Need Some Support

  • Posted: 08 June 2012 12:34 AM

    My girl friend and I got into a somewhat heated discussion about “common sense” tonight.  She says I don’t have any.  As an example she cited an incident that occurred last summer.

    The incident occurred at a wedding reception, in which I drove the wedded couple in one of my Buick convertibles (1941), and involved the father of the groom.  The father has been blind since birth.

    After hearing many in the party talking about how nice the “old” car was that chauffeured the Bride and Groom, he asked if he could sit in it (it was parked right in front of the reception hall).

    I put him in the driver’s seat, and while he felt his way around the dash I explained what he was feeling.  At that point I asked if he would like to start the car.  After overcoming initial hesitancy, I explained the function of the foot peddles and the starting sequence.  He did just fine and even revved the engine a bit.  The look on his face was of extreme pleasure.

    So I asked if he’d like to drive the Buick, and took him through some baby steps of shifting and letting the clutch out until he could feel it engage.  At a speed of about 1/2 MPH we moved forward about a foot, then shifted into reverse and went backward about a foot.  The look on his face was of pure joy.  The moment was truly priceless.  That’s when the crowd saw it was he behind the wheel of a moving vehicle and freaked out.

    I don’t see a problem with what I did.  Had we been able to take the experience further, and he bumped into something, I was fully prepared to deal with any resultant damage, but at 2 - 3 mph I wasn’t expecting any.  In exchange for that “risk” I got to share a moment that the father may remember for the rest of his life.

    So, based on the above, do I lack “common sense”?

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    Posted: 08 June 2012 12:53 AM #1

    Gregg Thurman - 08 June 2012 03:34 AM

    My girl friend and I got into a somewhat heated discussion about “common sense” tonight.  She says I don’t have any.  As an example she cited an incident that occurred last summer.

    The incident occurred at a wedding reception, in which I drove the wedded couple in one of my Buick convertibles (1941), and involved the father of the groom.  The father has been blind since birth.

    After hearing many in the party talking about how nice the “old” car was that chauffeured the Bride and Groom, he asked if he could sit in it (it was parked right in front of the reception hall).

    I put him in the driver’s seat, and while he felt his way around the dash I explained what he was feeling.  At that point I asked if he would like to start the car.  After overcoming initial hesitancy, I explained the function of the foot peddles and the starting sequence.  He did just fine and even revved the engine a bit.  The look on his face was of extreme pleasure.

    So I asked if he’d like to drive the Buick, and took him through some baby steps of shifting and letting the clutch out until he could feel it engage.  At a speed of about 1/2 MPH we moved forward about a foot, then shifted into reverse and went backward about a foot.  The look on his face was of pure joy.  The moment was truly priceless.  That’s when the crowd saw it was he behind the wheel of a moving vehicle and freaked out.

    I don’t see a problem with what I did.  Had we been able to take the experience further, and he bumped into something, I was fully prepared to deal with any resultant damage, but at 2 - 3 mph I wasn’t expecting any.  In exchange for that “risk” I got to share a moment that the father may remember for the rest of his life.

    So, based on the above, do I lack “common sense”?

    If the point is about the joy for the father of the groom, my answer is no. It was a nice gesture.

    If the point is about your relationship with your gf, my answer is yes. Just start the grovelling now and it will be over sooner.

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  • Posted: 08 June 2012 12:59 AM #2

    Gregg Thurman - 08 June 2012 03:34 AM

    My girl friend and I got into a somewhat heated discussion about “common sense” tonight.  She says I don’t have any.  As an example she cited an incident that occurred last summer.

    The incident occurred at a wedding reception, in which I drove the wedded couple in one of my Buick convertibles (1941), and involved the father of the groom.  The father has been blind since birth.

    After hearing many in the party talking about how nice the “old” car was that chauffeured the Bride and Groom, he asked if he could sit in it (it was parked right in front of the reception hall).

    I put him in the driver’s seat, and while he felt his way around the dash I explained what he was feeling.  At that point I asked if he would like to start the car.  After overcoming initial hesitancy, I explained the function of the foot peddles and the starting sequence.  He did just fine and even revved the engine a bit.  The look on his face was of extreme pleasure.

    So I asked if he’d like to drive the Buick, and took him through some baby steps of shifting and letting the clutch out until he could feel it engage.  At a speed of about 1/2 MPH we moved forward about a foot, then shifted into reverse and went backward about a foot.  The look on his face was of pure joy.  The moment was truly priceless.  That’s when the crowd saw it was he behind the wheel of a moving vehicle and freaked out.

    I don’t see a problem with what I did.  Had we been able to take the experience further, and he bumped into something, I was fully prepared to deal with any resultant damage, but at 2 - 3 mph I wasn’t expecting any.  In exchange for that “risk” I got to share a moment that the father may remember for the rest of his life.

