The Omnibus AFB Surface Topic

  • Posted: 29 June 2012 02:29 PM #301

    I find it interesting that Google says they began work on the Nexus tablet in January, and they will ship it in mid July at a price of $199.

    On the other hand, Microsoft has been working on Windows 8 RT for at least a year, have pre-announced a device called Surface that is neither a tablet or a laptop (or maybe both, they’re not sure), and they have not provided a firm price or shipping date.

    Now a few questions:

    1) If you are an Android device maker, how do you compete with a (subsidized?) tablet from Google?

    2) If you are a Microsoft partner, who is the greater evil: Microsoft or Google? Do you become an Android device maker, continue to work with Microsoft, or just choose not to play in the tablet space?

    3) If you are Apple, do you make a 7” iPod touch and position it as a premium device in a new segment?

         
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    Posted: 01 July 2012 03:49 PM #302

    Microsoft…tried in 2002 (Tablet PC), then 2006 (UMPC Platform), then 2010 (Slate), now 2012 (Surface).  See the latter part of this article regarding prior MSFT’s failed attempts to penetrate this market.  Product availability for this target market has changed dramatically since the introduction of the iPad.  If Softies pre-Surface products did not make a dent when there was no existing successful product for this market, Monkey-boy Balmer will have his hands full pulling this proverbial rabbit out of the hat…

    http://blogs.marketwatch.com/cody/2012/07/01/here-comes-the-apple-breakout/

         
  • Posted: 01 July 2012 06:44 PM #303

    I find it interesting that Google says they began work on the Nexus tablet in January, and they will ship it in mid July at a price of $199.

    Acer had tablet hardware ready that they pulled when Google asked if they wanted to go legit with the Nexus 7.

    On the other hand, Microsoft has been working on Windows 8 RT for at least a year, have pre-announced a device called Surface that is neither a tablet or a laptop (or maybe both, they?re not sure), and they have not provided a firm price or shipping date.

    Remember that the OS in Google’s case was ready to go just few of their OEMs could follow through and deliver a compelling tablet. Microsoft have been working on Windows 8 ARM for quiet a while now.

    An aside, pretty certain when Apple announced it’s switch to Intel it was pretty much ready to go. Windows 8 has been kicking around for a while in various states of vapor and then various betas both public and private.

    1) If you are an Android device maker, how do you compete with a (subsidized?) tablet from Google?

    Should be interesting to see what Amazon does. Everyone else appears to have had the low price tablet market knocked from under them.

    2) If you are a Microsoft partner, who is the greater evil: Microsoft or Google? Do you become an Android device maker, continue to work with Microsoft, or just choose not to play in the tablet space?

    Once bitten twice shy. I think most of the OEMs are holding back to see what the tablet market is. If it is an iPad market with some stragglers then there is not much they can do.

    3) If you are Apple, do you make a 7? iPod touch and position it as a premium device in a new segment?

    I think that is the only way Apple would make a 7” tablet. I don’t think they will try and compete with the iPad competitors as that would look desperate. But upscaling the iPod Touch seems like a great idea. Semantics, indeed.

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    Posted: 03 July 2012 03:41 PM #304

    Microsoft still doesn’t get it. Gates last night on Charlie Rose:

    “You can get everything you like about a tablet, everything you like a PC, all in one device. That should change the way people look at things.”

    http://www.businessinsider.com/bill-gates-microsoft-surface-2012-7?op=1

         
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    Posted: 03 July 2012 03:51 PM #305

    No, Gates is right!

    People will look at things more quizzically and skeptically.

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  • Posted: 03 July 2012 04:22 PM #306

    Drew Bear - 03 July 2012 06:41 PM

    Microsoft still doesn’t get it. Gates last night on Charlie Rose:

    “You can get everything you like about a tablet, everything you like a PC, all in one device. That should change the way people look at things.”

    http://www.businessinsider.com/bill-gates-microsoft-surface-2012-7?op=1

    Interesting. I agree with you that Gates doesn’t get it. But when I read your post, I was sure that you were going to link to this:

    Bill Gates: Here’s Why The iPad Was A Success And Microsoft’s Original Vision Fell Short

    I genuinely respect Bill Gates. But either he’s being disingenuous or there’s a lot of stuff - important computer related stuff - that he genuinely doesn’t get.

         
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    Posted: 03 July 2012 04:49 PM #307

    FalKirk - 03 July 2012 07:22 PM

    Interesting. I agree with you that Gates doesn’t get it. But when I read your post, I was sure that you were going to link to this:

    Bill Gates: Here’s Why The iPad Was A Success And Microsoft’s Original Vision Fell Short

    I genuinely respect Bill Gates. But either he’s being disingenuous or there’s a lot of stuff - important computer related stuff - that he genuinely doesn’t get.

