When Apple banned 24 vaping apps from the App Store recent, lots of people were happy. The Macalope wasn’t. He explained why in his Macworld column.

For now those who have installed the apps can continue to use them, but in the long term developers have no way to deliver updates that could provide bug fixes or firmware updates. It’s worth pointing out that the canisters that did contain cyanide were counterfeit. The Macalope just checked his local liquor store and we haven’t banned alcohol sales because prison wine blinded some people. He also checked the App Store and we haven’t banned mixology apps, either. But one of the apps Apple banned actually checked canisters to see if they were counterfeit. (Tip o’ the antlers to Ben Thompson’s piece on this subject.) It’s very temping to make lifestyle judgements. We have waged a long war with the tobacco industry (which stands to benefit from banning vaping, by the way), so seeing young people vaping nicotine is concerning. But lots of choices adults make can be concerning.

 

Check It Out: Apple’s Very Parental App Store Decisions

2 Comments Add a comment

  1. aardman

    Pornography is legal. Apple decided not to have anything to do with it and I don’t see anyone getting all indignant about a private company choosing not to carry that type of merchandise..

    Yes, vaping is also legal. But boy, is it under-regulated and populated with unethical sellers. I point to the widespread addiction of underaged users as prima facie evidence. Right now, it’s an ethical and legal can of worms and Apple is wise to wash its hands of the whole business.

  2. JBSlough

    I really feel this crosses some kind of line. They already didn’t allow apps to sell vaping supplies. That made sense. But some of these are software that controls the hardware. How’s that fair? Macalope has a point. They don’t ban alcohol apps. I don’t see a difference. As of right now vaping is legal.

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