What No One has Dared Think About Apple’s Data Center

“When you are solving a difficult problem, re-frame the problem so that your solution helps you learn faster.” — Aza Raskin

 

There is a classic puzzle about a fellow in a rowboat who is rowing down a river and drops his hat overboard. The puzzle involves calculating how long it takes him to turn around and row back to the hat floating in the water. The problem is a lot easier to solve if one changes reference frame and works from the guy in the boat instead of from the shoreline view. It’s an example of how a change of reference frame is often useful for solving a problem. Another example comes from physics. Some problems in electromagnetism are a lot easier to solve in spherical coordinates. In other words, recasting the problem to make it easier to solve is a helpful technique. The quote above for this article extends that idea to not only re-framing, but also doing it in such a way that we learn faster.

It’s that recasting that I want to talk about with respect to Apple’s data centers.

A lot has been written about Apple’s new data center in North Carolina, but no one has been able to put together a coherent picture of what it all means. Most articles wax into lofty notions of a massive data center to deliver a better MobileMe experience, untethered iPads synced to the cloud instead of a PC — or a massive movie databank. And leave it at that.

Apple NC data center

Apple’s North Carolina Data Center

The problem arises when we start to formulate an idea about just exactly how the data center (and possibly more like the NC center worldwide) would be utilized. For example, if one takes all the assumptions about Apple’s DNA, it’s easier to re-frame the question about what Apple trying to achieve.

Let’s start with some easy analysis about Apple’s competition, Netflix. If Apple intends to out-Netflix the Netflix Corp., then how will Apple convince Hollywood executives to give them rights to a massive movie archive as Netflix CEO Red Hastings has done? (We know that Hollywood executives are alarmed at the prospect of Apple obtaining control over movies in the way Apple seized control of music.) We also know that Hollywood and the networks don’t want to upset the apple cart with the lucrative deals they have with cable and satellite carriers.

We suspect that buying Netflix, with its huge inventory of plastic discs and likely exclusive contracts with Hollywood, isn’t Apple’s style. (That is, Netflix’s contracts might not be inheritable if the company is bought.)

In fact, everywhere we turn, it seems like the problem is insurmountable and in desperate need of reformulation. The whole scenario suggests that we’re asking the wrong questions, making the wrong assumptions, and, worse, not analyzing the problem that Apple faces and imagining a next generation solution.

Seeking an Analogy

A good analogy comes from looking at the music industry and the development of the Apple iPod. The music industry in the 1990s was going strong and was all too happy to sell complete albums on a plastic CD. And we know how much they charged for that piece of plastic which forces us to buy all the songs in the album. It also forced customers into ridiculous collections, bookcases, boomboxes, and awkward CD players. Apple came along with a 140 gram iPod that could hold 1,000 songs and that changed the game completely. The labels’ obsession with money and the status quo blinded them to the next technological step, which was user choice, playlists, and massive storage in your pocket.

Asking a New Set of Questions

Let’s ask some new questions and see where it goes.

1. What if Apple’s analysis of the TV industry has led to the same kind of ground breaking, imaginative solution?

2. What temptations could Steve Jobs lay before Hollywood and the networks that would allow them to maintain the kind of control they want yet lure them into experimenting with Apple at a higher level?

3. How could a massive data center become, essentially, the next (super) iPod?

4. Apple recently made headlines by purchasing 12 petabytes of storage. One of our readers calculated that 12 petabytes would take up about 180 sq ft of floor space. Apple’s data center has more than 500,000 sq ft. We’re talking exabytes of possible expansion. More as storage continues to use less space over the lifetime of the data center. What service could use that kind of storage?

Some Assumptions

Let’s summarize our reasonable assumptions about Apple’s situation.

1. Apple doesn’t want to buy Netflix because it doesn’t want to inherit a mail order business of plastic discs. It may not be able to inherit the movie rights*.

