemed very counter-intuitive to me. Then, having to switch back and forth between Tiles and the old Windows desktop was like using two UIs that were competing rather than cooperating.

    It looks like Windows 8 will work reasonably well on touch-controlled devices (if users can largely avoid using the Windows desktop) but I think it is definitive proof that trying to combine a ‘traditional’ OS/GUI, and one that is touch-based, is an idea that has a long way to go before it’s done right. Unless things change dramatically between now and when the final version is released, I predict Windows 8 to be about as popular as Windows Vista, if not worse.

    Oh, and other long-time Windows fans, that I know, feel the same way.

    [ Edited: 06 March 2012 01:02 PM by MOSiX Man ]

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    Posted: 06 March 2012 01:26 PM #9

    MOSiX Man - 06 March 2012 04:59 PM

    I use Windows 7 on a very regular basis. I think it is - by far - the best version of Windows, and I don’t really have any problem with it, in general.

    Agree.  My son installed Windows 7 on a Mac using bootcamp for playing games.  Windows is still the de facto platform for games.  Windows 7 is fast and stable, I’m truly surprised.

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  • Posted: 06 March 2012 03:02 PM #10

    Mace - 06 March 2012 05:26 PM

    Windows 7 is fast and stable, I’m truly surprised.

    Me too.  I’m NOT surprised with the frequency of updates to Win 7—it’s a pain.