Blue Adds Professional Voice Effects with Yeti X Pro USB Mic

Blue launched a new version of the Yeti microphone, the Yeti X, shown below. The device is being targeted at gaming, streaming and podcasting, but the signature new feature is VO!CE Software, which gives creators and streamers professional voice effects and presets at the touch of a button. Internally, it features a four-capsule condenser microphone array, and it offers high-res LED metering. The presets and effects mentioned above are controlled through a a multi-function smart knob. It ships in October for $169.99.

Amazon Music HD Adds Tracks for Audiophiles

Amazon Music HD is a new service that provides high quality streaming for audiophiles. New subscribers to Amazon Music Unlimited get a three month free trial.

This 90-day free trial offer is a limited time offer. This offer applies only to the Amazon Music HD Individual Plan and the Amazon Music HD Family Plan and is available only to new subscribers to Amazon Music Unlimited. After the 90-day trial, your subscription to the Amazon Music HD Individual Plan or the Amazon Music HD Family Plan, as applicable, will automatically continue at the monthly price of $14.99 ($12.99 for Prime members) plus applicable tax (if you selected the Amazon Music HD Individual Plan) or $19.99 plus applicable tax (if you selected the Amazon Music HD Family Plan) until you cancel.

Amazon Tweaked Algorithm to Push Its Own Products

Amazon changed the way its search algorithm works. According to an exclusive report by the Wall Street Journal,  changed products that are more profitable for the online retailer.

Amazon optimized the secret algorithm that ranks listings so that instead of showing customers mainly the most-relevant and best-selling listings when they search—as it had for more than a decade—the site also gives a boost to items that are more profitable for the company. The adjustment, which the world’s biggest online retailer hasn’t publicized, followed a years long battle between executives who run Amazon’s retail businesses in Seattle and the company’s search team, dubbed A9, in Palo Alto, Calif., which opposed the move, the people said. Any tweak to Amazon’s search system has broad implications because the giant’s rankings can make or break a product. The site’s search bar is the most common way for U.S. shoppers to find items online, and most purchases stem from the first page of search results, according to marketing analytics firm Jumpshot.