2. Apple doesn’t want to buy an ISP like Time Warner or Comcast and inherit the lousy politics, bureaucracy and customer service reputation of these companies.

3. Apple can’t reasonably replace the broadband infrastructure currently in place by telcos and cable companies. Apple would have to spends hundreds of billions, as AT&T has, to build a new, national wireless network. That’s not a good use of Apple’s money.

4. The Apple TV has taught Apple a lot about the home TV industry. It remained a hobby because Apple hadn’t solved the basic problem at hand.

5. Apple doesn’t want to own the newspaper, magazine, book, music and movie industry. Instead, they want a 30 percent cut, a piece of the action, on the delivery of all that content.

6. By the end of 2011, Apple will have 50 million TV sets, called iPads, in customer homes.

Some Guesses

The questions above are a completely different set of questions than we’ve have seen asked, and while we don’t have all the answers, we’ll try to make some educated guesses based on the questions and the assumptions.

First, we note that here are too many fragmented delivery mechanisms owned by different players and which use different technical delivery mechanisms. And each has its own unique library and UI for delivering content. Recall how, in the early 1990s, many of us had cassete players, CD players and VCRs. Now, we have DVDs/Blu-ray, Internet (Hulu, Roku, Apple TV, Boxee, Google) and cable/satellite. Vested interests lure us into buying physical media that’s constantly being made obsolete. Vested interests are keeping the industry from thinking about how to deliver all this content is a new, more convenient and coherent way.

Our chief complaint is that American households are constantly changing between these delivery mechanisms to get a better price for bundled Internet service plus content as they also wrestle with new hardware and pray for better customer service. It would be better to take content out of the equation and reduce the carriers to fast pipes by offering customers a superior content purchase and management experience.

In other words, the problem is not the content. Many movies and TV shows are terrific — once they get delivered. The problem is all the fuss we have to go through to get that content delivered (and stored, and backed up). What we need is a better channel. (For example, who uses Epix? Who has even heard of it?) What Apple could be building is the channel everyone wants to be on.

So, like the iPod, it seems that the key to all this is a simple, easy to use, dependable, customer friendly channel that delivers the content that Hollywood wants to deliver. To do that, Apple needs a modern, capable data center.

For example, here’s how content delivery happens for many people now:

[Comcast (etc), DIRECTV (etc)] -> DVR -> HDTV

Here’s how Apple is slowly introducing an evolutionary new channel. Each step is part of Apple’s plan, but it’s been one step at a time.

Mac (iTunes) -> Apple TV 1G -> HDTV
Apple Cloud -> Apple TV 2G -> HDTV
Apple Cloud -> iOS device (AirPlay) -> Apple TV 2G -> HDTV
Apple Cloud -> iOS device (AirPlay) -> (optionally) HDTV

iPad 2

The last step suggests the elimination of the Apple TV, and that’s why we’ve been hearing about Apple making AirPlay available to the TV makers. (Even so, Apple can keep selling the Apple TV 2G as part of a stopgap household solution.) This evolution could also explain why we’ve heard rumors about Apple making its own TV: to seed customers with an AirPlay capable TV to trigger interest in the technology, not to globally compete with, say, Panasonic and Sony.

The overall idea here is to make the user experience with its family of iOS devices so superior that customers will naturally want to opt for the Apple channel rather than the old, obsolete technologies the cable companies have been delivering. After all, these companies have been modestly successful delivering bandwidth, but have been terrible at delivering mobile technology devices with modern UIs. With hundreds of millions of iOS devices in consumer hands in the near future, customers will naturally opt for these devices rather than the sorry, disjointed services, UI and equipment the cable companies have been able to muster.

Apple hopes the content delivery services of the bandwidth suppliers will dry up and blow away thanks to customer demand for Apple iOS devices and technologies. At the very least, Apple will surge to the top when it comes to customer choice for delivery, making it very difficult for Hollywood and the studios to avoid doing a staggeringly large business with Apple.

