These AI-Created People Don't Exist

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AI generated face

Digital Trends writes: “While it’s been clear for quite some time that modern A.I. is getting pretty darn good at generating accurate human faces, it’s a reminder of just how far we’ve come…”  The face shown here is just one of many created by an AI, explained in the article. “The results … well, you can see them for yourself by checking out the website. Hitting refresh will iterate an entirely new face.”

Soon there will be artificial people on the internet writing AI created articles. (I am actually one of them.)

In The Future You Could 'Clarify' Tweets (But Still Not Edit)

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Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey announced the company is considering adding a feature that would let you explain tweets by adding new or additional context (via Mashable). [Touch Twitter’s Sparkle and Something Wonderful Will Happen] Clarification This sounds like Twitter is considering clarification instead of editing. So while you won’t be able to correct that typo,…

Apple's Classical Music Problem

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Last year Apple Music got its very own classical music section, but it seems as if it has languished ever since.

Frustrations with classical music streaming are nothing new, but as Charles tells us, this is a problem that affects nearly every streaming music service, including Apple Music rival Spotify. In an effort to find out exactly what’s wrong with classical music on Apple Music — and what steps could be taken to address these problems — we asked Charles and Rumiz to detail the biggest issues with classical music on Apple Music.

How to Manage Your Online Personal Data

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Louise Matakis put together a guide on how to manage your online personal data, and figuring out who buys, sells, and barters it.

Personal data is often compared to oil—it powers today’s most profitable corporations, just like fossil fuels energized those of the past. But the consumers it’s extracted from often know little about how much of their information is collected, who gets to look at it, and what it’s worth. Every day, hundreds of companies you may not even know exist gather facts about you, some more intimate than others. That information may then flow to academic researchers, hackers, law enforcement, and foreign nations—as well as plenty of companies trying to sell you stuff.

A good guide as usual from Wired.

Sir Tim Berners-Lee Wants to Fix the Web with New Startup

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Sir Tim Berners Lee, the inventor or the World Wide Web, has a new, a project. Called Inrupt, it wants to develop a new web structure to put people back in control of their data. Data would be stored on an individual’s “pod” instead of a company’s server. Wired spoke to Sir Tim about the project.

Inrupt aims to drive the development of the Solid platform and transform it from an innovative idea to a viable platform for businesses and consumers. “My group in the CSAIL [Computer Sciences and Artifical Intelligence Laboratory] Lab at MIT had been working on Solid for some years,” Berners-Lee says. “The initial goal of Inrupt is to add the energy and resources of a startup to the open-source efforts to make the Solid movement happen.”

7-in-1 MacBook Pro USB-C Hub: $34.99

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7-in-1 MacBook Pro USB-C Hub

We have a deal on a 7-in-1 MacBook Pro USB-C hub. This device has one Thunderbolt 3 Type-C port, two USB 3.0 ports, an HDMI port, and SDXC, micro SDXC, and TF card ports. You can get it through our deal for $34.99.

This AI Tool Scares the Crap Out of Elon Musk

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OpenAI, an AI research institute cofounded by Elon Musk and Sam Altman, built an AI text generator that its creators worry is dangerous.

Jack Clark, policy director at OpenAI, says that example shows how technology like this might shake up the processes behind online disinformation or trolling, some of which already use some form of automation. “As costs of producing text fall, we may see behaviors of bad actors alter,” he says.

Based on the examples I think it’s safe to say this AI would pass the Turing Test.

Allstate's iCracked Purchase Could be a Win For Consumers

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Insurance company Allstate’s purchase of repair firm iCracked Tuesday confirmed its position as a key player in the right to repair movement. Malcolm Owen on AppleInsider commented that the deal could help Allstate speed up device repairs claims process. In the future, customers may only have to be without a phone for hours, not days.

At the same time as bolstering its consumer offerings, acquiring iCracked also makes Allstate a major force in the right to repair movement in the United States, due to its business involving third-party repairs. Repair.org executive director Gay Gordon-Byrne confirmed to Motherboard the outfit has already loaned a lobbyist to assist the push for legislation in New Hampshire. The purchase is already being seen as a positive for the movement, with iFixit CEO Kyle Wiens claiming “I’m optimistic that this partnership will elevate the visibility of the work that we’re doing together.

It's Not Just Amazon - Lots of Residents Don't Want a Tech Giant as Their Neighbour

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This week, Amazon scrapped plans for a New York headquarters. However, it is not just in Queens where local residents don’t want a tech giant setting up a campus. As Rick Noak pointed out in the Washington Post, there is growing opposition from people in Berlin, Melbourne, and Dublin to tech firms expanding in their cities.  In Melbourne, the opposition is to an Apple flagship store. They may be thousands of miles apart, but residents in these cities share some coming concerns.

Tech companies bring in small armies of workers but these are rarely recruited from the neighborhoods in question and the new arrivals drive up prices for locals. There is also often opposition to the companies on ideological grounds or simply the fact that a global corporation is taking over key parts of beloved neighborhoods. While city leaders may love the new additions, residents don’t.

Buycott Lets You Make Value-Based Shopping Decisions

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I think it’s great if you can do business with companies that align with your personal values. This can go both ways. I like Apple’s stance on environmentalism and privacy. Other people boycott Starbucks because its cups don’t mention the word Christmas, or buy dophin-safe tuna. Whether we agree with those shopping decisions or roll our eyes, we’re avoiding or gravitating towards companies that support what we believe in. It’s pure free market capitalism. Which is why apps like Buycott are helpful. With this app you can: Join campaigns to support causes you care about, scan product barcodes to learn a product’s history, and make a purchase decision on the product and communicate your decision to the company. One thing to keep in mind: Buycott’s privacy policy says the app collects your location and other data. App Store: Free

Buycott Lets You Make Value-Based Shopping Decisions