An Article by FalKirk on Tech.Pinions

  • Posted: 18 June 2012 01:43 PM

    I was invited to write an article for Tech.Pinions. It’s posted here:

    The Terrible Tablet Tsunami and the Future of Computing

    If you’d care to, I’d greatly it if you’d read the article and leave any constructive comments you may have on the Tech.Pinions site. You can leave your “destructive” comments here. smile

         
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    Posted: 18 June 2012 02:14 PM #1

    There are entire continents where recent tech has not made a big dent.

    One wonders who will make the inroads there.

    For Google or Microsoft to succeed in mobile, they need to change their DNA.  Stop striking out.  Fight for every customer with secure and attractive features, not bribe them. 

    In practicality, Google might be forced to change its DNA faster than Microsoft.    Google probably has the more flexible corporate staff.  Microsoft has Ballmer.

         
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    Posted: 18 June 2012 05:31 PM #2

    Dang, John! When I read that article earlier today I thought it was written by one of the Bajarins. I was going to link to the article on one of the threads here, but didn’t have time. Great job!!!

         
  • Posted: 18 June 2012 07:19 PM #3

    Drew Bear - 18 June 2012 08:31 PM

    Dang, John! When I read that article earlier today I thought it was written by one of the Bajarins. I was going to link to the article on one of the threads here, but didn’t have time. Great job!!!

    Thank you so much.

    They’ve asked me to write an article every other week - opposite Jim Dalrymple, if you can believe it - and to perhaps fill-in occasionally when other writers are absent.

    The only major feedback they gave me on my first article was…to be MORE opinionated! Wow, you don’t have to ask me twice to do that. If they want opinionated, I can give them opinionated.

    If you (or any of you reading this) have any feedback on the article, either positive or negative, please post it there. I’d like to see the an active discussion in the comments section.

         
  • Posted: 18 June 2012 09:06 PM #4

    Very well done.  I like how you organized your thoughts first, and only then expressed them.

    Opinions might sell newspapers, but they don’t always make good analysis.  I think your balance here is good, especially as an inaugural piece.

    One aspect that you might have given some space to is the difference of opinion between Cook/Apple and Balmer/Microsoft on whether the PC and the tablet are hired for different jobs (Cook) or the same job (Balmer).  Maybe you could do a follow-up on that.

    Nice job.

         
  • Posted: 18 June 2012 09:14 PM #5

    capablanca - 19 June 2012 12:06 AM

    One aspect that you might have given some space to is the difference of opinion between Cook/Apple and Balmer/Microsoft on whether the PC and the tablet are hired for different jobs (Cook) or the same job (Balmer).  Maybe you could do a follow-up on that.

    Great suggestion. I actually had several things in mind when I started the piece. I was going to talk about “jobs to be done” and whether the tablet was a PC and whether it did “real” work and a couple of other things too. As I wrote I was unable to weave those things in without making the article longer and longer and less and less coherent. Finally, the article kept getting simpler and simpler and simpler until it came down to a single point.

    But I’d still like to return to those other themes at another time and your suggestion is definitely at the top of my list.

    Your suggestion and your feedback are very much appreciated.

         
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    Posted: 18 June 2012 09:26 PM #6

    Just commented on the article, with some potential future topics for related discussion.

    FalKirk - 18 June 2012 10:19 PM

    If they want opinionated, I can give them opinionated.

    LOL! Can’t wait for that…

    On the other hand, Capa has a point about balance. I liked it the way it was.

    [ Edited: 18 June 2012 09:32 PM by Roman ]      
  • Posted: 18 June 2012 09:53 PM #7

    Excellent.

    An article about the value of the ecosystem was overdue.  Google and Microsoft have different challenges, but they share one key weakness:  They do not have anywhere near the experience of Apple in building state-of-the-art hardware.

         
  • Posted: 19 June 2012 05:18 PM #8

    One could also bring up the strength of Microsoft’s XBox 360, which will have consumer overlap. I can’t gauge how well Apple’s gaming stands up. Very well, I think. XBox well?