The associated step is to point out to Hollywood and the studios that links to this content are everywhere. Every movie, every song, every book has a URL. The embedding of those URLs is everywhere in the web. Apple has 200 million customers with credit cards on file who are always just two clicks away from buying content from their iPhones and iPads, etc. That’s the leverage Steve Jobs will have, along with the insame popularity of the iPad, to lure content developers onto the Apple channel.

Apple will have bypassed the content from the cable companies without building its own network. And Apple gets 30 percent of all the action.

______

* It’s been pointed out that Netflix actually has the rights to stream only a modest percentage of its disc library.

Comments

Mike Weasner

I don’t know what Apple plans to do with that new data center but I do wonder about their off-site backup storage plan for 12 petabytes of data.

John Martellaro

The facility is so large, mirroring the data at the other end of the building might be considered “off-site” !

Mike Weasner

Yes, it is a large facility.  So were some of the tornadoes that went through NC recently.

Nemo

Messrs. Martellaro and Christianson:  Your article is an insight that both makes sense and makes sense of a lot of what we see from Apple, so it not only may be correct; if Apple isn’t doing what you hypothesize, perhaps it should be.

Davido

I am glad you have taken this new approach to the NC site. I’ve been immensely dissatisfied with all the discussion about the site that I have read. My knee-jerk reaction is to hope for a cable-type service for a monthly fee but even that is likely too simplistic for what is going on. We have to assume the insane, rather than the mundane. We are, after all, talking about Apple. It will be so obvious, we will all smack our foreheads and say, “Of course”, but it will no one will have tried it in this way. Simplicity, after all, is insanity for all those looking for complexity.

Lee Dronick

Yes, it is a large facility.  So were some of the tornadoes that went through NC recently.

It is possible that there is a big vault in there. One that could withstand a tornado, a hurricane, or even an EMP.

John Martellaro

Davido: Thanks for your insightful and gracious feedback.

palenoue

If I were a high-ranking official at Apple I’d be having fun with all of this speculation.  I’d have trucks delivering boxes labeled “Army Surplus Paper Readers,” lions and tigers delivered in cages where the covers “accidentally” fell off as curious onlookers took pictures on their cell phones.  Maybe hire Cirque de Soleil to dress up as ninjas and practice new routines in the parking lot as the Google Street car drives by.

Then I’d sit back and laugh at all the wild speculation wink

YodaMac

I see most of what you’re saying, but it all still seems to “stall” when you consider that most of the content Apple would want to deliver through it’s service is owned by Hollywood companies - who are in turn owned by the very cable & satellite companies your premise makes obsolete.

Why would they every let Apple distribute it?
What am I missing?

1truBob

The facility is so large, mirroring the data at the other end of the building might be considered ?off-site? !

No. Any single facility, for any purposes or services I’ve seen or discussed, requires a twin, or triplets, on (an)other continent(s). Doesn’t matter how many power feeds it has, how many network connections from different providers and different directions. This is WAY too big to fail; and any single facility, no matter how redundancy is built in, is by definition a single-point-of-failure. So the facility itself needs redundancy.

The one exception would be if this facility is already the redundancy—if it is to be the central backup for all the various datacenters Apple now uses around the world. But it’s too big even for that.

I think you’re right about needing to shift the frame of reference to see this, but I don’t think you’ve gone far enough. That said, I’ve nowhere to stand to see any further.

DrShakagee

Why would they every let Apple distribute it?

Isn’t Jobs the single biggest share holder in Disney or something? If Apple got Disney movies, and ESPN live sports it could be enough to establish it as a viable option for consumers.

wab95

Excellent situation analysis and projection. Your analogy, questions and assumptions are reasonable and consistent with what is known. Your guesses venture into some refreshingly new territory, while staying grounded in precedent.

I agree that a key objective of whatever Apple are doing is leveraging its current iOS and customer positional strength into an even stronger consumer experience. The consumer is the target.

