Flash Releases Latest Zero-day Exploit Patch Early

| News

Good new, Flash users. Adobe has a patch available for the critical security flaw associated with Pawn Storm and cyber-espionage. Adobe recommends installing the update right away, and if you're still a Flash user, that's a good idea because the flaw is currently being exploited.

Adobe patches latest Flash zero-day exploitAdobe said the security flaw affects Flash 19.0.0.207 and earlier on Mac and Windows, and 11.2.205.535 on Linux. The company said the exploit is "being used in limited, targeted attacks."

The company promised a fix would be coming this week, but managed to beat its own schedule. The update actually rolled last Friday several days early.

This is just the latest in a long string of serious security flaws in Adobe Flash and will likely help push more people away from the multimedia platform. Web browsers are already blocking some Flash content, It isn't available on mobile devices, and it isn't installed by default on desktop and laptop computers. Recently Amazon told advertisers it wouldn't support Flash, either.

While some sites still rely heavily on Flash, the growing online trend is to move away from the platform. The Mac Observer has said it's time to move on, too. That said, if you still need Flash be sure to install this update right away.

You can get the most recent Flash update for your operating system by following the links in Adobe's security article.

Good new, Flash users. Adobe has a patch available for the critical security flaw associated with Pawn Storm and cyber-espionage. Adobe recommends installing the update right away, and if you're still a Flash user, that's a good idea because the flaw is currently being exploited.

Adobe said the security flaw affects Flash 19.0.0.207 and earlier on Mac and Windows, and 11.2.205.535 on Linux. The company said the exploit is "being used in limited, targeted attacks."

The company promised a fix would be coming this week, but managed to beat its own schedule. The update actually rolled last Friday several days early.

This is just the latest in a long string of serious security flaws in Adobe Flash and will likely help push more people away from the multimedia platform. Web browsers are already blocking some Flash content, It isn't available on mobile devices, and it isn't installed by default on desktop and laptop computers. Recently Amazon told advertisers it wouldn't support Flash, either.

While some sites still rely heavily on Flash, the growing online trend is to move away from the platform. The Mac Observer has said it's time to move on, too. That said, if you still need Flash be sure to install this update right away.

You can get the most recent Flash update for your operating system by following the links in Adobe's security article.

The Mac Observer Spin The Mac Observer Spin is how we show you what our authors think about a news story at quick glance. Read More →

Adobe released the update for this zero-day exploit early. Good on them, but it would be even better if we didn't have to deal with thes ongoing major security flaws.

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Comments

ibuck

This is just the latest in a long string of serious security flaws in Adobe Flash and will likely help push more people away from the multimedia platform. Web browsers are already blocking some Flash content, It isn’t available on mobile devices, and it isn’t installed by default on desktop and laptop computers. Recently Amazon told advertisers it wouldn’t support Flash, either.
While some sites still rely heavily on Flash, the growing online trend is to move away from the platform. The Mac Observer has said it’s time to move on, too.

They stab it with their steely knives, but they just can’t kill the beast.

It’s amazing that it’s still used on so many websites. Website owners must just be clueless about how many people can’t watch Flash content, or (wisely) refuse to. Stop spending money fruitlessly on Flash.

geoduck

and if you’re still a Flash user, that’s a good idea

Or an even better idea: Reexamine your priorities, and stop using Flash altogether.

ibuck
+1 for the reference

Lee Dronick

The problem isn’t the website visitors who have the Flash Player installed, but the websites that have Flash content. Of course if Flash went away then the hackers would probably start exploiting something else.

Mikuro

I’ve uninstalled Flash. I keep Chrome on hand as a backup browser just for sites that require it. They are few and far between at this point. Internet radio sites are the main stragglers.

CudaBoy

Seems like the post above has bigger problems than Flash - redundancy.
I repeat myself when I’m under stress…I repeat myself when I’m under stress…I repeat myself when I’m under stress…(king crimson)
Flash is great. Still no problems and still the only easy program to create interactive web content - no you can’t save to Quicktime as it’s not interactive. Until I hear of anyone being bitten by a Flash exploit I’ll assume it’s nonsense. I’d be more worried about the porous iOS world which is chronically being exploited - see other article today re: 100’s of Snooping Apps.

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