These Artificial Gills Could One Day Help Divers

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Jun Kamei, graduate of the Royal College of Art, designed artificial gills using 3D printing. They consist of a gill and a respiratory mask, and it lets people breathe underwater. Mr. Kamei has built a working prototype, and it successfully extracts oxygen from water, and releases carbon dioxide back out. Right now it doesn’t product enough oxygen for a human though. His idea was that artificial gills would be essential in the future when the ocean rises due to climate change.

By 2100, a temperature rise of 3.2 degrees celsius is predicted to happen, causing a sea-level rise affecting between 500 million and three billion people, and submerging the megacities situated in the coastal areas.

Need an Apple Pencil Case? You Can 3D Print This One

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Redditor u/flashnet needed an Apple Pencil case, so they made one themselves using a 3D printer. They tried existing designs but ran into trouble with the magnets it used. So this one—called iCICLE—screws together. There are plenty of Apple Pencil sleeves on the market, including ones that Apple sells. But the cases I’ve seen are bulky, and they would take up a lot of space in your bag. The iCICLE is slim and has a minimal design that Jony Ive would be proud of. In fact, it was inspired by Johnny, the Apple Pencil case on Indiegogo. Unfortunately the product didn’t get fully funded. The iCICLE is a close approximation, and if you happen to have a 3D printer, you can download the files on Thingiverse.

Need an Apple Pencil Case? You Can 3D Print This One

There's a $399 3D Printer on Kickstarter

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3D printing is poised to be affordable by a lot more people, and there’s a project on Kickstarter speaking to this trend. It’s called Neva, and it’s a $399 3D printer from established 3D printer manufacturer Dagoma. Actually, there are $299 Early Bird pledge level available as of this writing that will net you a Neva, but the retail price for the device is set at $399. In addition to being inexpensive, it’s designed to be operated with just one button. They’re also made in California, and the bases themselves are 3D printed. The video below is a tad weird in that the narrator tells you lots of things and then says, “but we won’t” tell you that thing. It’s interesting anyway. The project blew past its funding goal of $50,000 in a few hours (earning more than $10,000 in pledges while I wrote this Cool Stuff Found). That speaks to the desire that many people have to be able to 3D print on their own desk.