The question is the identity of the partners, if any, with whom Apple will provide that enhanced experience and it what directions. The size of the facility strongly argues that this is about more than just library storage, and the entertainment industry would be pound-foolish, at some point, not to strike a better collaboration with Apple.

Accepting that Apple may not release all their surprises at once, OI am looking forward to seeing how this plays out.

daddy

WRT the hat and the boat problem:  You simply tack back and forth and let the hat catch up to you, which shouldn’t take too long since the hat’s traveling at more or less the same speed as the boat.

Another example of point of reference might be:  Why don’t aircraft flying from Miami to Santiago, Chile, fly due south since Santiago is somewhat east of Miami and will rotate westward as the plane is flying south.  Instead, airplanes fly in a SES (southeast by south) direction to land in Santiago.

mbaDad

Why would they every let Apple distribute it?
What am I missing?

What you are missing is that this old establishment is very top heavy and ripe for a toppling.  Just like we are seeing new media replace newspapers with there expensive presses, paper, buildings etc., we are going to see new companies spring up making content for online only distribution.  Indeed Netflix is moving in the direction of making their own content as we type.  It is so obvious, I can only believe other wealthy people are thinking of starting their own content houses as well.

furbies

It is possible that there is a big vault in there. One that could withstand a tornado, a hurricane, or even an EMP.

Maybe the vault is for Steve Job’s “Personal Reality Distortion Field” when he’s not actively using it ?

Lee Dronick

Maybe the vault is for Steve Job?s ?Personal Reality Distortion Field? when he?s not actively using it ?

The building is only 500,000 square feet.

Steve Webb

Steve Rosenbaum suggested that Apple might be building its own version of youtube.com. He started his piece by describing the problems involved in making money from short video clips, using MTV as an example. He claims youtube experienced the same problems, and is moving toward the same solution. He suggested a void is forming that Apple can occupy if it moves quickly.

He got me thinking that Apple may be able to avoid the MTV problem, because Apple has been beta testing an alternative revenue source: iAds.

Imagine an Youtube like website or App with iAd style banners at the bottom, and a 70/30 split between Apple and the clip producer. Imagine the horde of GarageBand “developers”, the iMovie developers, iPhoto, even Brushes….

America’s funniest home videos, Star Search, etc. - now there is an App for that.

Lee Dronick

Looking at the aerial photo of the facility, what are those two cylinders? They look like tanks. If so could they be for fuel, water, some sort of coolant?

How does this compare with data centers?

daddy

@sir harry:  Maybe those are grain elevators or stills or massive disk drives a la the IBM RAMAC (see fourth photo here: http://www.computerhistory.org/restorations/

iJack

Another example of point of reference might be:  Why don?t aircraft flying from Miami to Santiago, Chile, fly due south since Santiago is somewhat east of Miami and will rotate westward as the plane is flying south.  Instead, airplanes fly in a SES (southeast by south) direction to land in Santiago.

Nope.  The route is determined by using a Great Circle.  I was going to explain it myself, but I couldn’t better the Wikipedia explanation.

“For any two points on the surface of a sphere there is a great circle through the two points. The minor arc of a great circle between two points is the shortest surface-path between them.”

All commercial aircraft and ships navigate using Great Circle routes for this reason.

Lee Dronick

Maybe those are grain elevators or stills or massive disk drives

Too short for grain silos, not copper enough for a still, could be big disk drives. Maybe they are capstans for a big tape drive.

Seriously, I don’t think that they don’t have the right shape and size for cooling towers. Maybe through, maybe.

I followed the link in this story to datacenterknowledge.com and it sounds like Apple has plans for another building of about the same size at that site; They took out building permits.

daddy

Nope.  The route is determined by using a Great Circle.  I was going to explain it myself, but I couldn?t better the Wikipedia explanation.

?For any two points on the surface of a sphere there is a great circle through the two points. The minor arc of a great circle between two points is the shortest surface-path between them.?

All commercial aircraft and ships navigate using Great Circle routes for this reason.

