WWDC: Apple Has Jumped to Light Speed

| Editorial

There was a universe of technology unleashed at the WWDC Keynote this morning. It was designed to amaze, overload and galvanize developers. But what about the customers?

This morning, Tim Cook and his team set the world on fire with enough new technology to keep the whole Apple world busy for months and months. (And the competition in nervous breakdown.) Both digesting the technology and understanding how it will impact customers will be a challenge.

If you followed the Keynote live, hopefully at TMO , then you know the feeling: sensory and technical overload. But then, that’s exactly what the Keynote is designed to do: make the experience of WWDC so overwhelming that it both numbs then ignites the senses of the developers.

In times past, the WWDC Keynote presentations could be directly and immediately linked to the customer. One could come back from WWDC as both a developer or a technology leader, with a CD/DVD or two or three in hand, and press most of the technologies into service as beta products.

Nowadays, however, the breadth and scope of Apple’s technologies have far reaching consequences. The percolation of services into the cloud demands a serious decision and a greater commitment by the customer. The services and features of Mountain Lion and iOS 6 will require some study to see if they fit in with personal needs and preferences.

WWDC recapA full and immediate embrace of everything announced this morning is hardly possible for the average Apple customer. It will take some time for developers absorb all that was presented, with thousands of new APIs, and it will take some time more for customers to wade through all the implications and decide how to integrate the technologies their lives.

For example, our iOS devices are always on, but often we put our Macs in a sleep that disconnects them from the Internet. The technologies Apple is delivering these days suggest that our Macs, also, should never be isolated, never disconnected. And that raises security issues. But then sandboxing and Apple signed certificates help offset the risks. Perhaps.

In addition to all that, the technologies that Apple is developing are increasingly harder to evaluate in isolation. Features of OS X and iOS are no longer just enhancements of a UNIX OS, they are deeply interwoven into the fabric of the Internet.

For example, mapping, dictation, Siri in cars, AirPlay on the Mac, notifications, iCloud, FaceTime on cellular networks, Game Center, Passbook, Facebook and Twitter integration all blur the lines beween personal computing and the social mind. That makes the implications of what we adopt and what we do tougher to understand and evaluate. Welcome to light speed.

Anyway, In time, things will settle just enough for all of here at TMO to make sense of what we heard this morning and help you navigate through it. That is, after the shell shock dissipates.

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Comments

geoduck

Some of the technology was amazing but it was a mixed bag for me
Mapping: Looks Great
Dictation: Looks Great
Siri in cars: Irrelevant. I don’t have it on my iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch yet
AirPlay on the Mac: Looks Great
Notifications: Looks Great
Cloud: Great improvements. I might even start using it more.
FaceTime on cellular networks: Irrelevant
Game Center: Irrelevant
Passbook: Could be useful, someday
Facebook and Twitter integration: Not just irrelevant. The very first thing I’ll be looking for is a way to kill this. As Dave said during the keynote “Facebook also synced with your contact list. This is a good thing, right?” Dave, the answer is a resounding NO!

The hardware was a mixed bag too, the MacBook Pro’s are fantastic. I will have trouble deciding which wonderful system is right for me. On the other hand it’s embarrassing that they thought they could call the changed Mac Pro “new”.

It was a very black and white keynote. Some great, some mediocre, with not much middle ground. If Apple has jumped to light speed then part of the Apple Fleet is still on Impulse Power.

jbruni

Sometimes Apple technology doesn’t always hold up to real use (e.g. AOCE, Edition Manager, OpenDoc) and eventually gets dropped. I’ll wager Passbook will take its place in that list.

BurmaYank

There’d better be a quick straightforward way of totally disconnecting my Facebook account from every other function on my iOS devices and Macs without crippling or degrading those functions or making them different in any way from how my iOS devices and Macs would normally function if I had no Facebook account, otherwise, I will be sticking with my current version of iOS and SL indefinitely.

I would love to have Siri & lots of the other features of those upgrades, but I’m so very frightened of Facebook’s invasive tentacles that I feel impelled to forego them all.

geoduck

There?d better be a quick straightforward way of totally disconnecting my Facebook account from every other function

Agreed. I’d only make one change
There DAMN WELL better be a quick straightforward way of totally disconnecting my Facebook account from every other function

other side

There DAMN WELL better be a quick straightforward way of totally disconnecting my Facebook account from every other function

And the way had better work EXACTLY as promised.

None of this business of turning all the switches off, but info gets sent off to Facebook anyway…

Lancashire-Witch

I don’t have Facebook account - and I’ve opted out of Facebook “invitations”.  Not upgrading Apple software versus having Facebook - seems like an easy decision to me.

Lee Dronick

I will wait to see how the operating systems connect with Facebook before making a judgement about that. I hope that, and am pretty sure that things are optional. I have a Facebook account and am active there. However, I practice safe Facebooking and don’t give them too much.

Aftermac

This Facebook non-sense is optional right? The turn-by-turn navigation pretty well clinched that I’ll switch from Android to iPhone, but needing a facebook account would be a deal breaker.

Robert

Apple is about to face a perfect storm:

Android on Mobile space - in the words of Droid users, all the new features of iOS6 are actually not (except for Apple).

Windows RT on the tablet - a full no compromise OS on the tablet - support for multiple users with web based logins (and a ecosystem that supports it) and a fully featured browser (dare I say the word…fla##)

Windows 8 - touch to the main OS. (I know Apple has a strong stance on this one - but look how many people go to touch their screens after using an iPad for a while…). Also web based logins - facilitating syncing across multiple devices.