    If platforms are sticky (and I agree they are) then Microsoft continues to have the huge advantages of Windows (desktop) and Office. Google and Apple are mostly nowhere against Office. How well can Microsoft project those influences into the phone & tablet spaces? It seems to me that phones are too distant from desktop Windows and Office to matter (see Windows Phone, which aimed to be like Windows desktop, and failed). Tablets might be within range and Metro will be their user experience that ties the platforms together.

         
  • Posted: 19 June 2012 07:04 PM #9

    Graham Perks - 19 June 2012 08:18 PM

    If platforms are sticky (and I agree they are) then Microsoft continues to have the huge advantages of Windows (desktop) and Office.

    Agreed. This was why everyone felt that Microsoft was invulnerable. They had a monopoly on the only platform that mattered.

    Apple snookered them by finding a device (the tablet) that required a totally different user input and a totally different user operating system that was totally different from that of the desktop. Then they popularized it.

    Now Microsoft is the King Kong of an ever shrinking island of desktops.

    Graham Perks - 19 June 2012 08:18 PM

    Google and Apple are mostly nowhere against Office.

    And they never will be. But Office is a nothing in mobile.

    Graham Perks - 19 June 2012 08:18 PM

    How well can Microsoft project those influences into the phone & tablet spaces? It seems to me that phones are too distant from desktop Windows and Office to matter (see Windows Phone, which aimed to be like Windows desktop, and failed). Tablets might be within range and Metro will be their user experience that ties the platforms together.

    This is the hundred thousand dollar question. Can Office extend its dominance down into tablets? Not likely.

    - And program created for a tablet will be wholly different than it’s desktop counterparts.

    - Office programs are large and complex. Tablets favor small, simple and single-purpose Applications.

    - Office will have no monopoly advantages on tablets. They will have to compete head-to-head with every other software alternative available. Are they really that good? Or where they just being buoyed by their monopoly status? We’ll soon know.

         
  • Posted: 20 June 2012 01:58 AM #10

    I don’t think Office will make a big difference.

    iWork has been available on the iPad for ages. While it sells well, I never use it, nor do I know anybody who does. They form factor is simply not suitable for heavy duty document work. Note taking and as an organizer…

         
  • Posted: 20 June 2012 02:20 AM #11

    dduck - 20 June 2012 04:58 AM

    I don’t think Office will make a big difference.

    iWork has been available on the iPad for ages. While it sells well, I never use it, nor do I know anybody who does. They form factor is simply not suitable for heavy duty document work. Note taking and as an organizer…

    Agreed. I think there are going to be a lot of shocked (and disappointed?) people when Office finally gets ported to tablets. It’s not the ultimate weapon that everyone (including Microsoft?) thinks it is.

         
  • Posted: 20 June 2012 12:21 PM #12

    While agreeing with the Office comments herein, I’ll just observe that the big advantage with Office was never its superiority.  It was its ubiquity, which grew into familiarity.  Everyone from the PC era knows how to use Office. 

    Unfortunately for MS, everyone knows how to use an iPad are iPads are not used for writing letters and grinding out spreadsheets.  And a corollary to this is that not everyone in the Post-PC era knows how to use Office.  Take the average 1st-grader for example.

         
  • Posted: 20 June 2012 01:20 PM #13

    I’m not planning on using AFB as my publicist, but - one last time - I’d like to note that I have had another article accepted by Tech.Pinions. Not only that, but MacNewsDaily (MDN) has picked it up and “recommended” it.

    How very cool.

    Any comments, both good and bad, from this august body would be welcomed. You can find the article here:

    The Apple iPad Tablet vs. the Microsoft Surface Anti-Tablet

         
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    Posted: 20 June 2012 02:50 PM #14

    Nice job.  I like how you used the SJ quotes to reinforce Apple’s point of view.

    Signature

    Tim Cook: iPad is 91% of all tablet web traffic. I don’t know what these other tablets are doing.

         
  • Posted: 20 June 2012 03:04 PM #15

    afterglow - 20 June 2012 05:50 PM

    Nice job.  I like how you used the SJ quotes to reinforce Apple’s point of view.

    Thank you. Much appreciated.