    If I may quote from your response to that article:

    Bill Gates seems determined not to mention the one thing that matters. THE key to the tablet is using the finger instead of the mouse of the stylus. The finger…

    And now from this Vanity Fair article Red posted the link to in the Intraday:

    ... Microsoft had a prototype e-reader ready to go in 1998, but when the technology group presented it to Bill Gates he promptly gave it a thumbs-down, saying it wasn?t right for Microsoft. ?He didn?t like the user interface, because it didn?t look like Windows,? a programmer involved in the project recalls.

    ?The group working on the initiative was removed from a reporting line to Gates? ... ?We couldn?t be focused anymore on developing technology that was effective for consumers?
    ...
    The real problem for his colleagues was the touch screen: ?Office is designed to inputting with a keyboard, not a stylus or a finger,? the official says. ?There were all kinds of personal prejudices at work.? According to Microsoft executives, the company?s loyalty to Windows and Office repeatedly kept them from jumping on emerging technologies. ?Windows was the god?everything had to work with Windows,? Stone tells Eichenwald. ?Ideas about mobile computing with a user experience that was cleaner than with a P.C. were deemed unimportant by a few powerful people in that division, and they managed to kill the effort.?

    Bill Gates gave the finger to using the finger. See also: from A Christmas Story.

    [ Edited: 03 July 2012 04:54 PM by Apple II+ ]

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  • Posted: 03 July 2012 05:14 PM #308

    Apple II+ - 03 July 2012 07:49 PM

    And now from this Vanity Fair article Red posted the link to in the Intraday:

    ... Microsoft had a prototype e-reader ready to go in 1998, but when the technology group presented it to Bill Gates he promptly gave it a thumbs-down, saying it wasn?t right for Microsoft. ?He didn?t like the user interface, because it didn?t look like Windows,? a programmer involved in the project recalls.

    ?The group working on the initiative was removed from a reporting line to Gates? ... ?We couldn?t be focused anymore on developing technology that was effective for consumers?
    ...
    The real problem for his colleagues was the touch screen: ?Office is designed to inputting with a keyboard, not a stylus or a finger,? the official says. ?There were all kinds of personal prejudices at work.? According to Microsoft executives, the company?s loyalty to Windows and Office repeatedly kept them from jumping on emerging technologies. ?Windows was the god?everything had to work with Windows,? Stone tells Eichenwald. ?Ideas about mobile computing with a user experience that was cleaner than with a P.C. were deemed unimportant by a few powerful people in that division, and they managed to kill the effort.?

    Bill Gates gave the finger to using the finger. See also: from A Christmas Story.

    That about says it all. If it wasn’t Windows, it didn’t pass the litmus test.

    I think the leap to touch was genius on Jobs part. But maybe I’m wrong. Maybe Microsoft could have done it and done it easily if that whole area of exploration hadn’t been blocked by Microsoft’s obsession with “Windows everywhere”.

    By the way, very nice post.

         
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    Posted: 03 July 2012 05:37 PM #309

    Microsoft was unwilling to risk their cash cows, with a new paradigm.  Apple under Jobs seemed to thrive under the pirate flag.  Apple has never been fearful of killing off old ideas which have served their purpose.  This is one of their most distinct traits.  Few large Corps are willing to risk their cash cows on the hope for the next big thing.  Hopefully Apple has truly internalized this behavior as it is neither easy nor to senior management appears logical, but for Apple it works.  Most companies use a toe in the water approach.  Look at Google, they build a world class OS that contributes pennies to the bottom line.  They took a low risk approach, relying on others to deliver the experience.  Just this year they bought a hardware company, Why?  Microsoft a software provider for the PC industry is suddenly a hardware guy delivering the next big thing.  It won’t happen, because their heart is not really behind the effort IMO.  What cash cow did they risk in the surface effort.  The attitude is don’t hurt Windows or Office, but if we can come up with a device for our Window’s and Office folk and can keep our monopoly then everyone is happy.  The problem is everyone is not happy and corporations are voting with their wallet and buying iPads at a blistering pace.  Apple is the new safe choice in tablet computers and Microsoft is comfortable trying to move folks to Windows for tablet.

         
  • Posted: 03 July 2012 06:27 PM #310

    pats - 03 July 2012 08:37 PM

    Microsoft was unwilling to risk their cash cows, with a new paradigm.  Apple under Jobs seemed to thrive under the pirate flag.  Apple has never been fearful of killing off old ideas which have served their purpose.  This is one of their most distinct traits.

    Agree. In today’s terminology, Apple disrupts itself. I don’t have a comprehensive grasp of the history of business, but from my limited perspective, I think this is rare beyond belief. And, as you pointed out, not only did Job allow this kind of disruption, he seemed to thrive on it.

