Getting Two-Factor Verification Codes for Your Apple ID

· · Quick Tip

If you’re using two-factor authentication for your Apple ID (and you should be!), then you’re likely familiar with how you’ll approve access from your trusted devices with a six-digit code. But what if that code never comes through or you accidentally dismiss the prompt? Well, in today’s Quick Tip, we’re going to show you an easy way to generate a new one from your Mac or iOS device!

Setapp: Like Netflix for Mac Apps

· · Dr. Mac's Rants & Raves

Setapp currently offers unrestricted use of 64 apps for $9.99/month.

Dr. Mac’s been testing Setapp, a new subscription service from MacPaw with access to more than 60 Mac apps for $9.99 a month. It’s an ambitious undertaking by MacPaw, but the good doctor thinks they’ve done a masterful job…

4 Possible Roadmaps For macOS and iOS Evolution

· · Analysis

MacBook-iPad side by side

From time to time, we’ve seen scenarios related to how the Mac/macOS and the iPad/iOS might evolve as personal computing platforms. We know about the declining sales of the iPad and Apple’s seeming inattention to the Mac line as whole in 2016. In turn, that has created some discussion about their respective future developments. John catalogs the likely and not-so-likely roadmaps for these products.

Apple, Kill the LG UltraFine 5K and Make Your Own Displays

· · Editorial

As if it weren’t bad enough that the LG UltraFine 5K performed poorly when placed too close to a wireless router, now Apple’s shipping times for the display have slid to five to six weeks. Jeff thinks that it just might be time for Cupertino to resume making the displays for their Macs and MacBook Pros instead of relying on the third-party market to fill the void.

How to Get Info on Your iCloud Devices

· · Quick Tip

This Quick Tip is about how you can look within your iCloud settings to get information about every device you’ve signed into. This is helpful if, for example, your iPhone has been stolen, and you need to find out what its serial number is without having it right in front of you. We’ll tell you how to find this with iOS, macOS, and your Web browser!

How to Install ddrescue and Recover Files for Free

· · How-To

Recovering files from a failing hard drive is stressful and it can be pretty expensive, too. Reliable backups can help with the stress part, and ddrescue can help with the rest because it’s good at recovering files, and it’s free. The catch is that it requires a little command line mojo, but we’ve got you covered. Follow along to learn how to install and use ddrescue, plus we’ll show you how to give it a graphic interface, too.

Just Discovered Fruitfly Malware Uses Pre-OS X Code

· · News

Malwarebytes discovered Fruitfly malware for Macs

Malwarebytes discovered a Mac malware threat dubbed Fruitfly that’s being used to target biomedical research facilities. Calling Fruitfly new, however, may not be correct because it looks like it’s been around since at least 2014, and it also relies on some system calls that predate OS X and macOS.

The Mother of All Demos on Video

· · Cool Stuff Found

You may have heard of the Mother of All Demos, especially if you’ve studied, or even read up on, computing history. But have you seen it? There is a video of this legendary event (via Reviewed.com), and I personally find it fascinating. Here’s why this is a thing. The demo was given by Doug Engelbart in 1968, when punch cards were how you interfaced with a computer. But in this demo, the world was shown (list via Wikipedia) windows, hypertext, graphics, efficient navigation and command input, video conferencing word processing, dynamic file linking, revision control, a collaborative real-time editor, and the computer mouse. The freaking computer mouse! None of these things existed outside the circle of people involved in the demo. It was huge. No, it was enormous. And many of the people in the demo went on to be involved in the Xerox PARC, which played a major role inspiring Jef Raskin and Steve Jobs for the Mac. The Mother of All Demos resonated through tech culture for decades, and it took decades to make most of that list above mainstream. If you like tech history, you should book some time to watch this. And if you do, think about the context of the times and be amazed. One last note, the typed story at the beginning explains how the movie itself was made.

Opera Reinvents the Web Browser with Neon for Mac and Windows

· · Cool Stuff Found

Opera thinks the current state of web browsers kind of sucks, and they’re pretty much right. Instead of just complaining, however, they developed a now browser concept where they can experiment with different interface ideas. They’re calling the browser Opera Neon, and it’s available for Mac and Windows users to try out. Neon does away with familiar elements like tabs in favor of bubbles that float at the edge of your display. Performance is a little slow right now, but it’s a concept platform and not a finished product. You can download Neon for free at the Opera website.

macOS Tip: Option-Click Wi-Fi Icon For Details

· · Tips

Screenshot of W-Fi Option Menu with Labels

Here’s a handy tip so you can quickly access information about your router, and see if your network is performing well. See your BSSID, signal-to-noise ratio, and even the transmit rate between your router and computer. All it takes is a press of a button and a click of your trackpad/mouse.