Google Stadia and Apple AR Gaming, Good Data Collection, with Andrew Orr - ACM 506

· · Apple Context Machine Podcast

Apple Context Machine Logo

Google Stadia looks likely to shake up the gaming world, but there’s more than one way to skin a gaming cat, and Apple is focused on AR. Bryan Chaffin is joined by guest cohost Andrew Orr to discuss how those different tracts might fare. They also talk about the good sides of corporate data surveillance, and yes, they will both forgive you if you are surprised either would entertain such a notion.

The Least Secure Programming Languages

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C++ code

The design, structure and syntax of a programming language can lead the average programmer into a minefield of unsuspected programming errors. Those errors lead to vulnerabilities.

But which languages are the most and least secure in the end?

To answer this question, the report compiled information from WhiteSource’s database, which aggregates information on open source vulnerabilities from sources including the National Vulnerability Database (NVD), security advisories, GitHub issue trackers, and popular open source projects issue trackers.

This TechRepublic article presents the list.

Movavi Video Editor 15 Plus For Mac: $19

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Movavi Video Editor 15 Plus For Mac

We have a deal on the Movavi Video Editor Plus for Mac. This movie editor lets you animate objects with keyframes, has more than 160 filters, has multitrack editing and built-in soundtracks, a montage wizard, transitions, and a lot more. Check out the full feature list in our deal listing. It’s $19 through our deal.

Final Cut Pro, Motion, Compressor, iMovie Updated Today

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Apple has updated a bunch of its Mac apps today, including Final Cut Pro, Motion, Compressor, and iMovie.

For all four apps, Apple has added a feature that detects media files that could be incompatible with future versions of macOS after Mojave. In Final Cut Pro and iMovie, these files will be converted to a compatible format, while just highlighted in Motion and Compressor.

Apple Buys App Backend Startup Stamplay

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LONDON – Apple has reportedly acquired Italian start-up Stamplay. AppleInsider reported that the deal is worth $5.6 million.  The company provides developers with a backend from which they can run their app in the cloud. It likely attracted Apple’s interest as a way of helping  iOS app developers.

Using a web-based editor, the service can combine together multiple APIs for payments, notifications, messaging, and other elements, with Stamplay handling the majority of the coding. Newspaper Il Sore 24 Ore reports the acquisition is valued at 5 million euro, with the purchase requiring the founders to become Apple employees, though it is unclear if it is an acquihire or a complete acquisition of the business. Founders Nicola Mattina and Guiliano Iacobelli grew the company to have three offices in Rome, London, and San Francisco, and has received about 800 thousand euro in funding. The company also won Visa’s “Everywhere Initiative” project in 2016, gaining it work from the card company.

AirPower Image Hidden on Updated AirPods Page

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AirPower wireless charging mat with iPhone X, Apple Watch, and AirPods

An official AirPower image was hidden in the source code of the updated AirPods page, it has emerged. 9to5Mac found the image, which showed an iPhone XS and new AirPods being charged on the as-yet unreleased charging mat.  AirPower was not one of the products Apple released during the first half of this week. Indeed, a release date is still unknown.

Many were expecting an AirPower announcement today, following the iMac, iPad Air and iPad mini, and second-generation AirPods, but that didn’t happen this morning at the same time as the prior announcements. We aren’t sure when Apple is planning to announce the mat’s actual release, but clearly the AirPods page was specially designed to be able to incorporate the AirPower mat when it is official. And the change of image asset certainly indicates continued development on the product.