So the standout feature for new Apple hardware (iPad and macbook)? - Retina display - and its only available on one model.

I’m a longtime iPhone and Mac user but this year is going to be very interesting…

danf

Pretty disappointing WWDC on the hardware front.  Apple clearly, clearly has no interest in computing any longer.  I would never count on Apple being competitive in Maps.  That is an application that will require constant updates, and improvements.  My guess is that the maps software team is already being disbanded and wont be reconstituted again until next years update.  Google should be able to respond within months.

It’s been a long time - almost 2 years since I’ve bought any apple product.  I’d like to, but there is just nothing compelling.  Its all very minor tweaks.  Not sure about the new MBPro.  I’ll have to actually use one to see how useful the screen is with applications and OS that are mostly resolution dependent.

ibuck

I agree geoduck, burma yank, & L-witch, Facebook represents invasive anti-private corporate chudzpah, any it’s scary that Apple is getting in bed with them. 

If this new software isn’t opt-in (rather than opt-out), easy and relatively painless, I won’t be upgrading either, despite being on the cusp of buying a new Mac.

acdc1174

I watched the keynote in its entirety after reading all of the big sites’ online pontifications. NOTHING in the keynote led me to believe that the Facebook integration would be ANYTHING other than optional.  Just like the Twitter integration is in iOS 5.

rwahrens

Don’t want Facebook integration?  Don’t log in.

Just like in iOS, you go to a central spot and log into Facebook, which kicks off the system wide integration.  No login, no integration. It’s off by default. Hell, it was part of the keynote, just in case you were watching!

Geez, people, stop hyperventilating.

skipaq

Don’t really get all the hardware angst; this is after all an OS conference. There are all new iMacs and Mac Pros coming (not the Pros announced at WWDC).

On the OS side there is a lot to look forward to; although I share the concerns with Facebook integration. I don’t agree that Maps will bomb. They have been working on this since Android shipped and it is too important to neglect. AND it is much better than the previous Maps.

noworryz

The elephant in the room is that, with the exception of the new MPB, the reaction to this year?s WWDC keynote is ?that?s interesting? rather than ?I want one.?  Let?s hope this isn?t the start of the long slide into Spindlerdom.

Lee Dronick

The elephant in the room is that, with the exception of the new MPB, the reaction to this year?s WWDC keynote is ?that?s interesting? rather than ?I want one.?? Let?s hope this isn?t the start of the long slide into Spindlerdom.

The attendees are not the people who buy most of the Apple products. It is the end user, not the developer, who is Apple’s biggest customer demographic.

ibuck

rwahrens said:

Don?t want Facebook integration?? Don?t log in.

Sorry, it’s just not that simple. Many websites now require you to use Facebook to log in and post comments. What I (we?) desire is a very easy way to turn Facebook on when we have to, then off. Apple should be aware of this and facilitate that switching in a typical Apple Ease of Use way: easier in fact than switching Airplane Mode on and off.

Lee Dronick

Sorry, it?s just not that simple. Many websites now require you to use Facebook to log in and post comments.

But most don’t require that. Also if you boycott the ones that do then eventually they may change the way that they do things. Let the website know your feelings on that.

Anyway more details on the Apple and Facebook integration will be announced soon enough. Hopefully it will be easy to turn it on and off.

rwahrens

Many websites now require you to use Facebook to log in and post comments.

“require”??  No, and the option is only “required” if you don’t have an alternative login.

Besides, we were talking about OS X Mountain Lion, where you do NOT HAVE TO login to Facebook, unless you want to use the integrated aspects of OS X and Facebook.

rwahrens

Hopefully it will be easy to turn it on and off.

From what the keynote showed, you don’t “turn it on” or “off”, but simply go to a control panel and login to your Facebook account, which activates the integration.  That was demonstrated.

The question is, if you don’t login, does it still show Facebook buttons, etc., or does it hide them until you do login?

Again, folks here are just getting way too hyperventilated over this.

Lee Dronick

?require???? No, and the option is only ?required? if you don?t have an alternative login.

I have seen some where I didn’t see an option to use an alternative login, not very many though.

Besides, we were talking about OS X Mountain Lion, where you do NOT HAVE TO login to Facebook, unless you want to use the integrated aspects of OS X and Facebook.

Quite right!

The only person here who should be gnashing until we get all of the details is our friend Gnasher.

eolake

While watching the keynote, everything seemed damn impressive. And okay, the retina MacBook is awesome, if I didn’t work from home I’d get it for sure. But otherwise, after sobering up (figuratively!), it occurs to me that basically everything new here is social-media driven or at least file-hosting driven.

And while I am for communication in general, the reality of the twitter/Facebook world just seems so hollow to me. Nothing in it interest me. If somebody has something interesting to say, it is much more likely to arrive in an article or an email than in social media space.

In the end I realised that I am just not likely to actually use any of the new features in iOS 6 or Mountain Lion.

bp

I’m glad I’m not the only one that shares Facebook integration concerns. I use Facebook daily strictly for entertainment purposes but something about Facebook just screams privacy problems to me. I almost consider them a malware type website. I don’t know why I feel that way, it’s just something about them.

The good thing is that it’s optional but it’s there for people who rely on Facebook heavily to promote there business or themselves. It’s an invaluable tool for that so I understand why they did it.

Also, if Facebook goes away then they can remove it with a software update.

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