Libraries Work to Scan Public Domain Books

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Right now, books published in the U.S. before 1924 are in the public domain. This means they are publicly owned and everyone can use and copy them. But there’s a loophole in copyright law which gives up to 75% of books published between 1923 and 1964 secret public domain status. It’s hard to figure out which ones they are, so a group of libraries, archivists, and volunteers are finding these public domain books, scanning them, and uploading them to the internet.

Richardson notes that much of that heavy lifting is being done by volunteers at organizations like Project Gutenberg, a nonprofit effort to digitize and archive cultural works. These volunteers are tasked with locating a copy of the book in question, scanning it, proofing it, then putting out HTML and plain-text editions.

LinkedIn Violates Library Privacy With LinkedIn Learning

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Many states have laws in place to protect the privacy of libraries. But LinkedIn is violating this with LinkedIn Learning, formerly known as Lynda.com.

Currently, when Lynda.com is accessed through a library, a user logs in with her or his library card and a PIN. No other personal information is required.

Under the new LinkedIn Learning policy, library users would be required to create a personal, publicly searchable, profile and agree to LinkedIn’s user agreement and privacy policy before being able to use LinkedIn Learning.

Checking off the user agreement grants LinkedIn the power to share the information contained in a personal profile with whoever LinkedIn wants.

Libraries are a bastion against corporations, where you can get free resources and just hang out without having to buy anything. I hope this gets resolved in the library’s favor.

Free Video Streaming in New York Public Library Going Away

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Two years ago the New York Public Library and Brooklyn Public Library partnered with free video streaming service Kanopy to give free access to patrons. But they are ending the partnerships on July 1.

Ultimately, this came down to a decision by the libraries, and where to focus their strategic priorities right now. We have witnessed incredible growth in user demand at these libraries over the past couple years and worked with the NYPL, BPL, and QPL to devise innovative new models that give them certainty and supports their budgetary needs.