The 5G 'Health Hazard' Was a Misinterpretation

· Andrew Orr · Link

In 2000 a physicist was asked to study the health risks of wireless networks. He found [PDF] that there “was likely to be a serious health hazard.” Except he was wrong.

In his research, Dr. Curry looked at studies on how radio waves affect tissues isolated in the lab, and misinterpreted the results as applying to cells deep inside the human body. His analysis failed to recognize the protective effect of human skin. At higher radio frequencies, the skin acts as a barrier, shielding the internal organs, including the brain, from exposure. Human skin blocks the even higher frequencies of sunlight.

Despite all the studies showing a link between smartphones and cancer being debunked, I don’t think this idea will ever go away.

Turn Your Favorite Websites Into Searchable Documents: $47.88

· Bryan Chaffin · TMO Deals

We have a deal on a subscription to History Search Pro Plan, which turns websites you visit into searchable documents. You choose what gets added to the service, and it works through browser extensions for Chrome, Safari, Firefox, Opera, and Microsoft Edge. One year of History Search Pro Plan is $47.88 through our deal.

Lawmakers Target Amazon As Big Tech Goes to Washington

· Charlotte Henry · Link

Congress lawmakers

Amazon faced the toughest questioning from lawmakers during a hearing Tuesday attended by representatives of big tech firms. Reuters reported that Apple too, found itself in the firing line during the hearing. Questions to Apple focussed on costs associated with App Store Purchases

Legislators also demanded explanations from Apple Inc about charges for apps and in-app purchases, Facebook Inc for its rapidly changing privacy policy and Alphabet’s Google over whether its rivals are demoted in search results. The committee does not have authority to punish the companies, and any effort to change antitrust laws affecting tech firms would face hurdles in the Republican-controlled Senate. So the questioning served largely to convey the panel’s displeasure over many of the companies’ business practices.

PSA: FaceApp Owns Photos You Create With App

· Andrew Orr · Link

According to its terms of service, popular app FaceApp owns the rights to all photos you create with it.

Essentially, if you make something in FaceApp, FaceApp can do whatever it wants with what you’ve made. Not only can it repost your images without your permission, it can monetize the images, either directly or indirectly, without compensating you or notifying you that it has done so in any way.

Unfortunately, this sort of thing isn’t new. Facebook has similar terms, and so does Google.

iPhones Have 100,000 Times More Processing Power Than Apollo 11 Computer

· Andrew Orr · Link

iPhones have over 100,000 times more processing power than the Apollo 11 computer; with 4GB of RAM they have over a million times more memory, and with 512GB of storage they have over seven million times more storage.

Despite the rapid technological advances since then, astronauts haven’t actually been back to the moon since 1972. This seems surprising. After all, when we reflect on this historic event, it is often said that we now have more computing power in our pocket than the computer aboard Apollo 11 did. But is that true? And, if so, how much more powerful are our phones?

It’s amazing to see how far technology has advanced since then.

Keeper Password Manager 1-Year Subscription: $19.99

· Bryan Chaffin · TMO Deals

Kepper Password Manager on iPad, MacBook, and iPhone

We have a deal on Keeper, a password manager for iOS, Mac, Android, Windows, and Linux. With Keeper’s password manager and vault, you can generate, store, and AutoFill strong passwords on all devices while securely storing private documents. It also supports multiple forms of 2FA, including TOTP, SMS, Touch ID, Face ID, and U2F security keys (e.g. Yubikey). A one year subscription is $19.99 through our deal.

In UK, Critical Shortage of Java and Python Programming Skills

· John Martellaro · Link

Python featured image.

ZDNet writes: “The skills shortage is spreading further, with developers for data science, DevOps and cloud roles in high demand.”  Citing recruiting research in the UK:

Harvey Nash director David Savage said the recruiter found the biggest skills shortages were in data science and analytics. He said because data science demands a narrow field of technical skills, plus a highly academic approach, there are huge problems in the talent pipeline and no clear or easy way to increase the number of available professionals.

There’s a shortage in the U.S. as well for highly skilled programmers.

DuckDuckGo Apple Maps Updated for Enhanced Search

· Andrew Orr · Link

DuckDuckGo logo

The DuckDuckGo Apple Maps integration has been updated for enhanced search, like maps re-querying, local autocomplete, and more.

