Microsoft Office For Mac 2011: Free Trial Announced

| Product News

On Tuesday, the MacBU team at Microsoft released the Office for Mac 2011 trial edition. You can test the full version, Home and Business edition, free for 30 days.

You’ll need to register for the trial with some brief personal information before you download.

In the MacBU’s blog, Pat Fox, Senior Director of Product Management, Office for Mac, said: “If you’re still thinking about Office 2011, I’m happy to announce we now have a full trial available at www.microsoft.com/mac/trial, free to use for 30-days after download. We know it’s important for some of you to be able to test out new features. For those that will be trying the suite for the first time, we hope you enjoy some of the new items – Outlook for Mac, new co-authoring tools, Excel’s Sparklines, Dynamic Reorder in Word & PowerPoint, and more.”

There is a very good FAQ that answers customer questions, including how to upgrade to the paid edition when the free trial is over and the handling of Outlook if you only purchase the Home and Student edition.

Comments

BurmaYank

What really sucks for me about this new Office is that the $149.99 Home/Student (i.e.- low-end) version no longer includes any email browser (i.e.- no Entourage or Outlook Express any longer with it); you must now instead fork over $279.99 for the whole Home & Business package just to get integrated emailing included.

Lee Dronick

What really sucks for me about this new Office is that the $149.99 Home/Student (i.e.- low-end) version no longer includes any email browser

I wonder if they think that on the Mac the majority of Home and Student Office owners are using web based email or OS Mail.

Ross Edwards

@BurmaYank—So you’re one of the six people out there that isn’t using a web-based mail reader?

Lee Dronick

So you?re one of the six people out there that isn?t using a web-based mail reader?

I am one of the six people that can outwit setting up an account in Mail. smile

BurmaYank

@BurmaYank?So you?re one of the six people out there that isn?t using a web-based mail reader?

Yup.  Not using one very much anymore - I’ve almost given up using my MobileMe mail reader in favor of Apple’s Mail App. 

About 2 years ago, I had happily settled on using only Entourage X & 2004 (after previously having gotten along mostly with just Earthlink’s, GMail’s and/or Comcast’s web-based mail readers, which were so grossly inferior to Entourage in so many ways), but then I somehow wound up messing up my Entourage 2004 Contacts database (birthdays & other metadata got hopelessly misfiled amongst all the Contacts, thanks to sync’ing errors with my Palm Treo 700p using the Missing Sync), so I temporarily switched it all to Apple’s Mail & Address Book Apps until such time as my Entourage Contacts database-repair project had been completed.  I am still awaiting that moment to switch back, so I can finally stop having to rely on Apple’s 3rd-rate Calendar and 2nd-rate Address Book & Mail apps. Meanwhile, I don’t trust ThunderBird, and find OmniWeb’s emailer mostly quite inferior to Entourage in so many ways, so here I sit.

But, no - I can’t imagine being anything but very constantly frustrated with any web-based mail reader - even with MobileMe’s, and especially with those other extremely limited (crippled) web-based readers like GMail’s, Yahoo’s, Earthlink’s, GMail’s, Comcast’s, MSN’s etc.

Lee Dronick

But, no - I can?t imagine being anything but very constantly frustrated with any web-based mail reader - even with MobileMe, and especially with those other extremely limited (crippled) web-based readers like GMail?s, Yahoo?s etc.

God, yes! Very limited. Web based email seems popular with my itinerant friends who access their email at the library or where ever they can get on a PC.

ctopher

So here are 3 of the 6 (I’m 1) who prefers an e-mail client. I’ve tried a bunch and while Mail.app has it’s drawbacks, it still works the best for me.

We have people here using Thunderbird and they really like it. Of course many outlook users too, from what I hear, outlook on the mac is pretty good, but I can’t abide the price.

bottom line

You can test the full version, Home and Business edition, free for 30 days.

Making Office worth it’s price for 30 days.

Apple needs to take the kid gloves off iWork and challenge MS directly.

Lee Dronick

Making Office worth it?s price for 30 days.

It isn’t bad, pretty good in fact.

I think that Apple keeps Pages and Numbers hobbled on purpose. Kind of a Sword of Damocles to keep them developing for the Mac.

wab95

I think that Apple keeps Pages and Numbers hobbled on purpose. Kind of a Sword of Damocles to keep them developing for the Mac

Maybe less of Sword of Damocles than a business associate with a loaded gun.

I?ve tried a bunch and while Mail.app has it?s drawbacks, it still works the best for me

I too now use Mail.app almost exclusively. I used to use Outlook Express, back in the day, but found Entourage an anaemic caricature of its Windows counterpart. Happy with Mail.app in the high-end workspace.

I am still awaiting that moment to switch back, so I can finally stop having to rely on Apple?s 3rd-rate Calendar and 2nd-rate Address Book & Mail apps

I switched to BusyCal some time ago, and have been happy with it, especially now that it is CalDav enabled. It is not a true workflow and project planner, but it suffices as a calendar and to-do list, and I use it to make notes on conference calls.

Dean Lewis

Count me in as one of the six or so. Add to that I only gave up PowerMail a little over a year ago and began using Apple’s Mail. I didn’t want to give in to the stupid graphical HTML mail bullcrap. But, it finally assimilated me, too—I gave up the fight and have to see everyone’s stupid funny picture collections that have been forwarded to a thousand poor souls and idiotic fonts they don’t know they’re sending.

Lee Dronick

I gave up the fight and have to see everyone?s stupid funny picture collections that have been forwarded to a thousand poor souls and idiotic fonts they don?t know they?re sending.

I often feel that he Forward feature needs to be removed from mail clients and webmail pages. Copy and Paste if the message needs to be sent to someone else. Also remove the ability to to put multiple addressees in To and Cc, make them go into Bcc.

mhikl

Apple needs to take the kid gloves off iWork and challenge MS directly.

What is it that a general guy needs Office for that iWorks doesn’t include?

I sometimes open up Excel 2004 when I want to do a quick run at some figures because I know it so well, but for the most part Numbers is my game and I prefer the features in Pages over Word and it’s spell correction so much more. I have Office 2007 but have never got round to learning it as iWorks meets my personal needs so well.

Sir Henry, could you explain the hobbled thing a bit. Your point about keeping M$ interested in developing sounds right on, but not being a business user of Office, I haven’t the understanding or the time to figger this out on my own. I’m too busy figuring out ways to bash Bosco.

Cheers.

Lee Dronick

Sir Henry, could you explain the hobbled thing a bit. Your point about keeping M$ interested in developing sounds right on,

My thinking is that both Adobe and MicroSoft both make a lot of money from Mac users. I see in iWork, and even Preview, a foundation for Creative Suite and Office killers. Apple doesn’t make them more powerful for political/strategic purposes. I would bet that in their cupboard Apple some impressive programs that they could march out should Adobe and/or MicroSoft decamp.

Terrin

Yes, but does Apple really want to intimidate Microsoft to dump Office for the Mac? The reality is many Mac users for compatibility reasons rely on Word and Excel. When Apple killed Corel, it gave up on Office Suite dominance. To be serious such a suite would have to be cross platform, and as most people know Apple uses software to sell hardware. Developing for Windows would be counterproductive.

Apple doesn?t make them more powerful for political/strategic purposes. I would bet that in their cupboard Apple some impressive programs that they could march out should Adobe and/or MicroSoft decamp.

mhikl

I would bet that in their cupboard Apple some impressive programs that they could march out should Adobe and/or MicroSoft decamp.

I suspect you are correct in your thinking, young Sir. Apple is strategy incarnate and as it took some time for Apple to finally pull the lever on the scaffold Adobe (flash) built for itself, M$ and its Office offerings are probably in its sights. “It’ll be a Yank Bar-B-Q”, to quote Dennis Lee.

And you are also correct, Terrin. But a time will come when the iPad is so dominant that a carefully crafted iWorks might make it necessary for M$ to build such compatibility. “One of the most ironic things about capitalism is that the capitalist will sell you the rope to hang himself with.” to quote Michael Moore.

And another great soothsayer says: “The time will come when M$ will crawl back into the slime from whence it burst forth.” to quote mhikl. “And I means this in the most caring way.” to quote Maud, aka Beatrice Arthur.

BurmaYank

“I would bet that in their cupboard Apple some impressive programs that they could march out should Adobe and/or MicroSoft decamp.”

Yes; to wit:

To this day, even though Palm DeskTop has not been modified in any significant way from the form it had before Palm bought it from Apple/Claris in the latter 1990’s, it is IMO, still to this day, a much more powerful & ergonomically useful address book/calendar/task manager/notepad than anything else Apple has offered us since that time before OS X first came out (with the possible exception of CyberDog).  And I also seem to recall that Now-Up-To-Date also pretty much “borrowed” lock-stock&barrel; from that same suite of Apple’s.

mhikl

still to this day, a much more powerful & ergonomically useful address book/calendar/task manager/notepad

Exactly, BY. I still have my Palm TX and and with Docs2Go and some other purchased app I could DL and read on line news. Has a music player of sorts. With it I ruled my world with my fingertips. The learning curve was not bad.

But therein lies the difference between Apple and Other. I waited with anticipation for Cobalt (OS 6) but Palm never advanced their handheld but went to phones instead. I stepped on mine and by luck got a second one so cheap from Office Depot when they were dumping them. Then got the first Touch for Xmas. I still bring the old TX out and am amazed that there are aspects of it I admire more than some of the same on the Touch.

Had Palm any vision, the world of Handhelds and Mobile might have been a different history today. Where Apple saw connectivity and integration, Palm saw a device past its prime and a new one with a single purpose. Where Apple dared to think Different, Palm saw competition and got scared because it couldn’t think outside the box.

Another aside to your point: Instead of buying the first iMac (USB & Ethernet only) my dad bought me the Molar AIO which had SCSI and a video input and output card. I believe it came with OS 8 and was upgradeable to X 2. What a workhorse. But the thing is, Apple supports, Palm aborts. And therein lies all the difference. I still have the old monster.

Par usual, I’m off topic. But it was fun running memory lane.

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