Actually that’s only partly true.

What I wanted to get across is that if you head due south from Miami on a GC route, you’ll wind up in the Pacific Ocean.  I was wondering why the rotation westward of the earth wasn’t a factor, which would mean Santiago would rotate to a point where the aircraft would be.  The answer to that conundrum is that the aircraft is part of the earth system, including the atmosphere, and you can’t fly south hoping that a particular city will rotate to your intended ron-day-vous (I can’t spell it!).  However, a ballistic craft would indeed fly to where the target city will be, not where it is.

Rather the aircraft zigzags in a generally SES direction.  Due to a variety of factors, you can’t fly this route Miami - Santiago) in a true GC any more than you can when flying from SFO to east Asia (has to do with being over water - you are allowed 90 - 120 minutes from land, depending on the aircraft, number of engines, etc.).  The best GC route I’ve flown is SFO to anywhere in Europe.

But thanks for mentioning the WP article.

Lee Dronick

daddy said:Another example of point of reference might be:  Why don?t aircraft flying from Miami to Santiago, Chile, fly due south since Santiago is somewhat east of Miami and will rotate westward as the plane is flying south.  Instead, airplanes fly in a SES (southeast by south) direction to land in Santiago.
Nope.  The route is determined by using a Great Circle.  I was going to explain it myself, but I couldn?t better the Wikipedia explanation.

I was in ship navigation when I was in the Navy. Santiago is not due south of Miami, they are not on the same meridian/longitude line. Close though, but at that distance the great circle route makes a difference in time and fuel. There are also side winds to take into consideration.

Looks like you could fly due south from Boston to Santiago. All meridians are great circles, the only latitude line that is a great circle is the Equator.

Here is a good bar bet for you. When transiting the Panama Canal from the Atlantic to the Pacific are you traveling to the west? Take a look at the map, the Pacific end is actually a few miles to the east of the Atlantic end. So you steer southeast to get to the west.

daddy

Too short for grain silos, not copper enough for a still, could be big disk drives. Maybe they are capstans for a big tape drive.

Capstand indeed!  I think you’re on to something here.  In fact, the entire structure (somewhat) resembles a tape cassette.

Is copper still the primary tubing used in stills?  Everything I see in construction these days uses PVC of some kind.  I halfway expect to see PVC used as rebar any day now!

daddy

Santiago is not due south of Miami, they are not on the same meridian/longitude line.

Exactly my point.  I was doing a thought experiment in which Santiago rotates westward and will be in the spot due south of where Miami was when the plane took off.  Rotation, my friend, rotation.

This is all very clear in my own mid but I’m having a difficult time presenting it so others understand what I think I’m trying to say, which is why I flunked out of Teacher’s College ages ago.

Lee Dronick

s copper still the primary tubing used in stills?  Everything I see in construction these days uses PVC of some kind.  I halfway expect to see PVC used as rebar any day now!

I think most of the big outfits now use stainless steel, copper is getting too expensive.

I suppose that you could use resin filled fiberglass or something like that as rebar. It is probably one of those things where the building codes still call for rusty steel rebar. My house was built in 1973 and has copper water supply pipes, but ABS plastic drain pipes. A few years later they built homes with ABS supply pipe and they were a problem with pressure blowouts.

As to the rotation of the Earth effecting the course an airplane would steer. Yes, the corliolis effect is a factor, but probably not much for an airplane that is more effected by side winds, avoiding storms, no fly zones and other considerations. It is certainly a factor in long ranger gunnery, missiles and such.

Tardis

This article and the one by Steve Rosenbaum are the first real attempts to understand why Apple should want to build such a huge datacentre. Even more curious, it looks like Apple is going ahead with a second facility at the same site, which makes no sense in terms of redundancy.

If Adam Christianson, John Martellaro and Steve Rosenbaum are thinking along the right lines, Apple is poised to expand the reach of iTunes video to compete with conventional broadcast, cable, rental and other internet services.

