Analyst Ming-Chi Kuo Says A-series Macs Really Are Coming

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Apple iMac with ARM processor

The clues are all there. Apple has a mind to move its Macs to the A-series CPU. We discussed this at length on our TDO podcast recently. And now, Ming-Chi Kuo of TF Securities has confirmed it. Mike Wuerthele at AppleInsider reports: “Kuo also predicts that Mac models will adopt Apple’s A-series processor in some form starting 2020 or 2021.” So does that mean the 2019 Mac Pro will remain with Intel CPUs? And then make an abrupt jump in 2020?  The mind boggles.

The World's Largest Apple Collection is For Sale

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An Austrian computer repairman has amassed what is possibly the world’s largest Apple collection, and it’s currently for sale.

Over the years since he began working for a company that repaired Apples in Vienna in the 1980s, Roland Borsky’s collection has grown to roughly 1,100 computers, he says – far more than the 472 items at Prague’s Apple Museum, which says it is the world’s biggest private collection of Apple products.

Now that his income has dried up, Borsky says he cannot afford the rent on his warehouse. He hopes that a benefactor will put his collection on display and pay off his debt of 20,000-30,000 euros ($23,000-35,000).

If someone doesn’t buy the collection it will have to be destroyed.

U.S. Customers Get a New Apple Data Tool

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Apple customers in the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand get a new Apple data tool. This tool is the same that European users got because of GDPR.

Apple devices such as the iPhone or Apple Watch collect detailed data about users, such as whom they email, call or text message and even biometric data such as heart rates and fingerprints. But Apple’s practice has been to keep much of that data on the devices themselves and encrypt it with the user’s pass code, meaning that Apple does not possess the data and cannot unscramble it if asked to do so by law enforcement officials.

It’s good to see Apple do this, and I’m going to use it and see what changes have been made. You can log into the page here.

Popular Web Browsers Dropping TLS 1.0 and 1.1 Support in 2020

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The Mac Observer staff shares their favorite VPN, or virtual private network, services

The big names in the web browser community, Apple, Google, Microsoft and Mozilla, are all dropping support for Transport Layer Security (TLS) 1.0 and 1.1 in March 2020. The protocol allowed for secure and encrypted connections to web servers for online forms and data transmission, but proved to have several security flaws. It has been superseded by TLS 1.2. Ars Technica noted the pending depreciation saying,

The impact of removing the old protocols shouldn’t be too substantial. All four companies cite usage figures for the old versions; Firefox sees the most TLS 1.0 and 1.1 usage (1.4 percent of all secure connections) while the other three vendors claim a figure below 1.0 percent. The current recommendation is that sites switch to TLS 1.2 (which happens to be the minimum required for HTTP 2.0) and offer only a limited, modern set of encryption algorithms and authentication schemes. TLS 1.3 was recently finalized, but it currently has little widespread adoption.

Odds are most people won’t notice the lack of TLS 1.0 and 1.1 support since the vast majority of sites have already moved on to version 1.2.

Privacy Setting Do Not Track Doesn't Do Anything

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Privacy setting Do No Track found in virtually all browsers doesn’t actually do much. That’s because its use isn’t enforced.

Why do we have this meaningless option in browsers? The main reason why Do Not Track, or DNT, as insiders call it, became a useless tool is that the government refused to step in and give it any kind of legal authority. If a telemarketer violates the Do Not Call list, they can be fined up to $16,000 per violation. There is no penalty for ignoring Do Not Track.

Get 1 Year of Setapp for $69

· · TMO Deals

Screenshot from Setapp

I am delighted to run today’s deal on a year of Setapp for $69. That’s 42% off retail on a service that was already one of the best in the Mac world. Setapp offers you more than 100 high quality Mac apps for a monthly or yearly subscription. That includes several apps that I use all the time, and I strongly recommend this service.

China Wants Google to Help With its Muslim Persecution

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Google wants to create a censored version of its search engine for China. And China has recently shared laws on speech suppression that Google will likely have to use to achieve its Muslim persecution.

Article 28 of the new laws orders telecommunications operators to “put in place monitoring systems and technological prevention measures for audio, messages, and communication records” that may have “extremifying information.”

Forms of “extremification,” as laid out in the laws, are vague. They include “interfering” with people’s ability to interact with people of other ethnicities or faiths and “rejecting or refusing public goods and services.”

Don’t be evil, Don’t be evil, Don’t be evil, Don’t be evil, Don’t be evil, Don’t be evil.

Anna Wintour Interviews Jony Ive About Innovation

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Vogue editor Anna Wintour interviewed Jony Ive at Wired‘s 25th anniversary event. They talked about innovation, Apple’s secrecy. and civic duties of tech companies.

I’ve been doing this for long enough where I actually feel a responsibility to not confuse or add more noise about what’s being worked on because I know that it sometimes does not work out.

Unfortunately there isn’t a video interview but if Wired releases one I’ll add a link.

Apple Watch Key in Hip Replacement Recovery Study

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Apple Watch used for knee and hip replacement recovery

Your Apple Watch may be key in recovering from knee and hip replacement surgery. Apple and Zimmer Biomet, a joint replacement manufacturer, are teaming up for a medical study that uses the smartwatch to help with the recovery process. CNBC says,

Apple and Zimmer Biomet have created a mobile app called mymobility, which aims to help guide patients through their surgery to improve their experience, as well as their health outcomes. It includes educational resources, exercise videos and a way for patients to contact their surgeon and care team with questions and concerns.

Considering the number joint replacement surgeries is on the rise, this results of this study could be very beneficial to patients. It’s also another example of Apple’s serious commitment to being a real player in the health care market.

