Apple Lisa OS Will Be Publicly Released in 2018

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Next year, the Computer History Museum will release the Apple Lisa OS for free, as an open source project. The Lisa was Apple’s first computer with a graphical user interface, released almost 35 years ago.

Apple Lisa

However, the Lisa was a flop, selling only 10,000 units on an R&D investment of US$150 million. The Lisa caused a fight between Steve Jobs and then-CEO John Sculley, which caused Steve to leave Apple.

Image of the Apple Lisa computer.

At the time, the Lisa was pretty cutting-edge. Not only did it have a graphical user interface, but it also introduced the mouse as an input tool. But it was an expensive machine, costing US$10,000 in 1983, which is the equivalent of US$24,000 today.

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Manqueman

Started work at a small law firm in August 85. Their system was a Lisa and a Mac — insufficient memory between the two, as I recollect.

geoduck
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geoduck

Very happy to hear this BUT it will need a way to run on 21st century systems. Either ported over or run under an emulator or something

John Kheit
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John Kheit

I wonder if they will release the initial xenix based version that actually had multitasking, or the follow up later versions that were more limited.

PSMacintosh
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PSMacintosh

We had one in the office (Mortgage Business), but it was dedicated to another person’s work……so I, even though co-owner, was banging out hours on the Apple II machines. Until two Macs arrived!
My first “personal” machine was a Mac 512K enhanced and a whooping 10 MB external Hard Drive (for a total of $5000…..ouch!). (Still have it!!!!)

furbies
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furbies

But it was an expensive machine, costing US$10,000 in 1983, which is the equivalent of US$24,000 today.

Thats’s iMac Pro money…… Ouch !