And if so, the really interesting question is why this requires not one but two really huge datacentres in the same place. The only answer that I can come up with is that these are like a Time Capsule for a string of datacentres that will actually be delivering the video content around the world. These are not the datacentres that will be delivering the AppleTV content for viewers here in Japan, for example, these are the BACKUP for the datacentres that will be delivering the AppleTV content for viewers all around the world.

Think Different ......

zewazir

Motion, as Einstein pointed out, is relative.  An airplane flies through air, which (for the most part and ignoring various winds) shares the Earth’s rotation. It is all part of one big system in motion about Earth’s axis. The aircraft does not need to worry about the Earth’s change in position in it’s orbit around the sun, either - a change in location far greater over time than the Earth’s spin can account for. This is because the aircraft is part of the entire system moving around the sun. Likewise, the aircraft does not need worry about motion around the Earth’s axis, because the aircraft is also part of that same system (the surface of the Earth and atmosphere) which moves around the axis of the Earth as a system.

As to Apple’s purpose for the new data center, I have the feeling we will all be taken by pleasant surprise when Apple finally announces what it is for. Meanwhile, I haven’t a foggy clue.

zewazir

the really interesting question is why this requires not one but two really huge datacentres in the same place.

OR, why does one data center facility need two very-large buildings? I don’t know if this is different thinking or not, but when someone builds two or more buildings at the same site, I tend to think of the buildings as components of one facility.

mhikl

I don?t know what you have been smoking, drinking or injecting, John, but I’m enjoying your ride. You?re not just thinking outside the box, you?re meditating on a mountain channelling the ethers of a future far beyond the usual seer’s tomorrow. Now I know how Alice felt in her new world down the rabbit hole.

Most stimulating article to date. Apple continues to kneecap one old industry after another and there’s no where for any prey to hide. These media moguls must feel like they’re being assaulted in their own gated bunkers by a madcap anarchist wrenching their belongings from their feeble fingers. And it?s all wonderfully legal. I?m glad you’re on Apple’s side and Apple?s on ours.

I know a certain nobody who must be mopping up hurl in his dog house.

John Martellaro

mhikl: I sent your note on to Adam, and he’s seen it.  I guess we shall blush in unison.

Frog42

What if Apple is following a Google-esque path? What if they were to offer to be a data center and store a wide variety of media for any/all of the media ?owners? and then serve as a delivery mechanism to whatever distribution channel the owner directs? i.e. they would maintain the ?master? electronic version of a movie and stream it to customers on behalf of Netflix or Comcast or whomever. They might even choose to offer the storage and delivery for ?free? or for a percentage of advertising space rather than a traditional fee. Then, as everyone gets comfortable with them managing the source data (meanwhile gathering a whole bunch of usage data about customer demand…) they could make offers to the content owners for direct access to the Apple customer base with a much more compelling ?sales pitch?. ?Mr/Ms Studio head, we can offer you more revenue than you are getting from Comcast because…?

I don?t know. I keep wondering what kind of ?stuff? might require so much data storage. I also like Steve Webb?s idea of there being an Apple version of YouTube with user generated content being offered in conjunction with iAds - but even that doesn?t seem to require this much data storage (at least not yet…)

kevin

Good thoughts. It’s reasonable to think video is going to be a major component of the data center’s operations. And there’s plenty of food for thought. Here are some more:

1. (Content owner POV) Targeted iAds can be delivered for video content.
2. (User POV) The user wants to be able to watch any chunk of video content on-demand immediately. (New content, i.e., episodes, could still debut on a regular schedule.)
3. (User POV) The user wants to easily find and mark content for viewing, and wants related content recommended (i.e., Genius, Ping).
4. (User POV) The user wants to watch and interact on any device - mobile, tablet, desktop, or large screen. And of course, seamlessly switch from one device to another (such as with AirPlay).
5. (User POV) The user is willing to pay for transport on each pipe separately, but pay only once for desired content to be delivered over any/multiple pipes.
6. (Content owner POV) Some content owners want to be paid multiple times for delivery of the same content over different pipes, or to different devices (TV vs. tablet vs. mobile). (See Fox/Viacom vs. Time Warner/Cablevision)  Some care about the distinction between home and mobile.  Some don’t care about any of this (see WatchESPN app).
7. (Pipe owner POV) Many pipe owners (esp cable) want to be paid extra for delivering content (as opposed to generic transport).
8. Apple believes simplicity in pricing and product for the customer is essential to success. (Behind-the-scenes payments between content owners, pipe owners, and Apple need not be as simple, though Apple might prefer the magic number of 30% for its own cut.)

mhikl

There?s gotta be a special heaven for the intensely focused, John. What I wish they would realise is that connecting through TMO isn?t their only place to commit ranticide.

Apple’s integrated ecosystem has become so catholic and encompassing it is drawing in prole to noble who would previously given naught to thought of Apple in any shape. Would Apple’s latest foray put a cap to the credit card? Could it be that 20th Century financial transliterators are in for a super Apple shakeup? The calamity of the past two decades of unfettered economic regulation on such institutions will not be a taste easily forgot* and the game seems to continue unabated. Maybe Alice’s wonderland is the world from which Apple will lead us. At the least, when I think of Apple I sense a future of hope and wonder.

* Death may be final but lost money is always in someone else’s pocket.

Lee Dronick

Apple?s integrated ecosystem has become so catholic and encompassing it is drawing in prole to noble who would previously given naught to thought of Apple in any shape. Would Apple?s latest foray put a cap to the credit card? Could it be that 20th Century financial transliterators are in for a super Apple shakeup? The calamity of the past two decades of unfettered economic regulation on such institutions will not be a taste easily forgot* and the game seems to continue unabated. Maybe Alice?s wonderland is the world from which Apple will lead us. At the least, when I think of Apple I sense a future of hope and wonder.

* Death may be final but lost money is always in someone else?s pocket.

Damn! That is some good wordsmithing! It is possibly Shakespeare’s birthday, though it is generally recognized that he was probably born on the 23rd. All we know for sure is that he was baptized on the 26th.

wab95

If rumours are true, Apple may have just beaten Google to the punch in cloud music, to which this centre may be, at least in part, devoted.

mhikl

What ever his birthdate and hour, Shakespeare’s was surely star-crossed. Such a short life.  But so many great words. Would be proud to call him Aries but Taurus does well by him.

Apple isn’t always first in races, wab95, but it is usually victor in style and grace. If its centre turns out to be the best of the best without special wow factor, I could live with that. However, “Wow! Who would have thought!”, would get me to the Madeira in haste.

Ronin

Conundrum?  Don’t try to make it sound complex.  It’s junior high school physics.

The jet has the same rotational velocity as the earth.  It doesn’t stop rotating with the earth just because the tires are off the ground and it doesn’t fly in a vacuum.

Don’t hijack the thread.  Re-read an elementary physics book on your own time.

Ronin

Conundrum?  Don?t try to make it sound complex.  It?s junior high school physics.

The jet has the same rotational velocity as the earth.  It doesn?t stop rotating with the earth just because the tires are off the ground and it doesn?t fly in a vacuum.

Don?t hijack the thread.  Re-read an elementary physics book on your own time.

gslusher

The only answer that I can come up with is that these are like a Time Capsule for a string of datacentres that will actually be delivering the video content around the world. These are not the datacentres that will be delivering the AppleTV content for viewers here in Japan, for example, these are the BACKUP for the datacentres that will be delivering the AppleTV content for viewers all around the world.

You just might have something there. There are good reasons for locating a massive data delivery facility fairly close to the customer. (I’ve used various sites to test my download speed. It’s nearly always fastest from the nearest site. One likely reason is that it doesn’t have to jump through as many hubs/links.)

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