A Tutorial: High Dynamic Range (HDR) for 4K TVs

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Plain 4K vs 4K + HDR

If you’ve been pondering a new 4K/UHD TV for the holidays (and an Apple TV 4K), you’ll want to check out this very easy to read introduction to the High Dynamic Range (HDR) technology used in modern TVs. You’ll learn about the basic tech and the similarities and differences between HDR10, Dolby Vision, HDR10+, HLG and which ones each TV maker offers.

BusyMac's BusyContacts: $19.99

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BusyContacts on MacBook

We have a deal on on BusyMac’s BusyContacts, the company’s Contacts replacement app for the Mac. You can customize your views; track activities associated with each contact including calendar events, emails, and messages; create Smart Filters based on certain conditions; integrate with BusyCal, and much more. It’s $19.99 through us, 60% off retail.

Graduate Student Solves Quantum Verification Problem

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Graduate student Urmila Mahadev has solved a quantum verification problem. Quantum verification answers the question: How do you know whether a quantum computer has done something quantum? Redditor u/Wolgoz has an ELI5 (Explain Like I’m 5) explanation:

There are different kinds of problems in computer science, closely related is the class of problems where you can easily verify if the answer is correct, but it’s hard to find the answer. This is however about the class of problems where you can’t easily check it with a normal computer, but can check it with a quantum computer.

She made a protocol that allows you to use a quantum device to check the answer, without the uncertainty of quantum mechanics. She does however make an important assumption, so it’s not certain if this will work.

Developers Aren't Satisfied With Mac App Store Update

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macOS Mojave brought a Mac App Store update, but developers aren’t fully satisfied by Apple’s changes.

Digging into survey answers, the biggest issues developers still have are ones that have been identified multiple times over the years: inability to offer trials or priced upgrades, as well as a lack of analytics. Lengthy app reviews and sandboxing rules have been issues for some developers, as well. Though the former has seen marked improvement in 2018, 33 percent of MAS developers still rate “faster approval” as a desired improvement, and 65 percent of non-MAS developers cite the approval process as a reason for staying out.

Apple can’t treat the MAS like the iOS App Store. If Apple wants the MAS to be the sole source of Mac apps, it has to give developers enough incentives to favor it over their own websites.

Apple Buys Asaii, Adds its Team to Apple Music

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Asaii purchased by Apple

Apple purchased the music and artist discovery service Asaii—a deal that was confirmed by the company’s investment backer The House. Asaii makes tools for finding and managing artists, along with a tool for music services to make recommendations to listeners. The House founder Cameron Baradar told Music Ally,

As the first investors in Asaii, we are incredibly excited by their recent acquisition by Apple where they will have the opportunity to dramatically scale their impact and continue building out their vision for the future of the music industry.

Asaii’s founders are now part of the Apple Music team. Their tools can predict the next music hits weeks in advance. Couple that with the music discovery tools and Apple Music’s listening recommendations could get a lot better very soon.

Meross Smart Wi-Fi Power Strip: $23.99

· · TMO Deals

Meross Smart Wi-Fi Power Strip

We have a deal on the Meross Smart Wi-Fi Power Strip. This device not only has three standard plugs and two USB ports, it has Wi-Fi connectivity that allows you to control each plug individually through the Meross app. You can turn connected devices on and off, set schedules, and activate timer routines, protecting your devices and trimming down your power usage. It’s $23.99 through our deal.

macOS Mojave Made Me Hate Dark Mode

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macOS Mojave Mojave Dark Mode disappoints

I’ve been a fan of Dark Mode ever since Adobe added it to Photoshop CS6 back in 2012. That’s why I was so excited to see system-wide Dark Mode support in macOS Mojave, and yet Apple managed to make me dislike the feature so much I gave up on it. For now, I’ll be sticking with the pre-Mojave light colored windows and menus instead. I planned on using Dark Mode to cut the brightness out of Finder windows, but now I’m going back to what I did before: When I’m writing and my screen feels too bright I switch to Grayscale mode. Andrew Orr did a great job of explaining how to turn it on and off for your Mac as well as iPhone and iPad. Check out his tip.

How Do Companies Make Money off our Data?

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Big Data is a huge money making business, and a big example of this is AOL. No longer an ISP, AOL is now a data broker.

The collected data has value because of how it’s used in online advertising, specifically targeted advertising: when a company sends an ad your way based on information about you, such as your location, age, and race. Targeted ads, the thinking goes, are not only more likely to result in a sale (or at least a click), they’re also supposed to be more relevant to consumers.

While some people might want better ads that are more relevant to them, the article makes a good point: “I have targeted ads that are more attuned to my desires and my wants… But if you have someone who has an alcohol abuse problem getting a liquor store ad…” 

And I’m cynical enough to believe that the average advertiser wouldn’t care about that in the slightest.

Smart Speakers Take Advantage of Wikipedia

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Smart speakers like the Amazon Echo take advantage of Wikipedia, and Wikipedia deservers way more of our money.

But it’s not just the fact that this donation is, in the scheme of things, paltry. It’s that this “endowment” is dwarfed by what Amazon and its ilk get out of Wikipedia—figuratively and literally. Wikipedia provides the intelligence behind many of Alexa’s most useful skills, its answers to everything from “What is Wikipedia?” to “What is Slate?” (meta). Tech companies that profit from Wikipedia’s extensive database owe Wikimedia a much greater debt.

Amazon recently donated US$1 million to Wikimedia, but that’s a drop in the bucket when you think just how many people and services use Wikipedia. Especially since it’s a non-profit organization that gets most of its money through donations.