Apple Not Involved So Far in ‘Do Not Track’ Button For Browsers

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Major browser makers will be adding “Do Not Track” buttons to their software this year, except Apple, which is “not engaged” in the endeavor right now, Stuart Ingis, Digital Advertising Alliance (DAA) counsel, told Mashable. Mr. Ingis noted that the DAA “is holding the door open” for Apple’s later involvement.

Apple is not part of the DAA, and it did not give Mashable a comment on the matter. DAA members have begun working on the Do Not Track button in response to the Obama administration’s issuance of a Consumer Bill of Rights for online data tracking.

DAA member Google will add the button to Chrome. Susan Wojcicki, Google’s Senior Vice-President of Advertising, said in a statement: “We’re pleased to join a broad industry agreement to respect the ‘do-not-track’ header in a consistent and meaningful way that offers users choice and clearly explained browser controls.”

Mr. Ingus said the Do Not Track button will force Google and other companies to refrain from displaying ads based on web browsing behavior when the user activates it. However, such data will still be available for market research and product creation, as well as for law enforcement when crimes are being investigated.

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13 Comments Leave Your Own

LarryR

Sooo… Google et al are still going to track me, they just won’t display custom ads? They want to block the one non-creepy thing that tracking enables? the one thing that you could argue is actually useful to consumers.

Guess I’ll just keep Ghostery updated.

webjprgm

Ditto LarryR’s comments.  But the ads are the one way the customer can tell s/he’s being tracked.  The part they are keeping is the invisible part.  Thus this whole thing is about show.

Plus who/what is enforcing the do-not-track header rules anyway? A Google search reveals that there is no legislation enforcing it now but that some people want there to be.  That legislation would have to make do-not-track really mean do not track me, not just, pretend you aren’t tracking me by not showing me targeted ads.

Richard

Safari 5.2 has a Do Not Track option in the preferences. It’s labelled “Tell browsers not to track me”. This option had previously been available in the Develop menu since 10.7 came out with a slight different name (I can’t remember, but I think it mentions HTTP headers along with not tracking).

How do these options affect your report and the comments from DAA?

zewazir

“...as well as for law enforcement when crimes are being investigated.”  So .gov wants to track our network usage, just in case they have to investigate a crime, huh?  But tracking us to customize advertising profiles is not OK? Talk about your two-faced, double-blind bull-stuff. If law enforcement wants to invade my privacy, they can darned well get a court order FIRST, THEN talk about adding software that tracks my net usage.  Anything else is an endrun around our Constitutional protections, a habit of government which I was heartily tired of even before the days of Patriot Act, Patriot II, FISA, and the latest National Defense Authorization Act fiasco.  Big Brother IS watching!!!!

Lee Dronick

Safari 5.2 has a Do Not Track option in the preferences. It?s labelled ?Tell browsers not to track me?. This option had previously been available in the Develop menu since 10.7 came out with a slight different name (I can?t remember, but I think it mentions HTTP headers along with not tracking).

“Send Do Not Track HTTP Header”

I am mixed on the do not track issue. On one hand it seems kind of creepy, like a stalker following you around. On the other hand advertising pays for “free” websites such as this one and seeing ads for items that interest me are better than ones for stuff I will never buy.

iJack

I just installed Do Not Track Plus as a Firefox add-on, about two hours ago.  It says that my “total” is 192 blocked, and I haven’t been using Firefox between installing and now.

I wonder what that means….

Lee Dronick
Lee Dronick

I installed Do Not Track yesterday and quickly got a high score. However, I was surprised to see how many websites are not tracking. Unless they are coming in under the radar.

iJack

Lee ~ I forgot to add that several months ago I changed my FF Privacy settings to “tell websites I do not want to be tracked.”  Since my “blocked” has now reached over 350, does that mean the FF settings were not working?

I also just watched the Colbert link.
I always loved Target.  Now, I’m afraid.  Very afraid.

Lee Dronick

Lee ~ I forgot to add that several months ago I changed my FF Privacy settings to ?tell websites I do not want to be tracked.?? Since my ?blocked? has now reached over 350, does that mean the FF settings were not working?

I don’t know for sure, but I think the Do Not Track number isn’t related to Facebook settings. More that it is the number of tracking cookies that being blocked as you visit various websites.

Try a web search on yourself and see what shows up from Facebook.

One thing I recommend is to logout of Facebook when leaving the website.

iJack

iJack: I changed my FF Privacy settings to ?tell websites I do not want to be tracked.?

Lee Dronick: I think the Do Not Track number isn?t related to Facebook settings.

Lee ~ FF = Firefox, not Facebook.

Lee Dronick

See today’s Joy of Tech Comic, it is tracking related.

iJack

That’s pretty funny, but my local library’s computer room is only a block away. 

Just sayin…  grin

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