Forum

DATA dilemma  

  RSS

0

Hello I am currently geting rid of all files on my mac book pro 13 (mid2012). I have two drives one that is original and anothe SSD intel 535. Notice that I am not a computer geek. Once I went to repair my keyabord and guy that works their said that my operating system is not on the right hard (and that it makes my mac working slower) but I forgot what exactly he said. Now I am wondering how do I know on what hard drive my operating system is? I have my programmes on 500Gb SATA disk. 

Screen Shot 2018 11 06 at 22.24.33

Overall my question is what is a proper way to store applications and OS on your mac book. I would appreciate any advice. 

This topic was modified 1 week  ago by Ekaterina Karandash
 
0

If your OS is on the 500GB, it would be ideal to transfer it to the SSD, the 120GB drive. How you do that is a bit involved if you don't know what you're doing. Maybe you could ask the same people who worked on your computer if they could do it for you?

I had to log in using different account. thanks for you answer.

basically I would like to know things myself so I do not have to pay to get check outs and live in ignorance. many of Mac issues are as simple as follow certain steps in manual.  

0

A couple of ways to confirm which is your startup disk:

  1. Click on the Apple icon at top left of the screen then choose "About this Mac". The window that pops up will tell you the name of your startup disk.
  2. Open System Preferences then choose the Startup Disk icon which will then display a window showing which disk is the chosen startup disk (and potentially let you choose another).

If you have two drives in the MacBook Pro it would seem to indicate that somebody has replaced the original DVD drive with a hard drive connector and installed an SSD. Presumably the idea should have been to place the operating system on the SSD (which runs much faster) as Jeff has noted.

I had to log in with a different name.

Thanks for the answer. As I reinstalled my OS to Mojave it clearly shows that my startup disk is my SSD. Now I am clear with that. Would you also answer which disk is better to instal my general applications. In my case that would be Maya and Adobe programmes? 

 

kind

0

Hello Ekaterina

On your configuration I would use the faster SSD for my apps because they will load much faster and make the system feel snappy as a result.

If I understand your current setup, you have the OS installed on the SSD which means that when you install apps they will generally install themselves into the Applications folder which is also in your SSD drive so your apps should already install themselves in the Applications folder, which again, is to be found in your SSD.

SSD drives have no moving parts and are therefore very fast while the traditional drives, like your 500GB drive are general a few magnitude of order slower because they are mechanical and unable to transfer (read/write) data as quickly.

Personally I use my SSD for the OS and consequentially for Application installs. As a result the OS and applications both load quickly. I store my documents on a slower mechanical drive (like your 500GB) drive. This was a deliberate choice for me because of economics. SSD drives are relatively expensive relative to their storage capacity while benefiting from blazing speeds. Mechanical drives are the opposite, slower, larger capacities, and less expensive.

To test things, install your Adobe Suite. After the install you should notice it is installed in your Applications folder which is in your SSD drive.

Hope this helps you become a little geekier but to be honest, someone who operates the Adobe apps is probably someone who is quite pro already.

Cheers!
—Alex

I have to desagree with your last statement Alex, not every Adobe Suite user are mac or computer experts. I have a couple of designer I work with that only use those apps and that's it. I just mention SSD to them and they have that look in their eyes, you know, the totally lost look;-) Anyway, not that it's the case of the OP though:-)

Share: