OS X Mountain Lion: Apple Lists Compatible Macs

| Mountain Lion

With the release of OS X Mountain Lion fast approaching, Apple is making it clear exactly which Mac models can make the move to the new operating system version. If your Mac was built before there’s a good chance it isn’t Mountain Lion compatible, and any Mac from before mid 2007 is left out in the cold.

Mountain Lion will support many, but not all, 64-bit MacsMountain Lion will support many, but not all, 64-bit Macs

According to Apple’s Mountain Lion upgrade page, these are the oldest Macs that can make the move:

  • iMac (Mid 2007 or newer)
  • MacBook (Late 2008 Aluminum, or Early 2009 or newer)
  • MacBook Pro (Mid/Late 2007 or newer)
  • MacBook Air (Late 2008 or newer)
  • Mac mini (Early 2009 or newer)
  • Mac Pro (Early 2008 or newer)
  • Xserve (Early 2009)

While Mountain Lion is a 64-bit operating system, not all 64-bit capable Macs can run the new OS. The reasoning behind that, Ars Technica speculates, is that the unsupported 64-bit Macs use graphics cards with 32-bit drivers, and those aren’t Mountain Lion compatible.

In other words, Apple is requiring Macs with Intel Core 2, 64-bit processors and video cards that support 64-bit drivers to run Mountain Lion.

Apple plans to ship Mountain Lion some time in July and will offer the OS as an upgrade for OS X Snow Leopard and later for US$19.99 as a download from the Mac App Store.

Comments

WillioamLH

According to Apple’s website, it will be $19.99, NOT $29.99

Bryan Chaffin

Thanks, WillioamLH. The article has been corrected.

Greycat

While Mountain Lion is a 64-bit operating system, not all 64-bit capable Macs can run the new OS. The reasoning behind that, Ars Technica speculates, is that the unsupported 64-bit Macs use graphics cards with 32-bit drivers, and those aren?t Mountain Lion compatible.

So, in the case of an original (2007) Mac Pro, will it be possible to replace the graphics card and driver? Or is there something inherent in the architecture that would make this ineffective?

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