Organize Your Digital Life With a Universal File Naming Scheme

2 minute read
| Editorial

I like organization. As the saying goes, “A place for everything, everything in its place.” My files are tidy, and I keep mind maps of my digital files as well as physical stuff I own. Naturally, I’m a regular over at r/datacurator. For a while my ultimate goal was to create a universal file naming scheme. I’ve finally achieved it.

[What’s the Best Method to Manage PDFs on Apple Devices?]

Why?

Why file names? Because file names are inherently universal. I could use Finder tags to organize files, but if I wanted to move my files to Windows, those tags would disappear. But all modern operating systems support naming files.

Here are examples. I have a folder called Graphic Design that contains icons, product mockups, color samples, and gradients I use for my articles. I organized this by creating a basic classification scheme. For example, icons had the word “icon” in the file name, and mockups had the word “mock” in the file name.

icon-apple books

mock-iPad Pro

Another example: I keep a lot of PDFs in Apple Books and I created categories for them.

  • Game
  • Guide
  • Other
  • Personal
  • Scan
  • White Paper (WP)

I did the same thing, where I put each category name in the file name. Example: scan-2018 tax document. But last night I stumbled on an article at Monzo, and it mentioned how they use standard names. And it inspired me to create a better file naming scheme.

Categories and Sub-Categories

The Monzo scheme is personalized to how they manage design files in Sketch. But you can adapt it for your own use. Here’s how I adapted it:

[Category][Sub-Category]-Name

It’s beautiful in its simplicity. You can add as many sub-categories as you want. In my own use I haven’t had to use more than two. To keep it simple I think you should only use one category. Here’s how that looks in my system:

OLD: blue-mariner

NEW: [color][blue]-mariner

OLD: guide-cooking basics

NEW: [guide][DIY]-cooking basics

I could also go further, and name them something like this: [design][color][blue]-mariner. But I don’t like having long names. Another area I use it in is books. All of my books and PDFs are in Apple Books. If you add an ePub file you found on the web, you can add it to Apple Books and rename it. Apple Books in iOS 12 has fantastic new sorting systems. I can sort by Recent, Title, Author, or Manually.

image of finder folder with color samples

I like collecting color samples. I’ve got a couple of interesting ones, like the official Prince Purple

If you want to sort by name, you could create a category like Fiction, add the author as a sub-category, and finally the name of the book. Or do it the other way around with the author as the category. Like PDFs I have categories for my books, so in the new scheme an example would be:

[learn][Richard Preston]-The Wild Trees

I’m not sure how Windows does it, but in Finder you can search for files based on file type. That’s why I don’t use PDF or eBook as a category. Even if Windows doesn’t support this, a standardized naming scheme makes it easier to search for files. Additionally, you can leave the brackets out if your OS doesn’t support special characters.

[iOS 12: How to Create Album Folders in Photos]

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