Right to Repair Laws, Apple Design Critics - TMO Daily Observations 2017-02-15

· · The Mac Observer's Daily Observations Podcast

TMO Daily Observations

Apple doesn’t make it easy for people to get parts for do-it-yourself repairs, and some states want to change that. Kelly Guimont and John Martellaro join Jeff Gamet to debate whether or not companies should be required to make device parts available outside of authorized repair centers, plus they look at a claim Apple is actually pretty crappy ad designing products.

Apple Releases New Design Resources for iOS Developers

· · Cool Stuff Found

Today Apple shared some free design resources for iOS developers with an update to its iOS Human Interface Guidelines (via 9to5Mac). The resources include UI and template materials to make it easier to design iOS apps. Apple says the design resources are “comprehensive and accurately depict the full range of UIKit controls, views and glyphs available to developers using the iOS SDK.” The files are available in Sketch and Photoshop formats. This is a change from the Sketch-only files in the past. Interestingly, both light and dark UI elements are given. It adds a small amount of fuel to the fire for a rumored Dark Mode.

Apple Releases New Design Resources for iOS Developers

Hey Quark Fans, Check Out QuarkXPress for Dummies

· · Cool Stuff Found

It’s been a while since a quality QuarkXPress book came out, so my long time friend and graphic design expert Jay Nelson stepped up to the plate with a QuarkXPress for Dummies. Jay explains print and digital publishing workflows, color management, image resolution, fonts, output formats, and more. He also explains the evolution of QuarkXPress, which is great for understanding how it went from being the premier desktop publishing tool to the more specialized product it is today. QuarkXPress for Dummies is available now on Amazon for US$34.99.

Hey Quark Fans, Check Out QuarkXPress for Dummies

Is There Anything Apple Can't Do? That's Now a Problem

· · Editorial

Apple store logo

Once upon a time, Apple was famous for saying “no” to harebrained or even some legitimate product ideas.  That was an essential strategy for Apple to emerge from its troubles in the 1990s. Now, however, a much larger company is increasing its surface area to the customer. That, combined with Apple’s organizational structure, is creating some problems that we’re seeing today. John explains.