We Already Know a Lot About Apple’s September 12 Event, and Apple Likes That

4 minute read
| Particle Debris

There was a time when Apple, especially Steve Jobs, would spring a surprise on us at an event, and we were delighted. Times are too complex for that now.

2018 iPhone mockups

Intentional leaks help us size up the 2018 iPhones.

The Particle Debris article of the week is from engadget.

I cite that article not for its drama, depth of analysis, or excellence in tech writing, although it’s an excellent, comprehensive article. No, I point to it because it nicely encapsulates everything we think we know about what Apple will present during its September 12th event.

And that’s fairly amazing at this point.

Of course, this article could be wrong in places. We’re never absolutely sure in advance what Apple will roll out. Plus, the Apple echo chamber can create artificial supporting evidence. Even so, over time, multiple, credible sources start to paint a picture that stitches together a reasonable new product story.

How Does Apple Feel About Leaks?

My theory about this annual oozing of intel into the Apple community is that it is intentional. The reason is that the pace of life no longer allows customers to watch a two hour event, digest the implications, mentally integrate the new products into their lives (and finances), and then rush into an online purchase in the middle of the night.

Instead, Apple warms us up by degrees. We start to get our heads around all the new products for weeks in advance. Piecemeal, we come to understand why we may wish to spring for one of the new iPhones. Or Apple Watch. Or iPad (Pro).

This process effectively primes the pump of our imagination, informs us, and brings us around to a tentative purchase decision.  When the event actually takes place, we hear the news, and we’re full of confidence. Then we can “favorite” our choice in the online store so we’re ready on order day. It’s a process.

This serves also to ensure dramatic, initial demand for all the new products. There’s nothing like finding out that everyone else is eagerly informed and on the bandwagon to make us technically insecure and then spur us into action.

This is why I believe Apple leaks the juiciest details early. It’s the modern, Tim Cook approach for modern, hectic times.

Next Page: The News Debris for the week of August 27th. Tech, AI, human irrelevance and tyranny.

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aardmanOld UNIX GuyLee Dronickwab95John Martellaro Recent comment authors

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aardman
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aardman

So many things to say in response to Yuval Harari’s referenced article. I’ll just ramble around about in a somewhat haphazard hit-or-miss rumination… 1. Other than attention-grabbing pronouncements of Ray Kurzweil and his brethren, no one has really proved the inevitability of the Singularity, capital S –the day when machine intelligence supplants human intelligence, rendering the latter redundant, sub-optimal, and dispensable. Most of the writing and commentary I’ve read about AI falls into two categories. One that says AI can never achieve human-like intelligence for a host of reasons of which the one I think is most critical is that… Read more »

Old UNIX Guy
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Old UNIX Guy

I don’t think the leaks were intentional at all. An intentional leak from Apple is a “yep” or a “nope” from Jim Dalyrmple. The leaked photos of the new iPhones and Apple Watch smack of a tired, overworked Apple employee screwing up.

Old UNIX Guy

Lee Dronick
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Lee Dronick
wab95
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wab95

John: Where to begin? Yes, I’m talking about Yuval Harari’s piece in The Atlantic. While I disagree with Harari’s analysis of humankind, whether in ‘Sapiens’, ‘Homo Deus’ or ’21 Lessons’, one virtue of his writings is his intellectual honesty in pointing out both speculation on his part, as well as examples from history that contradict his generally dire predictions. For example, in his Atlantic piece, he writes, “Fears of machines pushing people out of the job market are, of course, nothing new, and in the past such fears proved to be unfounded”. However, he goes on to opine, “But artificial… Read more »

Ned
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Ned

Didn’t Ebenezer/Tim release a policy recently about leaking information suggesting legal action? But it’s okay if he wants to drive the Hype Engine. Reminds me of revised rule Number 7: “All animals are equal but some are more equal than others.”

palmac
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palmac

liberalism has begun to lose credibility. Questions about the ability of liberal democracy to provide for the middle class have grown louder;

Before making a statement like this, it would be prudent for the author to look into this little thing we have called “History.” When liberal democracy is strong the middle class thrives.

geoduck
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geoduck

Agreed, however when the middle class isn’t thriving for other reasons, they turn away from liberal democracy. It’s a weird conundrum, people turn away from their best hope and embracing the worst option, but it’s happened before in a lot of countries. Some self destructive twist in human nature somehow.