In-store iPhone 4S Purchases Limited to Reservations

| News

Apple released the iPhone 4S only four days ago, and is already working to control store inventories by limiting new purchases to reservations only. The change means that shoppers wanting an iPhone 4S can’t just walk into an Apple Store, but instead must place a reservation for their new phone the night before.

Apple’s retail store Web site now tells customers the iPhone 4S is available on a first-come, first-served basis, and that they must reserve their new phone after 9PM the night before they come in to make their purchase.

iPhone 4S: By reservation onlyiPhone 4S: By reservation only

It’s no surprise that Apple is already strictly controlling the flow of iPhones out of its stores. The company sold over 4 million units during the first three days of availability, and managed to sell over 1 million phones during the first 24 hours of preorder availability, too.

Apple unveiled the iPhone 4S during a media event earlier this month. The new model uses the same body design as the iPhone 4, but includes a dual core A5 processor, a new antenna design, better battery life, built-in combination GSM and CDMA cell network support, an 8 megapixel camera, Siri voice control, and more.

Customers lined up early for the chance to be among the first to get their hands on an iPhone 4S on October 14, and lines remained steady through launch day.

The iPhone 4S is available with a black or white body in 16GB (US$199), 32GB ($299) and 64GB ($399) capacities — assuming you can get your hands on one.

Comments

ibuck

When Apple launched the iPhone 4 in 2010, they sold 1.7 million in the first three days, and were criticized for being unable to match demand.
So Apple had more than double that number available for the launch of the iPhone 4S, a product that was widely criticized as “disappointing.” And still it wasn’t enough to match demand.

A couple of observations:

1. Despite the criticism, this is a good problem to have. I bet HP (and others) would love to have this problem for their phones or tablets.

2. Why does anyone pay attention to these critics?

3. Wouldn’t you love it if there was a web site that chronicled the opinions of journalists / bloggers, noting how often they were correct and how often off the mark, so that readers could know how much credence to give them?

furbies

3. Wouldn?t you love it if there was a web site that chronicled the opinions of journalists / bloggers, noting how often they were correct and how often off the mark, so that readers could know how much credence to give them?

ibuck

Apple Death Knell Counter

ibuck

Dear Furbies, thank you for that reminder, but I want something broader.

I was actually thinking of something that went beyond just Apple commentary, including news itself. It would cover many subjects, including computer technology & mobile devices, news, economics, politics, etc. It would span many web pages and require a robust search engine, not to mention dedicated, honest watchdogs. Perhaps it would be structured like Wikipedia, and funded by donations or subscriptions.

Despite all the information available to us, too frequently we are buffaloed into decisions, even worldviews, when essential, salient facts are omitted/withheld and less significant ones emphasized. This is commonly done in order to present the journalist’s/ blogger’s / newscaster’s opinion in the most favorable manner. That is, as fact, when, in truth, it’s too often just a misinformed or deceptive opinion.

This would help us know who is being straight with us, and who’s trying to put one over on us.  Those who bring us news & opinion would have to take more responsibility for their actions. Or be identified as inaccurate, misleading, wacky or deceptive.

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