British Licensing Authority: No UK iCloud Music Until 2012

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Apple is still at an early stage in negotiating with licensing groups in the UK and isn’t likely to launch the music features of iCloud, including iTunes Match, until 2012. Comments from the Performing Right Society (PRS) were backed up by a major record label executive, according to London-based The Telegraph.

Apple introduced iCloud earlier this week during a keynote address at the company’s annual World Wide Developer Conference. iCloud offers a host of document hosting and syncing services, including the ability to have most of your iTunes purchases (music, apps, and iBooks) synced to any and every Mac and iOS device you have.

While iCloud is free, the company also introduced iTunes Match, a paid service that will also synch the music in your library that came from sources other than iTunes (i.e. CD, other online services, or music stolen through piracy).

For the U.S., Apple secured licensing for iTunes Match and the free iTunes syncing service through record labels in the U.S., but such rights have to be negotiated on a country-by-country basis, even in the European Union, where music rights are not universal. Such negotiations take time, which was why the iTunes Music Store itself was rolled out in the U.S. first, and then brought to other markets later.

“The licensing team at the PRS have started talks with Apple, but are a long way off from any deals being signed. […] It is very much the early stages of the negotiations and is similar to the launch of iTunes – which began in the US and took a while to roll out to other countries,” the group told the newspaper.

An unnamed record executive added, “Tentative talks have begun between the major labels and Apple in the UK. However, all talks are at the really early stages and no one expects to see the cloud music service live on this side of the pond until 2012.”

Apple has not yet announced plans for iCloud in the UK, and the company didn’t comment for the story.

Comments

Lancashire-Witch

Apple has not yet announced plans for iCloud in the UK, and the company didn?t comment for the story

For the rest of the world - I hope this doesn’t mean MobileMe might die before iCloud is born.

I have an Apple email telling me iCloud will be available this fall (fortunately I can translate that grin .... )  Could that be wrong? Or are worldwide rollout difficulties confined to iTunes Match ?

furbies

If Apple has only managed to do a deal with the US music biz, then why didn’t Apple point out the distinction about who was able to download purchased music to other iDevices ? during the iCloud announcement ?

And as Lancashire-Witch points out, what if Apple can’t do a deal before Mobile Me ends ?
Should we (the rest of the world) pay for an incomplete iCloud service because Apple can’t deliver ?


Apple seems to be going down the path of Micro$oft: Announce now, and fill in the details/reality later!

Bad Apple, bad Apple!

J

re: @furbies

perhaps not quite so bad as all that…  at the keynote apple stated quite clearly that itunes match would only be available in the states.  icloud will be globally available—it doesn’t depend on license agreements with music publishers.

mobile me doesn’t have any music service today, so replacing mobile me with icloud is not affected by these negotiations.

furbies

mobile me doesn?t have any music service today, so replacing mobile me with icloud is not affected by these negotiations.

J

You’re right, but it seems unfair (?) that we on the far side of the planet miss out on services that the US will get.

I would have viewed the keynote, but here in Oz we pay through the nose for internet access, and I can’t justify an upgrade in speed/data allowance so I can watch things like the keynote.

The music oligarchy here in Australia has had to be dragged kicking & screaming in the the present day, and if they’d had their way we’d have to pay through the nose just to copy CDs we own into iTunes so we can enjoy music on the move.

furbies…

Simon

Could that be wrong? Or are worldwide rollout difficulties confined to iTunes Match ?

iCloud works worldwide now. There are developers testing their apps in beta versions today. It’s only the licensing for iTunes Match, one solitary feature, that won’t be available worldwide on day 1.

Should we (the rest of the world) pay for an incomplete iCloud service because Apple can?t deliver ?

Nope. Which is why it’s free. So you don’t have to pay.

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