iOS 7 Rockets to 70% Acceptance in North America

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Apple's iOS 7, released on September 18, 2013, has rocketed to over 70 percent adoption on iPhones in North America and is poised to greatly outpace iOS 6 in its first six months. The iPad is not far behind.

The adoption of iOS 7 has been meteoric, according to a Chitika research report, recently released, which collated data from tens of millions of U.S. and Canadian iOS-based ad impressions from roughly November 2012 to November 2013. Because the sample size is so large, it is very likely of statistical significance.

Chitika, in its recent report, published a sand chart showing the rate of adoption of iOS 7.

Image Credit: Chitika

In more detail, iOS 7 now has a 74.1 percent presence on iPhones and 63.8 percent presence on iPads. About a quarter of both platforms are still running iOS 6.

Chitika wrote:

The latest analysis again underscores that iPhone users, and iPad users to a lesser extent, update at extremely high rates, acting as a distinctive selling point when it comes to attracting application and mobile Web developers to the platform.

Chitika has provided a link at the end of its results page for more data.

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Comments

mrmwebmax

+

Also helping the adoption rate, I’d think, is the ease with which users can upgrade, and that Apple—not the carriers—pushes out the updates. Lack of fragmentation also has to help, especially when compared to Android.

Steffen Jobbs

I wouldn’t think less fragmentation helps Apple at all.  Wall Street is only interested in how many devices can be sold, not how easy the product is to manage after ownership.  Apart from developers, everyone else considers fragmentation on the Android platform as an acceptable trade-off for low prices.  I doubt most consumers even care if their Android devices become updated or not as long as the device works relatively well.  I’m sure there are so many Android users happy with Gingerbread that KitKat wouldn’t have any interest to them.  Of course, they’d never be able to run KitKat anyway with their old devices.

The bottom line is Android is the preferred OS of the entire world because Android devices cost a lot less than Apple devices or any other OS devices and nothing else matters.  I believe Wall Street thinks Apple’s iOS lack of fragmentation as a negative point because it weighs like an anchor on overall sales.  iOS is seen as the big loser by the tech industry and investors alike.

mrmwebmax

+

The bottom line is Android is the preferred OS of the entire world because Android devices cost a lot less than Apple devices or any other OS devices and nothing else matters.  I believe Wall Street thinks Appleā€™s iOS lack of fragmentation as a negative point because it weighs like an anchor on overall sales.  iOS is seen as the big loser by the tech industry and investors alike.

Android is the most popular OS in mobile for a number of reasons, not the least of which is cost. In addition, though, another factor is that countless vendors are making countless Android devices, whereas Apple is one company with a few current iPhone models and a few current iPad models. So yes, Android devices outnumber iOS devices, but does that make iOS a “big loser”?

If you look at individual products, the iPhone 5S is, as of this very day, the top-selling handset on all major US carriers, while the iPhone 5c is at #2 or #3:

www.forbes.com/sites/chuckjones/2013/12/13/survey-shows-apples-iphone-5s-and-5c-top-sellers-at-all-four-u-s-wireless-carriers/

As for tablets, as of yesterday, 72% of those planning to purchase a tablet are choosing the iPad, leaving all remaining tablets scrambling for scraps:

appleinsider.com/articles/13/12/12/72-of-prospective-tablet-buyers-plan-to-buy-apples-ipad—-report

In Japan, over half of the top-ten best-selling tablets are iPads:

www.macgasm.net/2013/12/11/ipad-marketshare-japan-2013/

As for actual use of devices, study after study has shown that more people actively use iOS than Android, despite unit volume sales. This story repeated itself on Black Friday this year:

www.businessinsider.com/ios-android-shopping-traffic-2013-11

As for what Wall Street and developers think, here’s a nice, tidy article—also from today—that shows at least one analyst believes that Apple is on track to hit $700 per share again, while also noting that iOS app revenue is probably twice that of Android app revenue, despite more Android apps being downloaded:

www.valuewalk.com/2013/12/apple-inc-aapl-to-hit-700-again/

This far greater app revenue, along with lack of fragmentation, is why iOS remains the favorite among developers. That reinforces Apple’s iOS ecosystem, which in turn fuels more sales of iOS devices.

So basically Apple is one company with a few iPhones and a few iPads facing off against the entire army of Android OEMs and their countless Android phones and tablets, and somehow Apple remains the most valuable company on the planet, with the most popular smartphone and the most popular tablet. Developers have always known this, and Wall Street will finally wise up as well.

wab95

@mrmwebmax

Very comprehensively articulated, sir. The reference citations are impressive, and a substantive rebuff to uninformed opinion and healthy food for the open mind.

mrmwebmax

+

Thanks @wab95. Not sure I’ll ever understand this anti-Apple mindset that appears in posts and pundit articles, that for Apple to be considered a success its platforms must be #1 in market share else Apple is doooooooomed. Because this mindset doesn’t seem to apply anywhere else.

Apple is a premium brand. Likewise, Rolex is a premium brand. Does Rolex have the market share of Timex? Or Casio? Probably not. Yet no one screams that Rolex is doomed.

Also, when was the last time an automotive journalist wrote: “Bad news for Italy today. A random observation of US highways showed that the bulk of motorists are driving Hondas, Fords, and Chevys, while few if any choose a Ferrari or Lamborghini. Clearly, Italy’s exotic car manufacturers are dooooooomed.”

Yes, the market share issue was a real issue in the 1990s, when Mac market share plummeted and developers abandoned the platform like rats on a sinking ship. But this isn’t the 1990s. (If it were, we’d be having this conversation on CompuServe or AOL via dial-up.) And iOS vs. Android isn’t Mac vs. PC, no mater how many people and pundits choose to see it that way.

Any developer for mobile wants to make money selling apps. Where’s the money? iOS. iOS users buy more apps than Android users, so that—along with lack of fragmentation—makes iOS the more attractive platform for developers. Android users could outnumber iOS users ten to one, but if you’re a developer, those additional Android users don’t mean squat if they aren’t going to pay for apps. The same goes for third-party accessory manufacturers.

If, as “Steffen Jobbs” claims:

The bottom line is Android is the preferred OS of the entire world because Android devices cost a lot less than Apple devices or any other OS devices and nothing else matters.

Then it follows that Android users are looking to spend the least amount of money as possible. That does not bode well for Android app developers or third-party accessory manufacturers. That’s why iOS has, and will maintain, a thriving ecosystem of apps and accessories.

Then there’s the enterprise, where iOS absolutely crushes Android. Not hardly Mac vs. Windows in enterprise, right? I work in an IT department now, and everyone in the department has an iPhone, while a number have iPads, and one has a Surface Pro. Android is all but non-existant. (Truth be told, a few non-IT coworkers have Android.) But again, iOS vs. Android in enterprise today is about as far from Mac vs. Windows in enterprise in the 1990s as you can get.

As for Wall Street? I predict it will come around, and Apple’s stock price will again hit $700. Time will tell, but I doubt Tim Cook is losing any sleep over either share price or iOS/Android market share. And if he is losing sleep, he can either count sheep, or count the number of dollars Apple is raking in during this holiday season. smile

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