Apple's Advanced Technology Group Changed the World

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In another good article by FastCoDesign, Jesus Diaz writes how Apple’s research group developed some of the most highly influential tech of the century. For example, a feature coming in macOS Mojave called Stacks automatically categorizes your files on the desktop. But Stacks isn’t a new technology, and evolved out of concepts that ATG worked on.

The ATG was founded in 1986 by Larry Tesler, a computer scientist who had previously worked at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center–aka PARC, the birthplace of the graphic user interface–before moving to Apple. The group’s mission was to create breakthrough technologies that didn’t need to be products.

Though they were introduced onstage at WWDC as “Stacks,” they were once known as “Piles.” It extended the desktop metaphor even further by allowing users to organize their files in stacks of papers, images, or videos, leaving folders for more permanent archival purposes–just like real life.

Apple Could Be Collateral Damage in the U.S. Trade War

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President Trump has effectively started a trade war with China—as well as other countries—by imposing tariffs on metal imports from Europe, Canada, and Mexico. These countries are fighting the U.S. trade war, with China focusing on American-made goods like beef, poultry, tobacco, and cars.

Tim Cook worries that Apple could be collateral damage. Last month he visited the White House to warn the president that Apple’s position in China could be threatened by tough measures coming out of the U.S. The New York Times notes:

In a trade and technology showdown between the United States and China, Apple and Mr. Cook have a lot to lose. With 41 stores and hundreds of millions of iPhones sold in the country, there is arguably no American company in China as successful, as high-profile and with as big a target on its back.

Here's What Your City Looked Like up to 750 Million Years Ago

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FastCoDesign shared an interesting visual tool that shows what your city looked like up to 750 million years ago. It’s called Ancient Earth. You enter your address, click on the menu to pick the age, then it instantly shows how the land mass looked.

Earth was a completely different planet 240 million years ago. Back then we had Pangea, a mashup of a supercontinent formed by older continental units and surrounded by water. Then, around 175 million years ago, magma pushed this landmass’s tectonic plates in different directions, slowly forming the continents we know today.

Fun fact: Mar-a-Lago has always been a swamp–and L.A. traffic has always been crap. True story, folks.

CleanEmail 1-Year Subscription: $19.99

· · TMO Deals

CleanEmail Window

We have a deal on a 1-year subscription to CleanEmail. It’s a rules and filter-based email management tool, and the subscription covers up to five email accounts. It works from both a browser and email clients, and encrypts access details and removes data after 24 hours so that CleanEmail never retains access to your information. 1 year is $19.99 through us.

Apple Camp 2018: Robots, Music, and Video

· · Cool Stuff Found

If you’re a kid between 8 and 12 years old, it’s time to sign up for Apple Camp. This year’s programs include Coding with Sphero Robots, Beat Making and Songwriting with GarageBand, and Telling Stories with Clips. The programs are hosted at local Apple stores and are 90 minutes a day for three days throughout July. The programs are all free and they fill up fast so be sure to sign up right away. You can check out the program descriptions and sign up at the Apple Camp website.

Apple Camp 2018: Robots, Music, and Video

Check Out How Much Apple Sells Every Second

· · Cool Stuff Found

Curious how many iPhones Apple sells every second? How about iPads or Macs? Or how much revenue the company brings in every second? You can see that, and a lot more about the company’s per-second activity at Every Second. The website lists those stats, along with profit, app and song downloads, iMessages sent, FaceTime calls, and more. You can check out all the numbers and watch then continue to count up at the Every Second website. It’s mesmerizing.

Check Out How Much Apple Sells Every Second

Ten One Design Intros Light-up Stella MacBook Charger Cord

· · Cool Stuff Found

Ten One Designs introduced its Stella replacement power cord for MacBook and MacBook Pro chargers on Tuesday. The cord is wrapped in braided fabric, and the plug-end lights up when it’s near a power outlet. It also has a built-in clip so you can wrap the cord around your charger brick. The cable is white and you can choose between aqua and blue for the plug head. The design makes it easy to see outlets in the dark and lets you know if they have power, too. Stella is priced at US$34.95 and it ships in July.

Ten One Design Intros Light-up Stella MacBook Charger Cord

macOS Mojave: the Complete Reference

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macOS Mojave

Particle Debris page 2 highlights two articles that provide a detailed review of macOS Mojave features. Afterwards, it’ll be clear that Apple has done an amazing job with this new version of macOS. I call it the “wow-factor.”

Mac App Switcher, iOS Reminders, iPad Calculator, and Feedbag? – Mac Geek Gab 714

· & · Mac Geek Gab Podcast

The MGG Feedbag!

Do you like Quick Tips? Do you think you know everything about the macOS App Switcher? If you answered “yes” to those questions we think you’ll be in for a very pleasant surprise, and that’s just the kickoff of the episode! Then it’s on to a few other tips, including a great script for unmounting drives that contain iTunes libraries. Plus, your questions answered. Download or simply press play, and enjoy!

TMO Background Mode Interview with Georgia Tech Roboticist Dr. Ayanna Howard

· · Background Mode Podcast

Dr. Ayanna Howard is a professor of Interactive Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology. She’s also in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Ayanna received her Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Southern California. I asked Ayanna how she became inspired by robot technology. Like many of us, it was via science fiction on TV. In graduate school, robotics was still immature, so she wisely elected to pursue electrical engineering. Her first job was at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) working on vision, fuzzy logic, and neural network methodologies. Today, she leads her students in the areas of assistive robots in the home, therapy gaming apps and remote robotic exploration of extreme environments. Our discussion covered the whole field of robotics, so tune in and hear all about the state-of-the-art from an accomplished roboticist.