With Apple, as with all other third parties we work with, we do not share any personally identifiable information such as IP address. And for local searches in particular, where your approximate location information is sent by your browser to us, we discard it immediately after use. This is in line with our strict privacy policy. You can read more about our anonymous localized results here.

I was happy to see the integration and look forward to these updates. Apple is a good partnership for DuckDuckGo.

Investigating Whether A Drug Dealer Founded Bitcoin

· Charlotte Henry · Link

Writer Evan Ratliff spents years tracking Paul Le Roux, and eventually rejected the theory that the drug dealer might be bitcoin creator Satoshi Nakamoto. But the the theory never quite went away. Then, a court case brought it right back into his inbox. He recounted the gripping story for Wired.

Over a few days, I found myself uncovering surprising correlations I’d missed or discounted the first time. After a couple more, I’d built a spreadsheet mapping the evidence for and against the proposition. Within weeks, I’d poured over every piece of writing credibly attributed to Le Roux or Satoshi, and found myself perplexed at the growing size of the “for” column on my spreadsheet. I called up experts, ran my evidence by them, and found no one who could really shoot it down. After a month, I was able to convince a colleague with deep cryptocurrency knowledge, someone who’d followed every twist and turn of the Satoshi saga, that Le Roux was the odds-on solution to the mystery of who created bitcoin. And then, just as I was ready to go out and publicly place my bet on Paul Le Roux, to make the case for him from every thing I’d found, I started to wonder about what I hadn’t.

Arabic App Store Rolls Out to Devs

· Charlotte Henry · Link

ios 13 App store

Apple pushed out an Arabic version of the App Store to developers. It will be fully rolled out as part of iOS 13. The Jerusalem Post reported it is part of a wider push into the Arab world from the company.

The store will “open” to the general public simultaneously with the release of Apple’s latest operating software system, IOS-13. This move is seen largely as the company’s latest attempt at capturing the growing Middle East market. “Apple is continuing its push for localized content in the Arab world by releasing a version of its App Store – in full Arabic glory,” Noura Alzabie, a strategist and project manager at the Bahrain chapter of the Global Social Media Club, told The Media Line. Apple opened its first store in the Arab world in 2015, and the amount of Arabic content available, while still relatively small, has since grown.

Visualizing Men's Pockets Versus Women's Pockets

· Andrew Orr · Link

This isn’t super tech-related, but this website gives a nice visualization of how men’s pockets are bigger than women’s pockets. There’s also a section that lets you find jeans that can fit smartphones like the iPhone X, Samsung Galaxy, and Google Pixel.

Only 40 percent of women’s front pockets can completely fit one of the three leading smartphone brands. Less than half of women’s front pockets can fit a wallet specifically designed to fit in front pockets. And you can’t even cram an average woman’s hand beyond the knuckles into the majority of women’s front pockets.

iOS 13 Password Bug Gives Unauthenticated Access in Settings

· Andrew Orr · Link

Image of apple’s settings app

An iOS 13 password bug was discovered in the latest betas that give unauthenticated access to Website & App Passwords in Settings.

As detailed by iDeviceHelp on YouTube, you can access all of the saved usernames and passwords in Settings by repeatedly tapping the “Website & App Passwords” menu and avoiding the Face ID or Touch ID prompt. After several tries, iOS 13 will show all of your passwords and logins, even if you never successfully authenticated with Face ID or Touch ID.

I haven’t been able to replicate the issue, but I’ll keep trying to see.

SuperTank 27,000mAh Portable Charger: $134.99

· Bryan Chaffin · TMO Deals

We have a deal on a beast of portable battery, the 27,000mAh SuperTank. This device can charge up to four devices at a time with 2 USB-C and 2 USB-A ports—plus one of those USB-C ports can put out 100 watts of power. It’s TSA-compliant and is crush-proof, too. The SuperTank is $134.99 through our deal.

