How to Control iTunes on Your Mac from Your Apple Watch

· · Quick Tip

Adding Custom Ringtones to your iPhone Using iTunes 12.7

Controlling your Mac’s iTunes playback from your Apple Watch is incredibly easy, but you’ve gotta set it up first! In today’s Quick Tip, we’re going to walk you through the process, which we don’t suggest using to annoy your housemates by switching music from afar. (Just kidding—we totally suggest doing that.)

BopPad Uses Smartcloth to Improve Drum Pad Response

· · Cool Stuff Found

There’s a new drum pad out there from Keith McMillen Instruments (KMI) that uses smartcloth to make the device more accurate and responsive. At least that’s what the company claims, and they’re using smart fabric sensors from BeBop Sensors to do it. Funded on Kickstarter last year, BopPad is a, “location and pressure-sensitive drum controller with a wicked-fast playing surface.” I’ve yet to meet an electronic drum I love to play, but I’m looking forward to checking out BopPad. Just watch the video. The device is $199 through the KMI website.

Hey Musicians, How about a Wearable Metronome?

· · Cool Stuff Found

Here’s something for musicians called Soundbrenner Pulse. It’s a wearable metronome that uses haptic feedback so you can feel the beat. The company says that haptic feedback is “up to seven times stronger than the vibrational alerts found in today’s smartwatches.” This is a standalone device that can be strapped around your arm or leg, or worn on your chest. Better yet, it’s controlled by an app that can sync with up to five Soundbrenner Pulses. That means five people in the band could be marching to the same beat! Come on, that could be game changing for musicians! Soundbrenner Pulse is $99 at Amazon, and it’s shipping now.

Hey Musicians, How about a Wearable Metronome?

A-ha's Take On Me Recreated with ARKit is Frakking Awesome

· · Cool Stuff Found

Loads of cool videos showing how compelling iOS 11’s ARKit is are popping up and the latest comes from Trixi Studios. They recreated the hand sketched style from the 1980’s A-ha “Take On Me” music video, but instead of working with a series of drawings they let ARKit do the heavy lifting. The result is a real-time version of the video you can walk through and watch as other people switch from themselves into drawings. It’s yet another example of the huge potential in ARKit.