Artist Uses iPhone ARKit to Visualize Sound in 3D Space

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Zach Lieberman is an artist who is exploring how to create art using iPhone ARKit. His latest creation? Recording audio in space. In the demo video, Zach makes sounds like “woosh, psh, ah, click.” After each sound, a white blob bursts into the air, and as Zach walks backward, each blob is linked to the other blobs like a audio timeline. When he walks forward again through the trail, you hear each sound playing in reverse. Zach, who helps run the School For Poetic Computation in New York City, built the demo using Simultaneous Localization And Mapping (SLAM). It uses the iPhone’s sensors and camera to create a low-res map of the room. The app records sound with the microphone, processes and visualizes it, and then maps each sound blob to a location within the room.

Quick test recording audio in space and playing back -- (video has audio !) #openframeworks

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Shopping For Mother’s Day? Consider Digital Art Decoration

· · Product News

Display digital art and hang Meural on the wall

Looking for a Mother’s Day present? Andrew Orr found a new type of digital art decoration on the market called Meural Canvas. It’s a 27-inch screen you hang on your wall, and change the art it shows using your smartphone. You can upload your own photos to the display, and the company partners with a bunch of big-name art museums. You can choose over 30,000 paintings from Meural’s app and website.

Digital Ethereal: Turning Wi-Fi Signals into Art

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Art is all around us and can show up in the most amazing places, including the electromagnetic fields from our smartphones. Luis Hernan used that idea to turn Wi-Fi signals from smartphones into light painting, and it’s awesome to see. He uses a Kirlian Device to track Wi-Fi signal strength and long exposure photography to capture his images which look like colorful webs of light spun into everyday scenes. You can check out his beautiful work at the Digital Ethereal website.

Digital Ethereal: Turning Wi-Fi Signals into Art