    The man was chock full of amazing traits but I’m not sure if there was any trait rarer than this one.

         
  • Posted: 23 August 2012 09:15 AM #311

    Remember all the Windows 8 and Surface buzz?  I had to turn four pages to unbury this thread on which to post this image that’s worth a lowbrow giggle. 

         
  • Posted: 23 August 2012 10:31 PM #312

    Here’s another “Windows 8 is a tax on my brain” review.  In fact, the reviewer is uninstalling it.

    http://www.pcgamesn.com/article/why-i-m-uninstalling-windows-8

         
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    Posted: 23 August 2012 10:37 PM #313

    Mercel - 24 August 2012 01:31 AM

    Here’s another “Windows 8 is a tax on my brain” review.  In fact, the reviewer is uninstalling it.

    http://www.pcgamesn.com/article/why-i-m-uninstalling-windows-8

    Microsoft roulette:  Design Windows 8 so bad that 20 % of employees resign to move to greener pastures or are fired.  Most of the remainder take a pay cut but they still have a job for Windows 8.1 and 9.0.

         
  • Posted: 23 August 2012 11:58 PM #314

    Mercel - 24 August 2012 01:31 AM

    Here’s another “Windows 8 is a tax on my brain” review.  In fact, the reviewer is uninstalling it.

    http://www.pcgamesn.com/article/why-i-m-uninstalling-windows-8

    Long before Windows 8 was announced, I argued right here on the AFB that Microsoft was screwed. My argument was that all of Microsoft’s users were on the desktop, the desktop works best with a mouse and that Microsoft was caught on the horns of a dilemma. If they made their next OS touch-like, they wold leave their current OS behind and if they didn’t make their new OS touch-like, it wouldn’t work on tablets.

    What I didn’t know what that Microsoft was going to come out with two operating systems and pretend that they were all Windows and all the same. What they ended up with is:

    - A desktop OS that’s that’s ruined because it contains elements of tablet OS;

    - A desktop OS that they’re pawning off as a tablet OS so long as you add a keyboard and a mouse and turn your tablet back into a desktop; and

    - A totally separate OS that that’s designed for a tablet and that you’re pretending is windows even though its totally incompatible with all Windows applications.

    Windows 8 is going to be adopted because its the main OS for Windows compatible desktop computers. But it sounds like the adoption is going to be slow. There will be a lot of resistance from business and perhaps from consumers as well.

    Windows RT is in trouble. First, it has no Apps. Second, it competes directly with the iPad. Head to head, it won’t fare well.

    Windows 8 professional is the intriguing product. The Windows advocates think that it’s going to be the best of both worlds. The doubters call it Doctor Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - it has two totally different operating systems and two totally different personalities.

    The article, above, focuses on the desktop version of Windows. But I think that Windows 8 professional is where things are going to go terribly wrong. Talk about a tax on your brain. Two operating systems in one enclosure sounds great but it actually leads to cognitive fatigue. Your brain is constantly confused and can never assign background functions to muscle memory.

    Watch for huge initial sales and then a huge backlash. Since Windows is still huge in desktops, many assume that Windows will dominate tablets too. In reality, Windows is rapidly becoming a minority player. Android has passed it and iOS is on track to do so by the end of the year. The center of computing gravity has already shifted from desktop to mobile although few have recognized it yet. People need desktop computers that work with their phones and tablets, not the other way around.

    Finally, why on earth do we think that Windows tablets will do well? Windows Phone 7 got no traction at all. What makes Windows tablets so very different? The touch version has no apps. And the professional version is really just a thinly disguised notebook. Hybrids are useful, but they seldom go mainstream.

    What fascinating times we live in. I truly believe that this might be the end for Microsoft’s Personal Computing ambitions. If they’re locked out of tablets the way they’ve been locked out of phones, then they’re locked out of the future of personal computing. Time, as always, will tell. And Microsoft’s time may be running out.

         
  • Posted: 24 August 2012 12:59 AM #315

    I’m in enterprise, and I have made it a point to ask everyone I come in contact if they have any plans to adopt Windows 8.  Like a good attorney, I knew that answer before I asked the question. 

    NO! 

    Business software’s main purpose is to enable, and hopefully improve on employee productivity.  In all the reviews I’ve read, I haven’t seen any compelling evidence Windows 8 facilitates that.  Quite the contrary, Windows 8 will likely impede productivity.  Too different, too clumsy and too unnecessary.

    Remember the Dvorak keyboard?  WIth the best of intentions (and some science behind it), the keys were laid out in a more optimized arrangement.  But guess what, those pesky humans turn out to be…wait for it…creatures of habit.  The Dvorak fell flat and no one talks about attempting migrating away from a QWERTY keyboard anymore.

    Windows 8 is likely the next Dvorak keyboard in OS terms.