    So, based on the above, do I lack “common sense”?

    You’re fine. They all needed a topic and you provided it. Think about it this way: common sense is so common that it doesnt mean smart. Its just common. How many of us have no common sense and buy only AAPL against all comon sense advice. She needs better example and she may want to talk about perception you’re creating rather then common sense.
    Then you lose.

         
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    Posted: 08 June 2012 01:26 AM #3

    Gregg Thurman - 08 June 2012 03:34 AM

    My girl friend and I got into a somewhat heated discussion about “common sense” tonight.  She says I don’t have any.  As an example she cited an incident that occurred last summer.

    The incident occurred at a wedding reception, in which I drove the wedded couple in one of my Buick convertibles (1941), and involved the father of the groom.  The father has been blind since birth.

    After hearing many in the party talking about how nice the “old” car was that chauffeured the Bride and Groom, he asked if he could sit in it (it was parked right in front of the reception hall).

    I put him in the driver’s seat, and while he felt his way around the dash I explained what he was feeling.  At that point I asked if he would like to start the car.  After overcoming initial hesitancy, I explained the function of the foot peddles and the starting sequence.  He did just fine and even revved the engine a bit.  The look on his face was of extreme pleasure.

    So I asked if he’d like to drive the Buick, and took him through some baby steps of shifting and letting the clutch out until he could feel it engage.  At a speed of about 1/2 MPH we moved forward about a foot, then shifted into reverse and went backward about a foot.  The look on his face was of pure joy.  The moment was truly priceless.  That’s when the crowd saw it was he behind the wheel of a moving vehicle and freaked out.

    I don’t see a problem with what I did.  Had we been able to take the experience further, and he bumped into something, I was fully prepared to deal with any resultant damage, but at 2 - 3 mph I wasn’t expecting any.  In exchange for that “risk” I got to share a moment that the father may remember for the rest of his life.

    So, based on the above, do I lack “common sense”?

    Where was the risk?  You took any possible financial “risk”.  There was no risk to persons. Heck, if I was with you I would have suggested we all go find a big empty mall parking lot and let the gentleman open that baby up to fifteen miles an hour and enjoy the thrill of second gear…..

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  • Posted: 08 June 2012 01:53 AM #4

    Reminds me of the Al Pacino scene in Scent of a Woman.  Can I call you Al now?

    Here ya go:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I3y2OvvuhDI

         
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    Posted: 08 June 2012 02:55 AM #5

    Total support, Gregg.

    glad to hear the story.

         
  • Posted: 08 June 2012 03:14 AM #6

    Red Shirted Ensign - 08 June 2012 04:26 AM
    Gregg Thurman - 08 June 2012 03:34 AM

    My girl friend and I got into a somewhat heated discussion about “common sense” tonight.  She says I don’t have any.  As an example she cited an incident that occurred last summer.

    The incident occurred at a wedding reception, in which I drove the wedded couple in one of my Buick convertibles (1941), and involved the father of the groom.  The father has been blind since birth.

    After hearing many in the party talking about how nice the “old” car was that chauffeured the Bride and Groom, he asked if he could sit in it (it was parked right in front of the reception hall).

    I put him in the driver’s seat, and while he felt his way around the dash I explained what he was feeling.  At that point I asked if he would like to start the car.  After overcoming initial hesitancy, I explained the function of the foot peddles and the starting sequence.  He did just fine and even revved the engine a bit.  The look on his face was of extreme pleasure.

    So I asked if he’d like to drive the Buick, and took him through some baby steps of shifting and letting the clutch out until he could feel it engage.  At a speed of about 1/2 MPH we moved forward about a foot, then shifted into reverse and went backward about a foot.  The look on his face was of pure joy.  The moment was truly priceless.  That’s when the crowd saw it was he behind the wheel of a moving vehicle and freaked out.

    I don’t see a problem with what I did.  Had we been able to take the experience further, and he bumped into something, I was fully prepared to deal with any resultant damage, but at 2 - 3 mph I wasn’t expecting any.  In exchange for that “risk” I got to share a moment that the father may remember for the rest of his life.

    So, based on the above, do I lack “common sense”?

    Where was the risk?  You took any possible financial “risk”.  There was no risk to persons. Heck, if I was with you I would have suggested we all go find a big empty mall parking lot and let the gentleman open that baby up to fifteen miles an hour and enjoy the thrill of second gear…..

    +1

         
  • Posted: 08 June 2012 03:20 AM #7

    Ask Ann Landers.

    Not touching this one.

    What kind of Mac did you say your friend was using?

         
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    Posted: 08 June 2012 07:57 AM #8

    Gregg,

    I think that was a beautiful thing you did for the father. He got to experience the joy of driving that beautiful car. As mentioned above, the risk was to the car, and that was your risk.