Get eero Mesh Wi-Fi for up-to-50% Off for Amazon Prime Day

· Dave Hamilton · TMO Deals

eero for 50% off as part of Amazon Prime Day

eero, one of our favorite consumer mesh Wi-Fi systems, is available for up-to-50% off Monday and Tuesday as part of Amazon Prime day. Deals include:

All of these deals are only available for Amazon Prime members, and only while supplies last, of course. Go now!

Twitter Web Redesign Rolls Out For All Users

· Andrew Orr · Link

Twitter logo

A Twitter web redesign is rolling out for all users, simplifying navigation, a sidebar, profile switching, and more.

The update is designed to make it easier to move around Twitter. Before, you’d have to click on your Profile icon to access features like Lists, Themes, Settings, and other options. Meanwhile, getting to Moments was available both in this Profile dropdown menu and in the main Twitter navigation at the top of the screen, next to Notifications and Messages.

Air Force Might Defend Area 51 With Force

· Andrew Orr · Link

Over the weekend a Facebook event page to raid Area 51 has had over 400,000 people signing up. This is because of the belief that aliens or alien technology are held there. But the Air Force is prepared.

“[Area 51] is an open training range for the US Air Force, and we would discourage anyone from trying to come into the area where we train American armed forces,” McAndrews said. “The US Air Force always stands ready to protect America and its assets.”

Lawmakers Want Apple to Turn Privacy Talk into Action

· Andrew Orr · Link

Tim cook

Although Tim Cook vocally supports privacy laws in the United States, Apple doesn’t actually support many of them.

A number of privacy advocates and U.S. lawmakers — who did not attend the meeting — say Apple has not put enough muscle behind any federal effort to tighten privacy laws. And state lawmakers, who are closest to passing rules to limit data sharing, say Apple is an ally in name only — and in fact has contributed to lobbying efforts that might undermine some new data-protection legislation.

This is something I’ve noticed as well. I think Tim and co should do more to support privacy legislation.

Amazon Prime Changed How we Shop online

· Charlotte Henry · Link

Amazon Prime box

To mark Amazon Prime DayRecode looked at the origins of the next-day delivery service. It outlined the dramatic effect it had on how people perceived online shopping.

The service, which launched in February of 2005, was a first of its kind: For an upfront payment of $79, customers were rewarded with all-you-can-eat two-day delivery on their orders. At the time, Amazon charged customers $9.48 for two-day delivery, meaning if you placed just nine of these orders in a year, Prime would pay for itself.  “[E]ven for people who can afford second-day shipping, this feels sort of like an indulgent luxury,” Bezos said of Prime, on a call with Wall Street analysts when he introduced the service in February 2005. Jeff Bezos’s letters to customers on the Amazon.com homepage announcing the Amazon Prime and Prime Video launches. With it, Amazon single-handedly — and permanently — raised the bar for convenience in online shopping. That, in turn, forever changed the types of products shoppers were willing to buy online.

Apple VPN as the Company's Latest Privacy Service

· Andrew Orr · Link

Michael Grothaus argues that an Apple VPN should be the company’s next privacy service.

The obvious existing bundle this VPN could slip into would be iCloud. Apple could offer an “iCloud VPN” service to all paid iCloud subscribers. And because Apple controls all the hardware and operating systems of the devices it makes, its VPN setup could be dead simple: if you’re signed into iCloud on your device, iCloud VPN is set up, running, and protecting your browsing activity from outsiders without you having to click a single button.

I’m not so sure I want an Apple VPN. Remember, this would mean that Apple could potentially know all of your network traffic unless they had a no logging policy.

Computing Pioneer Alan Turing the Face of New British Banknotes

· Charlotte Henry · Link

Alan Turing will be the new face of the Bank of England’s £50 notes, BBC News reported. His codebreaking was crucial to the Allies victory in the Second World War. The new notes will enter circulation by the end of 2021.

The note was once described as the “currency of corrupt elites” and is the least used in daily transactions. However, there are still 344 million £50 notes in circulation, with a combined value of £17.2bn, according to the Bank of England’s banknote circulation figures. “Alan Turing was an outstanding mathematician whose work has had an enormous impact on how we live today,” said Bank of England governor Mark Carney. “As the father of computer science and artificial intelligence, as well as a war hero, Alan Turing’s contributions were far ranging and path breaking. Turing is a giant on whose shoulders so many now stand.”