Research Report Details How Customers are Using iPad

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Resolve Market Research has published a comprehensive study that examines how Apple customers are using their iPad. Amongst the results: customers don’t buy the iPad for games, but that changes later. Also, they are far less likely to buy a dedicated E-reader after purchasing an iPad.

The research, released through mashable.com asked customers which of the following devices they would not buy after owning an iPad. The top two items are an E-reader and a portable gaming device.

  1. E-reader - 49%
  2. Portable Gaming Device - 38%
  3. Netbook/Laptop - 32%
  4. MP3 Player - 29%
  5. Gaming Console - 27%
  6. MID - 24 %
  7. Smartphone - 22%

Makers of E-reader should be worried, the report says, and points out the recent price slashing by Amazon (Kindle) and Barnes & Noble (Nook). “Even at $200, the value proposition for an e-reader versus an iPad is tough to overcome.”

Perhaps the most surprising result was that 37 percent of customers planning to buy an iPad said it will be their first Apple product.

Finally, the iPad is viewed, for now, as an expensive toy.

 

“According to Resolve, 55% of iPad owners or would-be owners see the device as a very expensive toy, or luxury item. It’s not a necessary device to have in your daily life, although it can replace a number of other gadgets or products. Still, that functionality can largely be reproduced (albeit with a less experience, in many cases) by things that many users already own.”

 

These results suggest that the initial euphoria over the iPad results, later, in more practical considerations as customers realize what they can really do with the device. In time, even more imaginative uses will likely come to light.

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Comments

think

?According to (market research), 55% of (...) owners or would-be owners see the device as a very expensive toy, or luxury item. It?s not a necessary device to have in your daily life, although it can replace a number of other gadgets or products. Still, that functionality can largely be reproduced (albeit with a less experience, in many cases) by things that many users already own.?

iPad 2010 or the desktop computer circa 1977?

The iPad needs a VisiCalc to kick it into the true mainstream. smile

Constable Odo

I thought all Apple products were referred to as expensive toys by every non-Apple person.  That’s why Apple stock has always been poorly regarded as being a long-term stable stock.  Apple share price is supposedly based on the whims of big spenders buying useless products.  I’m having a problem defining “toy” when it comes to consumer devices.  Apparently, any product that comes from Apple can’t be used for meaningful work which would seem to be rather odd being that they’re computing devices.

Fred Lanam

No Apple products for me until they get rid of their Big Brother attitude when it comes to approving apps.

No Flash = No iPad for me.

Steve Jobs=Big Brother

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