    I’m assuming that this was on a quite road or a private lane. If so, the people who freaked out were over reacting.

         
  • Posted: 08 June 2012 09:06 AM #9

    Is that the best example she could come up with?  Maybe she’s right-you’ve got the wrong girl friend.

    Good for you.

         
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    Posted: 08 June 2012 09:07 AM #10

    Sell the girlfriend - buy aapl leaps

         
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    Posted: 08 June 2012 09:11 AM #11

    Gregg Thurman - 08 June 2012 03:34 AM

    My girl friend and I got into a somewhat heated discussion about “common sense” tonight.  She says I don’t have any.  As an example she cited an incident that occurred last summer.

    The incident occurred at a wedding reception, in which I drove the wedded couple in one of my Buick convertibles (1941), and involved the father of the groom.  The father has been blind since birth.

    After hearing many in the party talking about how nice the “old” car was that chauffeured the Bride and Groom, he asked if he could sit in it (it was parked right in front of the reception hall).

    I put him in the driver’s seat, and while he felt his way around the dash I explained what he was feeling.  At that point I asked if he would like to start the car.  After overcoming initial hesitancy, I explained the function of the foot peddles and the starting sequence.  He did just fine and even revved the engine a bit.  The look on his face was of extreme pleasure.

    So I asked if he’d like to drive the Buick, and took him through some baby steps of shifting and letting the clutch out until he could feel it engage.  At a speed of about 1/2 MPH we moved forward about a foot, then shifted into reverse and went backward about a foot.  The look on his face was of pure joy.  The moment was truly priceless.  That’s when the crowd saw it was he behind the wheel of a moving vehicle and freaked out.

    I don’t see a problem with what I did.  Had we been able to take the experience further, and he bumped into something, I was fully prepared to deal with any resultant damage, but at 2 - 3 mph I wasn’t expecting any.  In exchange for that “risk” I got to share a moment that the father may remember for the rest of his life.

    So, based on the above, do I lack “common sense”?

    To me, over reacting to what you did is lacking in common sense..  Nobody got hurt, and you got to share a moment, for practically no risk.

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  • Posted: 08 June 2012 09:34 AM #12

    “Common sense” can be understood in a technical sense (you knew what you were doing) or in a social sense (the wisdom at doing it right there, in that context, with those onlookers).

         
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    Posted: 08 June 2012 09:42 AM #13

    This would make a terrific short story. F. Scott Fitzgerald would have loved it. Had Hemingway written it, you would have handed him the wheel at 60 mph. Raymond Carver wrote a story about a blind man in a similar tone, titled “Cathedral.” What makes this a rich story is that the crowd (public opinion) soured a deep personal experience for both you and the blind man.

    Last week I put my toddler son on my lap and let him back my car down the driveway and then “drive” it forward to park on our dead-end street. I’m sure this violated all kinds of traffic laws. I’m sure some would think me crazy for doing this. But one of my favorite memories is sitting on my grandfather’s lap while we drove his International Harvester pick up truck through his fields.

    When does preoccupation with safety prevent us from living our lives?

         
  • Posted: 10 June 2012 08:06 PM #14

    stkstalker - 08 June 2012 03:53 AM

    If the point is about the joy for the father of the groom, my answer is no. It was a nice gesture.

    If the point is about your relationship with your gf, my answer is yes. Just start the grovelling now and it will be over sooner.

    I think this pretty much sums up my thinking too.

    If you’re talking just between us guys, then yeah, you did just fine. In fact, it was a great thing that you did.

    But if you think for even one second that you’re going to somehow out logic or out argue your girlfriend, then you are out of your cotton picking mind.

         
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    Posted: 10 June 2012 08:45 PM #15

    Prazan - 08 June 2012 12:42 PM

    This would make a terrific short story. F. Scott Fitzgerald would have loved it. Had Hemingway written it, you would have handed him the wheel at 60 mph. Raymond Carver wrote a story about a blind man in a similar tone, titled “Cathedral.” What makes this a rich story is that the crowd (public opinion) soured a deep personal experience for both you and the blind man.

    Last week I put my toddler son on my lap and let him back my car down the driveway and then “drive” it forward to park on our dead-end street. I’m sure this violated all kinds of traffic laws. I’m sure some would think me crazy for doing this. But one of my favorite memories is sitting on my grandfather’s lap while we drove his International Harvester pick up truck through his fields.

    When does preoccupation with safety prevent us from living our lives?

    Your toddler son can’t reach the pedals, much less do lock-to-lock heroics.  It’d take a pretty hysterical neighbor to turn you in.  I can’t speak for what the average cop would do.

    (Of course once you’re out of your driveway/quiet home street, anything goes.)

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