Atari’s Missile Command Heads to iOS This Spring

2020 is the 40th anniversary of Missile Command and Atari is bringing it to iOS sometime this spring.

Missile Command: Recharged maintains the same perspective of the original game, in which missile silos battle incoming rockets to protect civilian structures. Recharged uses a neon-colored visual design, a la classic arcade game re-imaginings like Pac Man Championship Edition and Space Invaders Extreme. Gameplay has been remixed, with power-ups, an upgrade system, and an augmented reality mode that projects gameplay onto a “virtual arcade cabinet.”

How the Windows Team Was “Blinded” by the iPad

Former Windows chief Steven Sinofsky wrote a blog post about how his team were caught off guard by the iPad.

The success of iPhone (140K apps & 3B downloads announced that day) blinded us at Microsoft as to where Apple was heading. Endless rumors of Apple’s tablet *obviously* meant a pen computer based on Mac. Why not? The industry chased this for 20 years. That was our context.

It’s a good read. Everyone expected Apple to compete with netbooks. They did, but not by creating their own Mac netbook.

iPads Can’t Kill Laptops But They are a Viable Alternative

It’s the tenth anniversary of the iPad. Steve Jobs introduced the device on January 27, 2010. Nathan Ingraham writes about the iPad but insists Apple is still trying to kill laptops. But I think he disproves his own point when he shares what Mr. Jobs said:

Shortly after the iPad launch, Jobs nailed his famous metaphor, comparing iPads to cars and traditional laptops and PCs to trucks, saying he believed that for most people, a car met all their needs. That clearly has not come to pass for a majority of computer users, but that doesn’t mean Jobs was wrong.

The metaphor is correct. Apple isn’t trying to kill laptops, they’re saying that for many people iPads are a good alternative. Alternative, not replacement.

Backblaze Storage Pod Celebrates 10 Years

Ten years ago, cloud storage company Backblaze introduced the Storage Pod. It’s a custom-built server for reliable, cheap storage. Today is the Pod’s 10th Anniversary.

Back in 2007, when we started Backblaze, there wasn’t a whole lot of affordable choices for storing large quantities of data. Our goal was to charge $5/month for unlimited data storage for one computer. We decided to build our own storage servers when it became apparent that, if we were to use the other solutions available, we’d have to charge a whole lot more money. Storage Pod 1.0 allowed us to store one petabyte of data for about $81,000. Today we’ve lowered that to about $35,000 with Storage Pod 6.0.

It’s an interesting, worthwhile read. Backblaze is a good cloud storage provider in my opinion.