iOS 5: New iPhone, iPad Setup

| TMO Quick Tip

Apple turned the iPhone, iPad and iPod touch into stand-alone computers with the release of iOS 5 because you no longer need to connect new devices to a computer for activation. Instead, there’s a simple walkthrough you’ll go through with new devices or devices that have been restored to factory settings.

Here’s what you’ll see the first time you hit the power button on a new iPhone, iPad or iPod touch running iOS 5:

Enable Location Services

Enable Location Services iOS 5 makes it very clear that some apps can track where you are. It even gives you the choice to enable or disable the feature as part of the setup process. You need to decide whether or not to enable Location Services before the setup assistant will let you continue. If you change your mind later, you can always enable or disable Location Services from the Settings app.

Wi-Fi Setup

Wi-Fi Networks You can choose a Wi-Fi network to join during the setup process. You’ll want to, otherwise features like Wi-Fi syncing and iCloud won’t be available to you.

Apple ID

Apple ID You need an Apple ID to purchase songs and videos from the iTunes Store, apps from the App Store, and books from iBookstore. You’ll also use your Apple ID for features like FaceTime and Game Center. If you don’t already have an Apple ID and don’t feel like setting one up now, you can skip this step and create one later.

Birthday

Birthday Why does Apple want you to provide your birthday? They say it’s to retrieve your password should you ever forget it, and to “determine appropriate services.”

Setup Finished

That’s a Wrap That’s it. Now your iPhone, iPad or iPod touch is set up and ready to go. Just tap Start Using iPad — assuming you just set up your iPad, of course — and get to work. Or Angry Birds. Whatever.

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Comments

BurmaYank

Why does Apple want you to provide your birthday? They say it?s to retrieve your password should you ever forget it, and to ?determine appropriate services.?

I used to give my birthday as “Feb 29” for these logon queries, but the problem with that is remembering which leapyear I happened to have picked as my birthyear for that particular logon, making twice as many things needing to be remembered for logging-on (PW plus year).  So I’ve pretty much surrendered and used my real birthday lately (come what may!).

Brian

Hello - thanks for this preview. I was wondering if you had any insight into whether MobileMe syncing will continue (i.e., calendars, address book contacts). Is there a place you enter your MobileMe credentials, or does your iTunes account sign in become your new MobileMe sign in?

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