Apple Releases 2010 Supplier Responsibility Report

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Apple's latest supplier responsibility report is out, and it includes information for over 100 facility audits, compliance issues, and working conditions. The Mac and iPhone requires its suppliers to follow a detailed code of conduct as part of its contract, and that also includes factory audits, monitoring programs, and corrective action plans when necessary.

Apple reported that it took a "leadership stance" in ethical recruitment and management of contract workers outside the United States, resulting in some US$2.2 million in reimbursements for recruitment fee overcharges. The company also launched a "train the trainer" program for assembly plant managers covering workers rights that over 133,000 managers, supervisors and workers have attended.

The number of facilities inspected in jumped up to 102, compared to 83 in 2008, and 39 in 2007.

Five of Apple's six final assembly manufacturers rated between 90 percent and 99 percent for compliance in their 2009 audits. The sixth facility dropped from 92 percent to 86 percent due to changes in standards.

Along with its facility checks, Apple has been offering guidelines for standards relating to dormitories, juvenile workers, medical non-discrimination, pregnancy non-discrimination, involuntary labor prevention, working hours, and wages and benefits.

Apple's full 2010 supplier responsibility report is available at the company's Web site in PDF format.

Comments

daemon

Jeff,

I know you’re just announcing that Apple filed a report, but don’t you think you could point out that Apple has completely ignored the issues of the n-hexane related death that happened in February 2010 along with the summer 2009 n-hexane abuse and medical response. On top of that workers at a Mexico assembly plant were being forced to work unpaid over-time, Foxconn’s torture and subsequent death of an employee who lost a prototype, and the assault and battery of a journalist outside one of the Chinese manufacturing plants?

I mean, really, if Apple considers all these actions to qualify as being “86%” compliant…

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