Moleskine Launches Sketch App Called Moleskine Flow

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Moleskine Flow is an all-new way to create simple drawings, complex works of art, and beautiful notes all on your iPad and iPhone. Moleskine Flow has been built from the ground up with creators in mind, offering dozens of combinations for paper types, colors, and tools. And by pairing its custom drawing technology with Apple Pencil, Flow feels as responsive as drawing on real paper. The app’s flexibility serves amateurs and professionals alike, offering powerful art tools in an accessible format. With Flow, everyone can create sketches, lists, storyboards, designs, handwritten notes, floor plans, recipes, diagrams, journals and works of art. It’s the perfect space for ideas to be created, captured and shared. Download Moleskine Flow to try it free for seven days. After your free trial, Flow requires a subscription which provides you with regular app updates and realtime cloud storage of your documents. App Store: Free (Offers In-App Purchases)

Moleskine Launches Sketch App Called Moleskine Flow

Pay Bills With Apple Pay Using Doxo

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A bill payment app called doxo is adding the ability to pay bills with Apple Pay. With doxo you already have a single account from which to pay your bills. With Apple Pay you now have a safe, secure way to pay them. Steve Shivers, doxo CEO, said:

This is just one of many steps we’re taking on our mission to greatly simplify and reduce the hassle of bill pay for our millions of users, and thereby bring new benefits to the billers on doxo.

doxo currently serves over 2.5 million users who make payments to over 45,000 local and national businesses, making doxo the largest bill pay directory in the nation. I looked at doxo’s privacy policy and it sounds legit, too. I’m not sure how this free app makes them money but it doesn’t sound like it’s from selling customer data. App Store: Free

Pay Bills With Apple Pay Using Doxo

Latest iPad Mini Combines Old and New

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The iPad mini reviews are starting to flood in. In his, Lance Ulanoff noted, somewhat disappointedly, that many features from the old version of the device remain. There is even still a mechanical home button. However, he liked the significantly increased power of the upgraded device. He also though the iPad mini is an excellent tool for augmented reality.

Put simply, there are zero design surprises in the new iPad Mini. It’s still just 0.24 inches thick and 0.66 pounds. (The chassis measures 8×5.3 inches.) My hand is large enough that I can easily wrap my fingers around it, but the Mini is also light and thin enough that it’s quite easy to hold with just two fingers squeezing a single corner. That exquisitely svelte design (thinner even than the 0.3-inch-thick iPhone XS) belies some astonishing power. Because even though Apple didn’t mess with the iPad Mini’s body, it replaced most of the components.

iPad mini: Powerful Hardware in the Same Package

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Some of the first iPad mini reviews are coming out, and so far it sounds like Matthew Panzarino is happy with it.

I include that context here because, though the iPad Pro is a whole ass computer and really capable, it is not exactly ‘fun’ to use in non standard ways. That’s where the iPad mini has always shined and continues to do so. It really is pocketable in a loose jacket or coat. Because the mini is not heavy, it exercises little of the constant torsion and strain on your wrist that a larger iPad does, making it one-handed.

 

Fast Track Your Fluency with a New Approach to Learning Languages: $59

· · TMO Deals

Mondly on iPhone

We have a deal on a lifetime subscription to Mondly, the language-learning platform. Mondly uses speech recognition and only gives positive feedback if you speak clearly and correctly. You can choose 5 of 33 languages to learn in your own native tongue. A lifetime subscription is $59 through our deal, a price drop from when we ran this deal last year.

Air & Space Museum Posts Photos of its Star Trek Enterprise Studio Model

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The Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum has posted 76 photos of its NCC-1701 Enterprise 3.4 meter studio model.

This model of the fictional starship Enterprise was used in the weekly hour-long Star Trek TV show (NBC-TV), which aired from September 1966 until June 1969.

The model’s principal designer, Walter “Matt” Jefferies, created several different ideas for the Enterprise’s design to fit the requirements provided by Star Trek’s creator Gene Roddenberry. To support the final design suggestion, Jefferies also created a rough 4-inch balsa and cardboard prototype. A 33-inch “pilot” model mostly of solid wood was then built by model-maker Richard C. Datin under subcontract to the Howard Anderson Company. Enlarging the plans for that model resulted in the final 11-foot model shown here.

Air & Space Museum Posts Photos of its Star Trek Enterprise Studio Model